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Old November 19th, 2004, 06:58 AM   #61
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Sun Hung Kai seen winning bid for HK terminal stake-paper

HONG KONG, Nov 19 (Reuters) - Hong Kong developer Sun Hung Kai Properties (0016.HK) is set to double its stake in Asia Container Terminals (ACT), which owns Container Terminal 8 in Hong Kong's Kwai Chung, the South China Morning Post reported on Friday.

The paper, quoting a shareholder source with ACT, said Sun Hung Kai Properties' bid for Hongkong Land's 28.5 percent stake in ACT had been selected, pending signing of a contract.

An announcement is expected in a few days.

Sun Hung Kai Properties officials were not immediately available for comment.

It is estimated that Hongkong Land will reap a profit of HK$200 million (US$25.64 million) to HK$300 million from the deal.

The Hong Kong property group had trumped Singapore port operator PSA International's HK$685 million offer of the Hongkong Land's stake in ACT, the paper said, but it did not give a precise figure.

PSA is owned by state-investment agency Temasek Holdings Pte. Ltd..

Shares of Sun Hung Kai Properties were unchanged at HK$78 in early Friday trade, after gaining nearly 15 percent in the last three months.
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Old November 21st, 2004, 08:03 AM   #62
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Hong Kong Harbor Operators Vie For CSX Assets
18 November 2004
(From THE ASIAN WALL STREET JOURNAL)
By Kate Linebaugh and Bruce Stanley

Hong Kong -- PORT OPERATORS and shipping companies are jostling to buy into Hong Kong's container terminals, demonstrating the value of the world's busiest port even in the face of rising competition from China.

Up for sale is a cluster of CSX Corp.'s port assets, from Venezuela to Australia to Shanghai, the crown jewels of which are stakes in two of Hong Kong's nine container terminals. Jockeying over the sale by the U.S. rail company has fanned regional rivalries among the world's biggest port operators and exposed one of this city's deepest insecurities: that its century-old role as the gateway to China is fading.

China's economic might and rapid reform program threaten Hong Kong on a number of fronts, from its position as Asia's financial capital, with the region's second-largest stock market, to its role as aviation hub, with an airport that handles more international cargo than any other in the world. As mainland ports near neighboring Shenzhen and further up the Chinese coast get bigger and more efficient, the dominance of Hong Kong's port is also under threat.

According to some bankers, CSX is seeking more than US$1 billion for its port assets, which include three Hong Kong berths. That price seems high to some people who have looked at the businesses, yet it appears that several contenders submitted final bids by this week's deadline.

Speculation that the winning bid will be hefty indicates that even as Hong Kong's port loses business to rivals in China, the city's natural deep harbor is still a big draw -- especially for potential buyers like Singapore's PSA Corp., which has long angled to
expand into China's southern industrial heartland, where rival Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. is dominant.

'The fact that so many people are bidding at high levels tells you that Hong Kong's not dead yet,' says Jonathan Beard, managing director at GHK (Hong Kong), a consultancy that prepared a study for the government on the outlook for Hong Kong's port.

The port -- one of the world's biggest, with 24 berths controlled by five operators -- is a cornerstone of Hong Kong, accounting for 4% of its economy and about 110,000 jobs. It has been steadily losing market share to rivals in southern China. Last year, Hong Kong handled 62% of the area's direct-ocean-cargo shipments compared with 96% in 1996, according to GHK's study, which predicts the decline in market share could continue over the next 15 years. Hong Kong's cargo throughput has grown by an annual average of 5.6% during the past five years, while Shenzhen's Yantian port has rocketed ahead at 46% per year.

That's partly because Hong Kong's rates are 12% higher than those for ports near Shenzhen. About two-thirds of the cost difference goes to the truckers who move
the goods. Even so, some exporters say the efficiency of Hong Kong's port and the number of ships that pass through -- nearly double that in Yantian -- keep it attractive.

'Although we are increasingly using Yantian in specific cases, at this point in time, Hong Kong still in general has the advantages of efficiency and economies of scale,' says Vincent Li, managing director of Extra Trading Co., a Hong Kong company that exports housewares and gifts to the U.S.

Preliminary government data show that container traffic at the main Hong Kong terminals increased by more than one-fifth in October from a year earlier, suggesting that 2004 will prove stronger than previous years. It is these numbers and the high profitability that are drawing bidders, analysts say.

'It's not a bad port from a cash-generation point of view, but it's not a growth port, longer term,' says Danie Schutte, an analyst at investment bank CLSA Asia-Pacific Markets.

PSA, which operates Singapore's port, confirmed it has bid. Hutchison, the world's largest port operator, widely expected to have bid, declined to comment. NWS
Holdings Ltd., a Hong Kong-based conglomerate, has also put in a bid with a major international shipping line, according to people close to the deal.

The Hong Kong assets, however, have lost a bit of their luster. CSX earlier this year lost one of its biggest clients, Hanjin Shipping. It risks losing another main customer, A.P. Moller-Maersk Group, when the contract comes up for renewal in December. This
appears to have caused some potential buyers to not compete with CSX's assets. Cosco Pacific Ltd., linked to China's biggest shipping company, didn't submit a final bid.

Some analysts say PSA, which manages the world's largest trans-shipment hub in Singapore and has invested in ports in 11 countries, might have bid aggressively for CSX's assets. They say that PSA, owned by the Singapore government's investment company Temasek Holdings Pte. Ltd., has deep pockets and -- unlike Hutchison -- doesn't have minority shareholders who might challenge what it spends in Hong Kong.

