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Old September 9th, 2004, 09:45 PM   #1
hkskyline
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Wind Energy for Lamma Island

Wind energy for Lamma
Sylvia Hui, HK Standard

Hong Kong Electric is making a tentative step towards renewable energy by
building a wind turbine on Lamma Island, but activists say such a small effort is
hardly in touch with world energy trends.

The HK$10 million turbine, to be built at Tai Ling, will produce 700 megawatt
hours a year, or 3 per cent of the annual electricity consumption on the island,
when it starts operating in early 2006.

The site will cover an area of 4,400 square metres and has a capacity ranging
from 600 to 850 kilowatts.

It will operate throughout the year, but will only reach full capacity for about 13
per cent of the time.

``The average wind speed in the area is about five to six metres per second, so
most of the time it will be turning slowly. Optimum speed is at 15 metres per
second,'' Hong Kong Electric chief engineer Cheung Nai-yik said.

Due care has been taken to study its effects and an environmental impact
assessment report was submitted to the Environmental Protection Department
last month.

"The noise produced will not exceed 100 decibels and should not affect
neighbouring villages, the nearest of which is 260 metres from the site,'' Cheung
said.

Ecological and visual impacts have also been assessed, and the height of the
turbine, at 45 metres, stays below the government height limit.

Once completed the turbine would only require an annual maintenance fee of
between HK$100,000 and HK$200,000.

``It will reduce 240 tonnes of pollutants released by burning coal each year,''
Cheung said.

Hong Kong Electric's annual amount of coal-burning emissions is about four
million tonnes.

Greenpeace, which has been urging power companies and the government to
introduce renewable energy, welcomed the pilot scheme but said Hong Kong
Electric ought to have a wider vision. "It's encouraging that their environmental
impact assessment has been completed,'' Greenpeace campaigner Gloria Chang
said.

"But a corporation of their size and power should not just look at a single
turbine. They should extend their vision to the whole south China region.

"Compared with the SAR's neighbouring regions, we are moving at a snail-like
pace.''

The power company's rival CLP Power is also planning a 600kW turbine,
although it will not start generating electricity until late 2007.

The two power companies combined produce more than 90 per cent of the
territory's sulphur dioxide and more than 60 per cent of the carbon dioxide
annually, Chang said.

10 September 2004 / 02:32 AM
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Old September 13th, 2004, 12:23 AM   #2
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Wow government so rich~Wind power would be a good source of reproductive energy.
but are they just wasting money? wind power needs a lot of money and land, maintanence...etc
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Old September 13th, 2004, 03:59 AM   #3
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I have to agree that this project is not the best answer. If Hong Kong wants renewable energy then at least make it so that it powers more than just 3% of the island's energy consumption and reaches full capacity most of the time compared to just 13%.
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Old September 13th, 2004, 07:19 AM   #4
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I don't care about wasting money, as long as it does help reducing pollutants.
That's a good start, i must say.
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Old September 13th, 2004, 02:28 PM   #5
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currently nearly 100% of hong kong's electricty is nonrenewable.
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Old September 15th, 2004, 02:57 AM   #6
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Well of course I agree on using renewable energy, but just afraid on another harbour show fest...[no apologize],[mickey mouse] those things you know...
Just want a project that is efficient and will do a good job
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Old September 15th, 2004, 04:18 AM   #7
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There is not enough land to build a meaningful wind farm in Hong Kong. I saw a big one near Shantou to the east a couple years ago. Perhaps Hong Kong can purchase renewable energy from China.
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Old September 15th, 2004, 06:36 AM   #8
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Yes, renewable energy plants build in China. Hong Kong purchase energy from it. But I heard that now China is lack of electricity. They are purchasing some electric from Hong Kong. And I heard that China is planning to use Nuclear power plant is it right?

