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Old February 18th, 2006, 05:40 AM   #81
ROCguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HoustonTexas
Isn't New Orleans like Toronto? Everyone outside of it (In Louisiana, in Canada) hates it! (from my Louisiana Friends to you). They also disslike the fact all their taxes go there.
That's also Illinios (to Chicago), Georgia (to Atlanta) and ESPECIALLY New York STATE (to NYC)
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Old February 18th, 2006, 06:57 AM   #82
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^And possibly Kentucky and Washington.
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Old February 18th, 2006, 07:44 AM   #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROCguy
That's also Illinios (to Chicago), Georgia (to Atlanta) and ESPECIALLY New York STATE (to NYC)
It used to be that way. After Katrina devastated New Orleans, everybody else in Louisiana had to learn the hard way, just how much revenue we (New Orleans) do bring to the State of Louisiana.
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Old February 18th, 2006, 07:47 AM   #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lamsalfl
I dunno how long it has been there but there is a Vantage Tower sign (about 15 feet tall) on the corner of O'Keefe and Girod.

www.vantagetower.com
It has been there for about two months, I believe, if that much.
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Old February 18th, 2006, 08:11 AM   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc
I think those estimates are overly ambitious, and very optimistic.
I'd be thrilled to think it's really true, but it does not seem "realistic." Let's hope NO can be back sooner rather than later.
Thanks for the good wishes. We hope so, too. As for what's going on now, you're not here to see what's happening. Some of New Orleans is very much like it was on August 28, i.e., Algiers, Uptown, Quarter, Bywater (aka, Upper Ninth Ward), Marigny, Garden District, and parts of Carrollton. These neighborhoods, along with Mid-City, Lakeview, Central City, and Lower Ninth were the most densley populated areas of the city prior to Katrina.

Sadly, Mid-City, Lakeview, parts of Central City, and all of the Lower Ninth are shadows of their former selves. New Orleans East (not nearly as dense) is a ghost town.

So what do we have now? We have Algiers, Uptown, Quarter, Bywater, Marigny, Garden District, and parts of Carrollton, Mid-City, and Central City. It's not that hard to believe we are where at least some of the media is now saying we are.

I don't want to paint an overly-optimistic picture. However, I'm sick of the media dwelling on the negative. There are some good things happening here. For instance, the suburbs are bursting at the seams, all of the large oil and gas companies with regional/branch headquarters have committed to return, our historic areas remain largely untouched, and our convention center (4th largest in country once current expansion has been completed) has reopened and beginning in the summer, will be largely booked.

There are other positive signs as well. Tulane's medical school will return in the summer from its exile in Texas. LSU's medical and dental schools will return in the fall, along with the remainder of their researchers. The federal government is continuing to relocate its exiled regional headquarters/branch headquarters back to the city. Carnival Cruises, Norweigian Carribbean, Royal Carribbean, and Princess have all recommitted to the Port of New Orleans, which prior to Katrina, was the fasted growing cruise port in the world.

There are good things happening here. It's just going to take a while.
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Old February 18th, 2006, 09:02 AM   #86
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Central City? Don't you mean Mid-city, JPK?
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Old February 18th, 2006, 09:39 AM   #87
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No, he had it right the first time. Central City was hit pretty bad.
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Old February 18th, 2006, 07:40 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cannonized
Central City? Don't you mean Mid-city, JPK?
I'm not certain of the official definition of Central City, but I consider it to be the area bounded by Louisiana/St Charles/Earhart/S. Claiborne, with the main thoroughfares being Jackson and MLK between S. Claiborne and St. Charles. Dryades is also a main street.

Speaking of Central City, I've noticed a marked increase in the number of people living there over the past two months. I drive down Baronne or Dryades on my way uptown from work to avoid St. Charles traffic. There are a lot more lights on in houses and lots of people on the streets.

Some of my neighborhood definitions are overly expansive, e.g., Carrollton. I tend to lump parts of Holly Grove, Gert Town, and Fontainebleau/Broadmoor (the part from S. Carrollton to Broadway) into Carrollton.
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Old February 19th, 2006, 01:08 AM   #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPKneworleans
Thanks for the good wishes. We hope so, too. As for what's going on now, you're not here to see what's happening. Some of New Orleans is very much like it was on August 28, i.e., Algiers, Uptown, Quarter, Bywater (aka, Upper Ninth Ward), Marigny, Garden District, and parts of Carrollton. These neighborhoods, along with Mid-City, Lakeview, Central City, and Lower Ninth were the most densley populated areas of the city prior to Katrina.