If Hutchison were to buy CSX's assets, its motivation would be mostly defensive -- to keep the Hong Kong facilities out of the hands of PSA, analysts say. Still, there are limits to what Hutchison should pay for CSX's Hong Kong operation. 'If they can't get it
at a decent price,' CLSA's Mr. Schutte says, 'I would prefer for them to walk away.'
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Old November 22nd, 2004, 06:21 AM   #63
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Hongkong Land Sells Asia Container Stake
Dow Jones Newswires
22 November 2004
The Asian Wall Street Journal

HONG KONG -- Hongkong Land Holdings Ltd. said it has agreed to sell its entire 28.5% stake in Asia Container Terminals Ltd., one of Hong Kong's port operators, to Sun Hung Kai Properties Ltd.

"The price is at a premium above cost," said a Hongkong Land spokeswoman, who declined to disclose the value of the deal. After the transaction, Sun Hung Kai Properties will become the largest shareholder of Asia Container Terminals, with a 57% stake.

Sun Hung Kai properties declined to disclose the acquisition price.

Hongkong Land's spokeswoman confirmed that it received and accepted an offer placed by Singapore-based PSA International. But Sun Hung Kai Properties exercised its first right of refusal, outbidding PSA and buying
Hongkong Land's entire stake, the spokeswoman said.

PSA also is bidding for another stake in Asia Container. CSX World Terminals, an Asia Container shareholder that is the ports arm of U.S. railway operator CSX Corp., is disposing of its shares.

Asia Container's founding shareholders are Hongkong Land Holdings, Sun Hung Kai Properties, CSX World Terminals and NWS Holdings Ltd. Hongkong Land Holdings is a Singapore- and London-listed property unit of conglomerate Jardine Matheson Holdings Ltd.
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Old November 23rd, 2004, 06:44 AM   #64
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A new approach to handling charges
Willy Lin, Chairman

The Better Hong Kong Foundation released a study report last month on the competitiveness of the Hong Kong port. The report, prepared by Mckinsey & Co, correctly points out that the high boundary-crossing trucking costs, together with the high Terminal Handling Charge (THC) in Hong Kong, are the two most critical factors affecting the competitiveness of the port. I understand that the Port Master Plan 2020 which the Government is going to release later this year, would draw similar conclusions. I am glad that the industry has at last reached a consensus on the crucial factors that are eroding the competitiveness of the Hong Kong port.

I certainly support the proposed reforms mentioned in the McKinsey report. In essence, it mentions separate controls for boundary-crossing tractor, chassis, container and driver, and deleting/reducing the boundary crossing truck license fee. The traditional "four up- four down" requirement is obsolete and causes a lot of inefficiencies. Of course, it requires a lot of changes in the practices and systems of Mainland Customs, as well as additional resources in implementing the changes. The reforms, together with all other initiatives of the Government and the industries, such as boundary crossing infrastructure improvements, freight villages and bonded pipelines, relaxation of container truck driver licensing requirements, electronic document exchange, etc, would definitely enhance productivity and lower cost for carriage of cargo to Hong Kong.

However, unless a solution is found for the problem of high THC, the cost differential would continue to lead shippers to seek alternative routing for cargo. Despite container terminal operators in Hong Kong having repeatedly said that they had substantially lowered their charges in the past few years, carriers refuse to adjust the THC levels they charge shippers. The Council has been calling for transparency of THC because carriers insist that THC is a cost recovery exercise. Regrettably, progress on transparency has been very minimal. Only the Transpacific Stabilisation Agreement has provided the Council with a simple component list-other shipping conferences have not taken any positive moves. The TSA component list, however, lacks the essential costing figures to justify the current high levels of THC and a mechanism for level adjustment is also lacking.

We believe a new approach is needed to resolve this long-standing issue. Perhaps Hong Kong shippers and container terminal operators should consider a mechanism that allows shippers to pay directly to container terminal operators. There may be a separate charge for shipping lines which, of course, have to justify the charge. After all, shipping lines should, in principle, make their main revenue from ocean freight, and not from surcharges.

Moreover, there actually exists a similar threat of cargo losses for Hong Kong on the air side. One should never underestimate the potential competition from the new Baiyun Airport. According to a recent survey by GHK, commissioned by the Hong Kong Airport Authority, Hong Kong airport suffers from the disadvantages of substantially higher land transportation cost from cargo sources in South China, and terminal and handling fees. Although these disadvantages are at present offset by lower air freight charges from Hong Kong, this situation could easily change. Of course, to a certain extent, air freight charges are factored by successful cargo consolidation of which Hong Kong doubtlessly reigns supreme. Yet it also depends on how keen the operators are to develop a new market. Carriers and freight forwarders might offer very competitive rates to quickly build up critical mass. There is always the danger for air cargo to follow the same pattern in cargo diversion as sea cargo.

In order to ensure a sustainable growth for Hong Kong's air freight industry, the high terminal and handling costs, among others, must be reviewed. GHK's report indicates that terminal costs at Baiyun Airport is as low as RMB 0.50 per kg, which compares sharply with Hong Kong's current level of HK$1.72 per kg. One must remember that terminal and handling costs were more than 30% lower when we were using Kai Tak Airport. The franchise period for cargo terminal operators, the competition among them, etc, are factors that must be closely examined in exploring possibilities for lowering the charge. Indeed, the option of shippers paying directly to terminal operators should be considered if it would lead to lower charge levels for shippers.

There certainly has to be some urgency in quickly and substantially lowering operating costs in Hong Kong should we wish to sustain the competitiveness of Hong Kong's sea and air freight industries. Whilst the industry has still been enjoying very good results these past two years, there are a lot of obvious potential threats. The abolition of the quota system for textiles and garments in 2005 is going to cause a lot of cargo to be shipped directly from the Mainland. More container terminal capacity continues to come on-stream at Shenzhen ports. There is the least doubt that Baiyun Airport and Shenzhen Airport's share of South China cargo would increase sharply in the next few years. It is imperative for Hong Kong to lower operating costs here. Paying handling charges directly to terminal operators is an option that the industry should explore seriously.
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Old November 23rd, 2004, 06:59 AM   #65
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Old November 23rd, 2004, 07:05 AM   #66
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OnePort aims at colossal trucking problems with new suite of services

OnePort (www.OnePort.com) CEO, Dr Saimond Ip, was brought in as the 'strategist' for the e-commerce company set up by the terminals. His background serves him well, having been with McKinsey & Co for six years, advising multinational and local logistics technology companies on strategic and operational issues. He was also chairman of an e-commerce HKSE listed company and founder of three other technology companies, and of course, he's got his PhD in Management Information Systems from Cambridge University.