But one thing sure is that China would have space to do hydro, wind, geothermal renewable power plants.
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Old September 15th, 2004, 04:27 PM   #9
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most of china is sadly powered by coal. But there is heaps of wind farms in china which is good.
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Old June 8th, 2005, 08:44 PM   #10
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Wind Farms

Two islands eyed for wind farms
Sites off Sai Kung and Lantau on CLP Power shortlist

Cheung Chi-fai
8 June 2005
South China Morning Post

Hong Kong's largest power supplier is eyeing two islands off Sai Kung and southern Lantau as bases for wind-energy development.

Kau Sai Chau off Sai Kung and Hei Ling Chau off Lantau have been shortlisted by CLP Power from among 70 sites across the city as having wind-farm potential.

A six-month detailed wind-measurement study will be launched to find which of the two sites has the strongest development potential.

However, even after a site is selected, only a single 600-kilowatt wind turbine, with a generation output capable of meeting the power demand of 300 households, will be built by the end of 2007. The scale is smaller than the 800kW wind turbine being built by Hongkong Electric on Lamma Island to be completed by next year.

CLP Power had previously rejected sites including Cheung Chau, Penny's Bay, Tuen Mun and Tung Chung and excluded offshore sites it said were too expensive for wind-power development.

Kau Sai Chau now houses a public golf course, while Hei Ling Chau is a prison area.

CLP Power said both sites had favourable wind resources and readily available marine access. Kau Sai Chau and Hei Ling Chau also have 20 hectares and 10 hectares of vacant government land available respectively.

The company said sufficient land meant both sites could afford further wind-turbine development.

Richard Lancaster, CLP Power's commercial director, said the shortlisted sites, given their sizes, were far from satisfying a proposed requirement of generating 1 or 2 per cent of electricity from renewable sources. He said satisfying a 4 per cent requirement would require occupying the Kowloon peninsula for wind-turbine development.

Clive Noffke, a member of the Green Lantau Association, which fiercely opposed a super-jail proposal on Hei Ling Chau, said a single wind turbine for demonstration or education purposes was acceptable. But he was worried reclamation might be needed if the site were turned into a larger wind farm. "It is not worth damaging the site for some negligible benefits."
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Old February 20th, 2006, 07:16 AM   #11
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Wind Farms in Sai Kung to Power Tseung Kwan O

UK firm plans wind farm off Sai Kung
Project would see turbines as tall as Jardine House to serve Tseung Kwan O
20 February 2006
South China Morning Post

A British-based renewable energy company is planning to build Hong Kong's first commercial wind farm off Sai Kung.

Under the plan, up to 50 massive wind turbines - described as being "as tall as Jardine House with blades as long as a Boeing jet" - will be built on the Ninepin islands, or Kwo Chau Kwan To.

The turbines could each produce 4MW of electricity to serve residents of the populous new town Tseung Kwan O.

Wind Prospect (Hong Kong) general manager Alex Tancock said the company was consulting various government departments, academics and power companies about the project.

"We are in the feasibility study phase, and it is hard to say what the total cost will be until we complete the study," he said. "Our intention is to complete it as soon as we can."

The company hopes to form an alliance with CLP Power, the city's largest electricity supplier serving Kowloon, the New Territories and Lantau, to distribute the electricity.

A CLP spokeswoman confirmed that Wind Prospect had approached the utility for possible participation in the project.

"We are obtaining further information on the project before deciding on the next step forward," she said.

A spokesman for the Environment, Planning and Lands Bureau would not confirm whether the bureau was in talks with Wind Prospect, saying only that it received inquiries about different green energy projects from time to time.

Wind Prospect operates four wind projects in England and has some projects under development in Scotland, Ireland and Australia.

It has advised CLP on renewable energy projects.

The company is an offshoot of Windcluster, a pioneering wind power developer that was set up in the UK in 1988.

News of the planned wind farm comes as the government is seeking public views on changes to the city's electricity market after the Scheme of Control, which regulates the sector, expires in 2008.

Identifying the city's two power firms, CLP and Hongkong Electric, as the main local source of air pollution, the Environment, Transport and Works Bureau plans to toughen their emissions standards and aims to have 1 to 2 per cent of the city's electricity coming from renewable sources by 2010.