Sadly, Mid-City, Lakeview, parts of Central City, and all of the Lower Ninth are shadows of their former selves. New Orleans East (not nearly as dense) is a ghost town.

So what do we have now? We have Algiers, Uptown, Quarter, Bywater, Marigny, Garden District, and parts of Carrollton, Mid-City, and Central City. It's not that hard to believe we are where at least some of the media is now saying we are.

I don't want to paint an overly-optimistic picture. However, I'm sick of the media dwelling on the negative. There are some good things happening here. For instance, the suburbs are bursting at the seams, all of the large oil and gas companies with regional/branch headquarters have committed to return, our historic areas remain largely untouched, and our convention center (4th largest in country once current expansion has been completed) has reopened and beginning in the summer, will be largely booked.

There are other positive signs as well. Tulane's medical school will return in the summer from its exile in Texas. LSU's medical and dental schools will return in the fall, along with the remainder of their researchers. The federal government is continuing to relocate its exiled regional headquarters/branch headquarters back to the city. Carnival Cruises, Norweigian Carribbean, Royal Carribbean, and Princess have all recommitted to the Port of New Orleans, which prior to Katrina, was the fasted growing cruise port in the world.

There are good things happening here. It's just going to take a while.
Sounds like some really steady progress. I really do hope New Orleans can come back super strong.
I think the main point I've been thinking about though, is the future of the levee system in New Orleans. Will it be built to keep the water out? Will the federal government (i.e., President Bush) keep their committment to build the levees back? That's the big problem, and should be the main focus. If everyone returns, then God forbid, in 2010 another huge hurricane hits, the city's back where it was. It is a harsh reality, but one that can be avoided if the government builds what they were supposed to a couple years ago.
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Old February 19th, 2006, 01:29 AM   #90
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Let's call a spade a spade....Metro New Orleans does have a decrease. Right now, there are 1.2 million living in Metro New Orleans. Is that good or bad? Who knows? It is a decrease of around 200,000 from pre-Katrina. So, in a sense that is not good. But, considering what we've been through, some would say that is good. But, that is where we are right now...
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Old February 19th, 2006, 04:46 AM   #91
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Theoretically, levees are pretty much needed only when a hurricane threatens. You don't need them in day-to-day life. Water is not abutting one side of the levee. Someone needs to go out to Lakeshore Dr. and take pics of the levee to show that the lake is at least 100 yards from the levee.
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Old February 19th, 2006, 10:57 AM   #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lamsalfl
Theoretically, levees are pretty much needed only when a hurricane threatens. You don't need them in day-to-day life. Water is not abutting one side of the levee. Someone needs to go out to Lakeshore Dr. and take pics of the levee to show that the lake is at least 100 yards from the levee.
Good point. That's why they're called "hurricane protection levees". Seems that a hurricane protection system would be capable of protecting against any hurricane. But hey, who am I to question that?
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Old February 20th, 2006, 02:40 AM   #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc
I think the main point I've been thinking about though, is the future of the levee system in New Orleans. Will it be built to keep the water out? Will the federal government (i.e., President Bush) keep their committment to build the levees back? That's the big problem, and should be the main focus.
You are right on point. It seems like the president is going to stick to his earlier promise to armor the levees and move all of the canal pump stations to the lakefront. The failure of the canal floodwalls, as opposed to the lake or river levees, is what caused this tragedy. By moving the pumps to the lake, the canals will not be subject to tidal surges.

While the pump plan protects central New Orleans, the plan does nothing for New Orleans East. However, the armoring of the levees will significantly help central NOLA as well as NOLA East.
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Old February 21st, 2006, 12:57 AM   #94
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I would love to see some action taken on wetland rehabilitation, since the disappearance of the coastline helped Katrina maintain its strength so far inland. I've heard estimates on NPR from LSU geologists that it would only take a few billion dollars and a few years to do, but nobody in gov't is talking about it.
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