Dr Ip joined OnePort in June and was overseeing his first products launch in August, of a range of electronic services that included electronic terminal receipt, electronic trucking assignment, and track-and-trace for export containers. The products seem simple enough, but are aimed at the colossal trucking problem that plagues cross boundary cargo transport and threatens the Hong Kong port's overall competitiveness.

"I have been working with the Hong Kong Pearl River Delta Foundation for the past three years," of which he was Executive Director from May 2002-2004 with Mr Po Chung as chairman. The foundation is a private think tank set up with the objective of promoting the policy of bringing the PRD and Hong Kong closer together. "The foundation has always been set up as a two-year project. The objective was to get the two governments to set up a more permanent institution to carry on the initiatives of the foundation. The objective is to promote economic policies that would bring Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta closer together. I was actively involved in designing and lobbying of economic policies on cross boundary issues.

"Partly due to our efforts, the two governments now have a new framework called the Greater Pearl River Delta Business Council. Mr Victor Fung is Chairman of the Council and most of the trustees of the foundation are now members of the Council, including Mr C C Tung of OOIL, Mr Victor Lo and Mr Po Chung. From a private, small initiative, we are now an established joint government initiative."

It is in relation to his broader work at the Council that Dr. Ip is able to relate the OnePort initiatives that have just been launched. "This time last year, OnePort had launched the Empty Collection Appointment (ECA) which allows truckers to get container and seal numbers through the Internet or by cellphone. This saves as much as three days for the need to pick up empty containers in order to satisfy the US Customs advance notification rule before the cargo is loaded onboard the vessel."

OnePort's ECA customer base has grown to 800 trucking companies and 11 shipping lines. "Demand for ECA is increasing by some 50% each month. In July, we processed more than 2,000 ECA transactions. Some truckers make hundreds of appointments each month. The ECA service eliminates extra lift charges, extra haulage, and extra storage for truckers and shippers."

The second issue to be addressed by the launch of products in August this year is also related to trucking. A recent Better Hong Kong Foundation-commissioned study on "Restoring Hong Kong's Competitiveness as a Sea-trade Logistics Hub" and conducted by McKinsey, highlights the trucking inefficiencies that are undermining the Hong Kong port's competitiveness. According to the study, "Hong Kong's cross boundary trucking industry has entered a downward spiral and a new operating model is needed." The study says that many initiatives have been launched to counteract the severe decline of the crossboundary trucking industry but most of these have been focusing on improving waiting time for trucks at the Hong Kong Shenzhen boundary crossing.

The study went on to outline some of the root causes of Hong Kong's high trucking costs and one of these was the higher operating costs in Hong Kong which covers a wide range of factors such as parking, insurance, maintenance, a reflection of Hong Kong's structural cost base.

The new "Electronic Terminal Receipt" service OnePort launched in August addresses a cog in the wheel that sets off a chain of procedures that could be made more efficient. Each year Hong Kong's container terminals issue millions of terminal receipts to truck drivers for export containers. The truck drivers have to make a special trip to drop off the receipt which is then picked up by courier to bring to the freight forwarder and counters of shipping lines. It has not been unknown that a truck driver altogether forgets to drop off this innocuous little receipt before returning across the border, thus bogging down the whole process. OnePort's electronic terminal receipt speeds up the process and saves the industry millions of man-hours handling these papers. Terminal operators will send electronic terminal receipts to all the related parties and they can verify the information online. Truck drivers will not need another trip to drop off the paper-based terminal receipts. Over twenty trucking companies and freight forwarders have already signed up. Ricky Wong, Chairman of the Hong Kong Container Tractor Owner Association, said, "Our members are always under time pressure to send paper-based terminal receipts to their customers. Electronic terminal receipts take away that pressure."

OnePort's new suite of services is aimed at easing the traffic build-up at Kwai Chung by electronically streamlining the trucking processes there....

Another newly launched service is "Electronic Trucking Assignment" which enables online the process of faxing job orders to trucking companies. Shippers and freight forwarders used to fax job orders to trucking companies who take these papers to the container terminals and then wait for the data to be typed in at the gatehouse. OnePort's electronic trucking assignment allows the entire process to be completed online, allowing a trucker to use his Tractor ID card to go straight into the terminal. The two major terminal operators Hongkong International Terminals and Modern Terminals Limited support the launch of these electronic services, and believe that the electronic trucking assignment will enable the terminals to speed up the gatehouse operation and to reduce the overall time a tractor spends in the terminal.

The third service is meant for the shipper and is called Track-and-Trace. Once a shipper or freight-forwarder sends an electronic booking confirmation to a terminal, its status could be checked through track and trace at OnePort's website. Track-and-trace is essential to the freight forwarding business as more and more freight forwarders offer customers track and trace for their shipments via internet or customer messaging. OnePort enables them to provide more timely information to their customers. APL Logistics and several others have signed up to use the service.

"OnePort provides value-added information and related services to strengthen the competitive position of Hong Kong as a logistics sub," explains Dr. Ip. "Its primary focus is to improve the efficiency of container movements through the port of Hong Kong." Hence, the initiatives of OnePort will eventually be of community-wide use. The share-holders of OnePort include HIT, Modern Terminals, COSCO-HIT and Tradelink.

"We have agreement with Tradelink on linking up with their services in future. They are strong on electronic services for the trading industry. We focus on shipping, logistics and the supply chain. Tradelink is now moving toward the area of electronic manifest as used by shipping lines. We will eventually hook up with them for value added services. OnePort started with a suite of services called Equipment Exchange. We will leverage on our information link with the different parties. When we have launched these services, we would get into the value added services like E-man and other services Tradelink has to offer," said Dr. Ip.