The Wind Prospect project would be the biggest, but not the first, wind generation scheme in Hong Kong. Hongkong Electric has erected a wind turbine on Lamma that is due to begin serving residents of the island on Thursday. It has a capacity of just 800kW.

To make the Ninepin venture financially viable, Wind Prospect would need access to CLP's power grids, a source familiar with the proposal said. It would need CLP's coal-fired generation units as back-up in case of wind power malfunctions.

The project's viability would also hinge on resolving technical and financial issues, as the city was located in a typhoon belt and the cost of power production and infrastructure, as well as insurance on wind turbines, was expensive.

Another thorny issue was the likelihood that the venture would increase tariffs, the trade off for cleaner air, the source said.

A case in point is the tiny solar energy project on the government's offices at Wan Chai Tower.

Solar power costs $5-15 per kWh compared with the $1.17 per kWh Hongkong Electric charges customers, an engineer familiar with the Wan Chai project said.

"While the pressure for more [renewable energy] is intensifying, there is a big question mark how to make it commercially viable," the engineer said.
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Old February 26th, 2006, 09:41 PM   #12
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Power firm risks a wind of change
Chester Yung
Hong Kong Standard
Monday, February 27, 2006

As the tension between the government and the territory's two power companies over the development of the electricity market intensifies, Hong Kong Electric has taken a calculated risk in building the city's first wind-power station in the hopes of gaining favorable business conditions later.

Amid rising concerns over Hong Kong's worsening air quality, the Environment, Transport and Works Bureau and Economic Development and Labour Bureau have locked horns with the city's two franchised power utilities - HKE and CLP Power - over how to balance environment protection with providing cheap and efficient energy.

Last Thursday, the Li Ka-shing- owned HKE - which provides electricity to Hong Kong Island and Lamma - commissioned the territory's first wind-power station, a giant turbine with 50-meter blades, costing HK$15 million and which will take five years to build.

Despite its impressive size, HKE managing director Tso Kai-sum admitted the 800-kW turbine is relatively small in scale "perched atop Tai Ling on Lamma Island and expected to generate about a million units of green electricity and supplant the need to burn 350 tonnes of coal annually."

The company is also studying the feasibility of building a wind farm on the southern end of Lamma, but is quick to note there are huge technical difficulties, including an unstable wind supply.

Data gathered from a 147-day trial from September 26, 2005, to February 20 - which is mostly outside the annual typhoon season - indicated peak and lowest levels of daily electricity output could differ by as much as 300 times.

Tso said the company is looking for locations for more windmills, including at sea.

"The key consideration would be the cost, as we need to sink piles at least 20 meters deep into the seabed to support the windmills," Tso said.

"This is very expensive ... We will not do anything that is not profitable."

The proposal follows the report that Wind Prospect, a renewable energy company based in Britain, plans to build 50 wind turbines off Sai Kung.

The company's general manager, Alex Tancock, said the company was consulting Hong Kong government departments, academics and power companies about the projects.

It has been reported that the company hopes to form an alliance with CLP - the city's largest electricity supplier which serves Kowloon, the New Territories and Lantau - to distribute the electricity.

Last Thursday's commissioning ceremony for the HKE wind turbine came during a critical time - the consultation exercise on Hong Kong's future electricity market will end late next month.

Last December 30, the government announced a major revision in the future operation of the two power companies.

For example, the next scheme of control agreement might decrease the companies' permitted rate of return from its present minimum of 13.5 percent to as low as 7 percent.

The government also suggested shortening the next deal to 10 years when it comes into effect in 2008.

Both companies argue the government's proposed move will dampen investment and jeopardize the future development of electricity.

While, on one hand, the utility firms have criticized the proposal, on the other they appear to want to test the government's bottom line during this critical time, or try to win the government's trust in exchange for more favorable terms in the next agreement.

During the commissioning ceremony, Secretary for Environment, Transport and Works Sarah Liao said: "Harnessing wind energy for power generation is now a reality and, from now on, we can engage in discussions based on our actual experience.