For information on OnePort products, contact Philip Ho, marketing manager, OnePort Ltd, at tel 31018258.
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Old November 23rd, 2004, 03:23 PM   #67
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Inland Gate
Integrated feeder and terminal services in the PRD


Inland Gate service locations

With the cross boundary and trucking issues continuing to be problems to the export of containers through the Hong Kong port, forward-looking Modern Terminals (www.ModernTerminals.com) took the initiative in 2000 to find ways to exploit the more efficient barging system to Kwai Chung.

"A lot of cargo comes down from the PRD by barges so we decided to address the efficiency and competitiveness of the barge trade. We set up a small department consisting of operations staff of Modern Terminals to look into it, and to try and capture more business for Modern Terminals from the PRD region," said Jessie Chung, Assistant General Manager for Marketing and Logistics at MTL.

"As of today, we have 11 ports and 20 feeder terminals established in the Inland Gate service, powered by numerous allied feeder operators," said Hung Hin Chau, Logistics Manager for Modern Terminals. "The unique network of dedicated daily feeder services that we continue to expand, extends our terminal gates, both figuratively and literally, to the PRD. It forms a fast, efficient, cost-effective and reliable service to deliver our customers' import and export containers to their nominated mother vessels in Hong Kong, or to their final destinations in the PRD's major manufacturing and trading centres."

The name Inland Gate was expanded to cover trucking as well. "Inland Gate is a generic concept that means we move our gate virtually from Kwai Chung terminal all the way up to the PRDÐbe it a feeder terminal or an inland depot, be it in Shenzhen or Dongguan, we still call it a "gate" of Modern Terminals. We move our gate from Kwai Chung to southern China. So if that gate is located in feeder terminals in PRD tributaries, then it's Inland Gate barge services. And if the gate is located in an inland depot in Shenzhen and Dongguan, then it would be trucking services down to Modern Terminals. But originally it was purely barge services. We still focus on barges at the moment." said Chung.

Chung explains that Modern Terminals has been developing barge services for something like ten years now. "It has become quite mature and we have built up a good network of connecting many feeder terminals in the PRD with Modern Terminals. Originally, we only covered Guangdong province, but lately we've expanded it to Guangxi, still within PRD region. So Inland Gate now goes from the extreme western part of Guangdong province to Modern Terminals in Kwai Chung."

"We have been doing Inland Gate for three years and have been testing it out. We have established the feasibility of the project and based on this, we believe it is very good and should be adopted eventually by the port community. The first step would be to collaborate with other container terminals, that is, with HIT. We have formed a joint terminal task force to see if this concept, these services, could cover all terminals in Kwai Chung."

The Inland Gate project now covers more than 90% of the locations in the PRD. "Now it's time for us to expand the customer base. There are drawbacks and not everyone uses Inland Gate because it comprises separate agreements. Some are reluctant to give up the barge operators they have been dealing with for many years because of various reasons, such as price or familiarity with the operator, even if they are aware that Inland Gate services are feasible, saves time and resources. Moreover, it is a fairly new concept and there is still the inevitable 'wait-and-see' attitude about the kind of value or benefits the service would give them. Our people are in the depots at the PRD, making themselves available for tailormade services required by the shippers,"explains Chung.

"Inland Gate is purely a value-added service to help bring more cargo through Kwai Chung. We have two modes of operations. One is to appoint a batch contractor, to deliver the service, to deliver the boxes for our shipping line customers. In that sense, the shipping line simply deals with the terminal and does not really know which barge operator he uses, it is left up to us to appoint one of our partners. The shipping line pays strictly for the cost of the barging alone. We simply pass on the barge operator's charges to the shipping line. Inland Gate is a free service and we get nothing out of it," says Chung.

"The second option is that we form alliances with the barge operators that service the shipping line and we give them Inland Gate services such as real-time information once the boxes enter the feeder terminals. We connect our system with the feeder terminal and the barge operators. And most importantly, we try to provide priority berthing for these barge operators that service the shipping lines calling at Modern Terminals. By doing this, by collaborating with a few large companies of barge operators, we hope that they would concentrate more boxes with these operators and we can better consolidate the services. This would also provide better berthing time at the terminal in Kwai Chung. In this option, we provide them the services of Inland Gate for free. In the first option, we could provide a contractor for the shipping line, if that is what they choose. We make sure they have real-time information, priority berthing, and we deal with any barge operator problems directly.

"So basically the concept of Inland Gate is once you enter a depot that is in our network, you are within the Modern Terminals system. You can track your cargo down to the Hong Kong port. In other words, we take full responsibility for the transport of your cargo from the Pearl River Delta to Kwai Chung. We take care of the box-rom the time the shipper completes Customs clearance to its loading at Kwai Chung. We're also trying to promote the concept to the freight forwarder. If they are convinced that the cargo will get to Modern Terminals on schedule, then they will try to convince the shipping line to use Hong Kong as their port of choice," says Chung.

"Feedback from industry is quite positive, but there are some areas that can be quite delicate. There are relationships in place between operational staff and barge operators, between barge operators and the feeder terminals. They have been dealing with each other for many years, so unless the barge operator or the terminal is already within the Inland Gate network, then it would take some convincing for them to switch over to the Inland Gate network," says Chung.

"Faster time, and connection is guaranteed. The shipper would have to consider whether the cost gap between using Yantian and Hong Kong is probably not worthwhile, since there are more services in Hong Kong and a lot more advantages in shipping through the Hong Kong port. We are trying to lower the costs as much as possible and improve the efficiency of shipping through Hong Kong from the PRD," says Hung.

Trucking

"We are now studying the tucking processes from Shenzhen down to Huanggang and then down to MTL. We're trying to simplify the cross boundary processes, some parties are trying to convince both governments on either side of the border to relocate the Huanggang Chinese Customs to a designated depot that will choose to cooperate. The boundary processes need to be simplified so that there would be no need for clearance of containers at the border which would reduce queuing time," explains Chung.

"So once they cross the boundary, clearance would be done only at the designated depot which would have Customs there. So if we copy the Inland Gate barging service to trucking and depot processes, it would mean that we would have to contract or appoint the trucking companies. We would have to provide them real-time information, when they go through the boundary and come to the terminal. But for the trucking processes, our emphasis is not on the Inland Gate concept. Our emphasis is on how to simplify the processes, how to make it a 'green lane' for the trucking companies to pass through the boundary without stopping."

Hung says that trucking to Yantian port from Zhongshan in the western PRD costs $3,000, while to barge the container to Hong Kong would see an expense of below $1,000 for the barging and an additional $400 to $500 for inland trucking.
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Old November 25th, 2004, 11:20 PM   #68
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Determining factors for CT 10


Mar/Apr 2004

On the cost side, Christiansen cited the inefficiencies and discrepancies in crossborder trucking costs. He said Hong Kong had an overall cost disadvantage: on port construction charges, port charges, and total transportation cost that included trucking, THC, ocean freight.

A call for Hong Kong to play a part in the coordination of complex administrative structure in the southern China region was made by Martin Christiansen, Director of South China and Hong Kong, of Maersk Sealand shipping line, at a Pearl River Delta breakfast meeting discussion held by the German Industry and Commerce Hong Kong, South China, Vietnam, entitled "PRD Container Terminals, Upriver, Downriver or on Lantau?" at the Hong Kong Club in February.

Christiansen said there is a lack of unified infrastructure 'vision' for south China and the "One Market" approach is missing. He said there are too many stakeholders and Hong Kong must play a part in coordination in the region as it is too difficult to optimise in isolation. He enumerated the ongoing infrastructure plans: Shekou Phases II and III; Chiwan Phase I, CCT-Mawan; YICT Phase IIIB and Phase IV; Da Chan Bay, Nansha and Hong Kong's Container terminals 10. He said prioritization is needed.

The breakfast meeting discussed the feasibility of a Container Terminal 10 and Christiansen's conclusion was that the key determining factors of whether a CT 10 would be successful lay in the selection of site and other factors that determined cost and connectivity to both the eastern and western sides of the PRD.

On the question of the need for the additional capacity of CT 10 in the region, Christiansen said that it was absolutely essential in order to meet the burgeoning south China manufacturing boom. "South China is turning into the factory floor of the world and significant infrastructure development is needed to support the growth."

Christiansen said there has been significant shifting of sourcing from the US, Europe and South and North East Asia that is still ongoing. "PRD sourcing now is not only for the big multinationals, but medium and small enterprises are also moving production into southern China." The continuous upgrading of skills in the manufacturing region has led to the widening range of products. He said the end of the quota regime would further accelerate migration to the region.

"Year-on-year container growth for southern China from 2008 onwards is estimated to be at least 4 mn TEUs per annum," he said.

Christiansen said significant infrastructure developments are needed to support the growth and avoid bottlenecks. He cited some of Hong Kong's structural disadvantages that should be tackled so that CT 10, if constructed, would be successful and Hong Kong could remain competitive. He said these included the Western Corridor link that would help but not sufficiently. The question over the Zhuhai/Macau /Hong Kong bridge remains and there is a lack of efficient 24-7 border crossings. Customs rules should be simplified along with improved 24-7 Customs handling. He also sees a need for barge optimisation.

On the cost side, Christiansen cited the inefficiencies and discrepancies in crossborder trucking costs. He said Hong Kong had an overall cost disadvantage: on port construction charges, port charges, and total transportation cost that included trucking, THC, ocean freight.

He said that eventually there would be cost convergence but that it would not happen overnight.

Christiansen, who is with the world's largest container shipping line, Maersk Sealand, enumerated the basis on which terminal selection is conducted by carriers:

Pearl River Delta
Advantages
* "Low" terminal infrastructure cost
* Cost of operation
* Location close to production market

Disadvantages
* Customs regulations
* Experience/flexibility
* Connectivity/services

Northwest Lantau
Advantages
* Connectivity to Zhuhai/Macau-Hong Kong bridge
* Greenfield operation
* Free port status

Disadvantages
* Split operation
* Environmental impact
* High infrastructure cost compared to PRD

SW Tsing Yi
Advantages
* Connectivity to CT 1-9
* Barge optimisation
* Free port status

Disadvantages
* Cost
* Distance from production market
* Flexibility/experience

Christiansen said that for a carrier, Tsing Yi would be the preferred location due to its connectivity to existing terminal facilities. He explained that split operations would be more expensive and have less flexibility.

The above presentation, entitled "PRD Container Terminals Upriver or Downriver or Lantau?" can be obtained from the Dutch Business Association.
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Old November 26th, 2004, 05:06 AM   #69
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Hong Kong port, airport show high increases in cargo handling for Oct. 04



Hong Kong’s container throughput handling from Jan-Oct this year has reached 18.4mn TEUs an increase of 9.1% over the same period last year. Some 11.112mn TEUs were handled at the Kwai Chung terminals for Jan-Oct 04, a rise of 10.9% over the same period last year. For the month of October, a total of 1.25mn TEUS were handled at the Kwai Chung terminals, a rise of 21.9% over Oct 03.

Meanwhile, the Shenzhen ports recorded a year-on-year growth of 28.9% for Jan-Oct 04, handling a total of 11.17mn TEUs for the period, according to the latest figures compiled by the Port Development Council from statistics of the Census & Statistics Department, the Marine Department, and the Hong Kong Shippers’ Council.