"We are very thankful that HKE has positively responded to our recommendation [to explore green power]. It has built this turbine and demonstrated its tests publicly."

With air pollution worsening, Chief Executive Donald Tsang in his maiden policy address last October hinted that Hong Kong's two power utilities will face stiffer conditions to continue business after the current scheme of control agreements expire in 2008.

Before that, the inaugural report of the Council for Sustainable Development, which is headed by Tsang, suggested that 1 percent to 2 percent of Hong Kong's total electricity supply could be generated from renewable sources by 2012.

HKE's moves have been recognized by the government. We'll have to see what CLP has to offer.

In light of Tsang's modest goals for green power in Hong Kong, and given the so-called difficulties cited in producing clean electricity, it is worth noting that HKE's turbine was made in Germany, the world's leading producer of wind energy (accounting for almost 40 percent of the world's total) and which is not far behind Japan for the lead in solar power.

Wind and solar energy together account for more than 10 percent of Germany's electricity, a rate that is expected to double by 2020.
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Old February 27th, 2006, 07:58 AM   #13
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Is it possible for Hong Kong to incorporate wind turbines into supertall skyscrapers? I know it would probably be a design problem in terms of aesthetics but I think the environment is more important.
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Old February 27th, 2006, 11:02 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huhu
Is it possible for Hong Kong to incorporate wind turbines into supertall skyscrapers? I know it would probably be a design problem in terms of aesthetics but I think the environment is more important.
I think such a plan won't work out well.
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Old February 27th, 2006, 09:42 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunny
Yes, renewable energy plants build in China. Hong Kong purchase energy from it. But I heard that now China is lack of electricity. They are purchasing some electric from Hong Kong. And I heard that China is planning to use Nuclear power plant is it right?

But one thing sure is that China would have space to do hydro, wind, geothermal renewable power plants.
Unfortunately, there are laws to protect CLP and HK Elec. profits in order to keep them running. It is not possible to open the electricity market right now, even buying power from China, unless through the two electricity generators. there is a debate to change this law and open the electricity markets for new investor. but i don't think it's gonna happen in the near future, let sees what is gonna happen.
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Old February 27th, 2006, 09:46 PM   #16
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wind energy i don't think wind energy will work for most part of hk. we really don't have that amount of land and consistent wind flow to keep the electricity supply.

but it might be a good way for power generation in remote areas like Po Toi Island and Grass Island (Tap Mun.)
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Old February 28th, 2006, 06:04 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CFCheng
I think such a plan won't work out well.
Ummm, any rationale for this view?

The original design for the Freedom Tower replacing the WTC in NYC called for wind turbines at the top. So it's not impossible.
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Old February 28th, 2006, 11:09 AM   #18
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yeah I agree it's not gonna work... if i remember right I read on Singtao or Tai Kung Pao, Even if they cover the ENTIRE HONG KONG TERRITORY with Wind Turbines, it's only enough to produce like... 13% of HK's energy use...
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Old March 1st, 2006, 01:39 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huhu
Ummm, any rationale for this view?

The original design for the Freedom Tower replacing the WTC in NYC called for wind turbines at the top. So it's not impossible.
might be to store backup electricity for emergency when the power goes off. so all the lights and elevators (possibly) will remain in funtion so everyone can be evacuated quick and safely. i don't think a wind turbin in that size can supply enough energy for the whole tower.
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Old March 1st, 2006, 06:03 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricIsHim
might be to store backup electricity for emergency when the power goes off. so all the lights and elevators (possibly) will remain in funtion so everyone can be evacuated quick and safely. i don't think a wind turbin in that size can supply enough energy for the whole tower.
I don't think it was meant to supply the whole tower, obviously there would be concerns with wind reliability (although at that height, it's usually pretty windy). It was supposed to reduce the power consumption of such a huge building; smaller buildings wouldn't be fitted with them b/c they'd be blocked. I think with HK's power situation the way it is, they should be exploring all the possibilities.
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