Meanwhile, for two months in a row, air cargo throughput at Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) has set new records. October figures grew by 14.6% over last year to 299,000 tonnes, representing a 7% increase over the previous record of 280,000 tonnes achieved in September. Robust cargo growth has been driven by continued strong demand for goods from North America, Europe and Mainland China. Exports (loaded cargo) rose to 195,000 tonnes, a gain of 16.1% over last year, while imports (unloaded cargo) grew by 11.8% to 104,000 tonnes. Both are all-time-high monthly records. Riding on the strong demand for air cargo services, total aircraft movements rose by 12.2% to 21,035, marking October the busiest month ever for aircraft movements at HKIA.

Air cargo throughput for the past 12 months rose to 3,042,000 tonnes, growing 17.3% over the corresponding period of last year.
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Old November 29th, 2004, 06:02 PM   #70
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Lloyd's List
November 29, 2004
HK register hits 25m gt

Hong Kong's shipping register has broken through 25m gt nearly two months ahead of the forecast set by the Marine Department, writes Keith Wallis in Hong Kong.

The department said 997 ships totalling 25.3m gt are registered.

Among the most recent entrants are the 1989-built 15,903 gt ro-ro cargo vessel Lykes Sprinter and the 3,994 gt boxship Jin Teng.

Lykes Sprinterwas bought by Hong Kong's Xun Da International Shipping earlier this month, while the 1994-built Jin Teng is owned by Sinotrans Shipping, also based in Hong Kong.

The shipping register was set to surpass the 25m gt mark a few months ago, but the booming sale and purchase market led to a number of defections to rival registers, slowing expansion.

But the Marine Department pointed out that growth since the middle of this year has been significant.

In July, total tonnage on the register topped 24.07m gt. It was then the Marine Department believed the register would exceed 25m gt by the end of this year. Speaking at the time Marine Department director Tsui Shung-yiu said 40 vessels totalling about 1m gt would be added in the coming months.

The number of vessels currently on the register is about four times the number in 1997 when shipowners re-flagged their ships out of Hong Kong amid concern about the impact of Hong Kong's handover to China.
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Old November 30th, 2004, 07:59 AM   #71
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HK Sun Hung Kai Ppties Sells 57% ACT Stake To PSA
29 November 2004

HONG KONG (Dow Jones)--Sun Hung Kai Properties Ltd. (0016.HK) said Tuesday it sold its 57% stake in Asia Container Terminals Ltd., one of Hong Kong's port operators, to Singapore's state-owned PSA International.

Sun Hung Kai Properties, a blue chip developer, declined to name the price, but said the sale fetched a "very satisfactory return."

The South China Morning Post, quoting a source close to the deal, reported Tuesday that PSA paid HK$2 billion in cash and assumed HK$600 million in debt.

"PSA has agreed to buy the 57% stake in Asia Container Terminals Ltd. from Sun Hung Kai Properties," a PSA spokesman said without providing further details.

Sun Hung Kai's stake comprises a long-term holding of 28.5%, and an additional 28.5% it acquired from Hongkong Land Holdings Ltd. (H78.SG) on Nov. 19.

Sun Hung Kai's spokeswoman said the company is optimistic about the future of the logistics industry, and will maintain its current strategy in logistics and infrastructure.

The spokeswoman also said the company will keep looking for other logistics and related investment and management opportunities in Hong Kong and mainland China.

PSA is also bidding for another stake in ACT. CSX World Terminals, another ACT shareholder and the ports arm of U.S. railway operator CSX Corp. (CSX), is in the process of disposing of its 17% stake in ACT.

ACT began its two berth-operation at Hong Kong's Kwai Chung Port in mid-2004, with a total stacking capacity of 36,414 twenty-foot equivalent units.

The terminal's founding shareholders were Hongkong Land Holdings, Sun Hung Kai Properties, CSX World Terminals and NWS Holdings Ltd. (0659.HK).

PSA operates 17 ports in 11 countries across Europe, India, China and east Asia. This is the first time PSA has entered the Hong Kong market.


PSA grabs port stake for $2.6b - SHKP sells its 57pc stake in Asia Container to the Singapore firm, 10 days after thwarting a bid to gain a foothold in HK
Russell Barling and Nichole Chan
30 November 2004
South China Morning Post

PSA International will pay at least $2.6 billion for majority control of Asia Container Terminals (ACT), giving Singapore's state-owned port operator the strategic foothold in Hong Kong's port that it has long coveted.

PSA will acquire 57 per cent of ACT from Sun Hung Kai Properties (SHKP) just 10 days after Hong Kong's biggest property developer blocked its initial bid for a piece of the Kwai Chung terminal operator.

"Sun Hung Kai Properties has agreed to sell its 57 per cent stake in ACT to the PSA for a very satisfactory return," a SHKP spokeswoman said. She declined to provide further details.

According to a source close to the deal, PSA made a cash offer of "more than $2 billion". It also assumes SHKP's portion of ACT's debt, which is estimated at $600 million.

PSA and SHKP, which is expected to turn a $1 billion profit from the disposal, are expected to announce the deal later this week once the deadline passes for ACT's two other shareholders to match the offer.

It is understood NWS Holdings and CSX World Terminals (Hong Kong) have said they will not match PSA's offer.

Earlier this month, PSA's $685 million bid for Hongkong Land Holdings' 28.5 per cent stake in ACT was trumped at the last moment by SHKP, which exercised its right as a shareholder to match any bids from firms outside the ACT consortium.

The move, viewed at the time as an instance of Hong Kong Inc circling the wagons against Singapore, now appears a shrewd intervention to increase the premium PSA has to pay to get its first foothold in the world's busiest container port.

In November 2001, CSX World Terminals paid $242.3 million for convertible shares in ACT, which increased its stake by 19.5 per cent. That acquisition valued ACT's 50-year concession for the two berths known as CT8 West at Kwai Chung at $1.24 billion.

PSA is apparently willing to pay about $2.6 billion for a controlling 57 per cent of ACT, a company that has yet to sign its first customer despite having taken possession of the two berths at CT8 West in March.

"Sun Hung Kai knew PSA desperately wanted it," an ACT shareholder said yesterday.

PSA also emerged yesterday as one of three companies in the running to buy the global port assets of US rail giant CSX Corp, which owns an effective 17 per cent in ACT.

PSA, Hutchison Whampoa's international port investment arm and the partnership of Wharf Group and APM Terminals are understood to have bid more than US$1 billion for CSX's global ports network.

"There are folks that truly believe the scarcity [of major port assets for sale] and strategic value of [CSX's] assets make them worth a lot more than the book price," an executive close to the CSX disposal said.

Finalists NWS Holdings and China Merchants are believed to have bid below the US$1 billion threshold and are no longer in the running.

Firms were required to bid for the whole CSX network - which also includes a majority stake in CT3 at Kwai Chung and existing terminals or undeveloped sites in the ports of Tianjin, Yantai and Qingdao on the mainland and Busan in South Korea - to reach the final stage of the sale.

A decision on the winner of the CSX sell-off is expected by the end of next week. PSA and Hutchison declined comment.
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Old December 1st, 2004, 09:40 PM   #72
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Singapore port buys big stake in rival Hong Kong terminal
PSA pays hefty price to gain a foothold in world’s largest box port, write Marcus Hand in Singapore and Sam Chambers in Hong Kong
1 December 2004
Lloyd's List

SINGAPORE terminal operator PSA International has broken into the rival port of Hong Kong paying a hefty price for a 57% stake in Asia Container Terminals.

“PSA has agreed to buy the 57% stake in Asia Container Terminals Ltd from Sun Hung Kai Properties,” a PSA corporate spokesman confirmed yesterday. ACT controls two berths at CT8 in Kwai Chung.

PSA did not comment on the price which was reported by the South China Morning Post at HK$2bn (US$256m) or more in cash plus an estimated HK$600m in ACT’s debt, while SHKP merely said it was getting a “satisfactory return”.

“That is a very good return for them,” an industry source said.

Just two weeks ago, SHKP trumped a HK$685m bid from PSA for Hong Kong Land Holding’s 28.5% stake in ACT increasing its own stake to 57%.

It would appear to have been a shrewd move on the part of the Hong Kong property company which saw an opportunity to profit from PSA’s extreme keenness to break into the Hong Kong market.

The deal will give PSA a strategic foothold in Hong Kong, the world’s largest container port, and literally on the doorstep of its largest rival on a global basis Hutchison Port Holdings, whose original flagship facility, Hongkong International Terminals, is the dominant operator in Kwai Chung.

However the terminal it has bought into is largely moribund with ACT failing to sign up any customers since it took over the two berths at CT8 in March this year.

Whether PSA can leverage on its relationships with customers at other ports remains to be seen.

Will the entrance of PSA make Hong Kong container port, the world’s most expensive, more competitive?

Sunny Ho, executive director at the Hong Kong Shippers Council, certainly thinks so: “It will certainly lead to a more competitive environment,” he said.

He noted that the weakness of ACT in the past had been the lack of shareholders with shipping backgrounds to secure business.

“PSA has an advantage in that the Singapore government is a major shareholder in it as well as shipping line giant NOL; therefore they have a very good chance in securing business from the New World Alliance,” he said, referring to the group comprising NOL, Hyundai Merchant Marine and Mitsui OSK Lines.

The NWA currently calls at Hutchison’s HIT.

Conceivably, APL, NOL’s container arm, could transfer its transpacific service from Yantian in Shenzhen.

However, the two berths at CT8 are limited in capacity, with combined throughput of 1.4m teu. Even if PSA won CT3 from CSX, that would only give it roughly 2.7m teu of capacity, not enough to accommodate an entire alliance.

China Ocean Shipping Co, which has been keen to co-operate with PSA elsewhere, already has its own terminal in Hong Kong.

There are some Singapore companies which have in the past shown a loyalty to the state-owned port operator — Pacific International Lines was one its first customers both for Aden Container Terminal and Guangzhou Container Terminal.
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Old December 5th, 2004, 07:57 PM   #73
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Cargo ports fouling air, says expert
Paris Lord, Hong Kong Standard
December 6, 2004


Pollution linked to the Kwai Chung container terminal, above, is increasingly affecting Hong Kong, says a scientist. AFP

Air pollution from ships may increase as more container terminals open in and around Hong Kong, an atmospheric scientist fears.

While the maritime sector's contribution to the territory's total air pollution is small compared to vehicular traffic, its effects can be found in Kwai Chung and even Sha Tin, University of Science and Technology professor Alexis Lau said.

Emission standards worldwide will be tightened from next May and gradually become more stringent, a shipping industry official said.

Improvements in fuel standards and emission reduction devices mean local vehicles' contributions of hazardous elemental carbons such as nickel and vanadium are falling.

But maritime pollution sources are increasing, said Lau, who is the acting director of the university's Centre for Coastal and Atmospheric Research. "The area affected covers much of the Kowloon peninsula, so although the effect is not much in absolute terms, it's a cause for concern," he said.

"When you compound that with the container ports that are being built around Hong Kong, people should seriously look at this."

Hong Kong has nine container terminals and the government has proposed building a 10th. Its location and start date have not been decided. Shenzhen has three main container ports and these are expanding.

"This is a problem because ocean-going vessels use bunker fuel, the lowest grade of fuel you can have," Lau said.

Marine Department figures show that there were 17,650 ocean vessel arrivals in the first half of this year, and 93,250 river vessel arrivals.

Lau said an examination of Environmental Protection Department data over several years showed a rising trend of container ships in local waters leaving their "signature" on Kwai Chung, Mong Kok and Sha Tin. "The strongest signal is in the summer, because the summer wind blows it inland," Lau said. "That's very strange, because most of our other pollution problems are strongest in winter."

According to the 1990-2002 Hong Kong air pollutant emission inventory compiled by the EPD, all pollutants made by "navigation" sources - including international container ships and local and Pearl River Delta ferries - have increased since 1990.

This is despite a dramatic drop in pollutants created by power companies and motor vehicles.

In any event, fuel standards for marine vessels are weaker than for land vehicles.

According to the International Maritime Organisation's International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships , which comes into effect worldwide in May, fuel oil must not exceed 4.5 per cent sulphur content.

That compares with 0.5 per cent sulphur content rate for land-based industrial vehicles, Lam said.

The Marine Department is working on new laws in order to comply with ship pollution standards within Hong Kong waters, and expects to present them to legislators early next year.
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Old December 6th, 2004, 06:24 PM   #74
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Source : http://www.fotop.net/garrey/cityscape







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Old December 11th, 2004, 06:42 PM   #75
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Dubai Buys CSX Ports for $1.15 Billion
Thu Dec 9, 4:16 AM ET
By Alison Leung

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Dubai is paying $1.15 billion for the global port assets of U.S.-based CSX Corp., outbidding the world's two biggest container port operators for terminals in Hong Kong and China as the region's trade soars.

Dubai Ports International, the investment arm of the state-owned Dubai Port Authority, was a late entrant and edged out bidders including Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. and Singapore's PSA International in a deal announced on Thursday for CSX's terminals and logistics assets.

The deal -- which includes terminals in Hong Kong, the world's busiest container port, and in booming China -- make the Dubai company the sixth-largest port operator in the world.

"It's not cheap. It seems that a ports bubble is building up right now," said BOC International analyst Michael Chan.

Soaring global trade, driven by China's rise as a manufacturing powerhouse, has created boom times for the shipping industry. Freight rates are hitting record highs and many of the world's container ports are heavily congested.

"Definitely China is the biggest growth area," Dubai Ports Executive Chairman Ahmed Bin Sulayem told a news conference in Hong Kong.

Managing Director Mohammed Sharaf said it was too early to say whether Dubai Ports would sell some of the assets, after the South China Morning Post reported the company may be planning to offload the Asia operations of CSX to Hutchison.

Dubai Ports operates terminals in the Middle East, Romania, Malaysia and India. It lost a bid for a Thai container terminal project to Hutchison earlier this year.

END OF FOREIGN ROAD FOR CSX

The transaction means CSX, the third-largest U.S. railroad operator, has completed its sale of non-rail operations and will no longer own assets outside the United States.

"Beginning in 2000, CSX began a series of divestitures of its non-rail assets. This is the company we held the longest because it is the best," said Andy Fogarty, president and chief executive officer of CSX World Terminals.

The deal includes 9 terminals with combined future capacity of 14.6 million 20-foot equivalent units (TEUs) in Hong Kong, Yantai and Tianjin in China, Adelaide in Australia, Venezuela and the Dominican Republic.

The transaction, expected to complete in the first quarter, gives Dubai Ports a controlling stake in the highly profitable container Terminal No. 3 at Hong Kong's main Kwai Chung Container Port.

It will also take over CSX World's 29.5 percent stake in Asia Container Terminals (ACT), the operator of two berths in Kwai Chung's CT8 West, and its interest in logistics businesses in Hong Kong and China.

Dubai Ports will also get a 25 percent interest in South Korea's Pusan Newport, with a capacity of 5.5 million TEUs that is expected to start operations in 2006.

Bin Sulayem said earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) for the CSX assets were expected to double in the next five years, but he would not give a figure.

The transaction will be financed from a committed loan facility arranged and underwritten by Deutsche Bank.

Singapore state-controlled PSA International Pte. Ltd. was reported by local media to have offered about US$1 billion for the assets. It bought 57 percent of ACT from Sun Hung Kai Properties last month for its first port holding in Hong Kong.

Other bidders included Hong Kong's two major port operators, Hutchison and Wharf (Holdings) Ltd.'s Modern Terminals Ltd. Hong Kong-listed COSCO Pacific Ltd., China Merchants Holdings (International) Co. Ltd., NWS Holdings Ltd. and Sun Hung Kai also bid.
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Old December 12th, 2004, 10:57 AM   #76
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Statistics on Vessels, Port Cargo and Containers for the Third Quarter of 2004
Friday, December 10, 2004

The Census and Statistics Department today released statistics on vessels, port cargo and containers for the third quarter of 2004.

In the third quarter of 2004, total port cargo throughput increased by 6% over a year earlier to 55.1 million tonnes. Within this total, inward port cargo increased by 6% to 33.6 million tonnes, while outward port cargo also rose by 6% to 21.5 million tonnes.

For the first nine months of 2004 as a whole, total port cargo throughput increased by 9% to 165.9 million tonnes over the same period in 2003. Within this total, inward port cargo was up by 8% to 102.2 million tonnes, while outward port cargo also rose by 10% to 63.7 million tonnes.

On a seasonally adjusted quarter-to-quarter comparison, total port cargo throughput was up by 1% in the third quarter of 2004. Within this total, inward port cargo recorded virtually no change, while outward port cargo increased by 3%. The seasonally adjusted series enables more meaningful shorter-term comparison to be made for discerning possible variations in trends.

Port cargo

Within port cargo, seaborne and river cargo went up by 9% and 1% over a year earlier to 40.1 million tonnes and 15.1 million tonnes respectively in the third quarter of 2004.

Within inward port cargo, imports decreased by 3% over a year earlier to 20.0 million tonnes in the third quarter of 2004, while inward transhipment surged by 24% to 13.6 million tonnes. For outward port cargo, exports (including domestic exports and re-exports) and outward transhipment rose by 4% and 8% to 9.2 million tonnes and 12.3 million tonnes respectively.

Within port cargo, seaborne cargo went up by 10% in the first nine months of 2004 over a year earlier to 119.8 million tonnes, while river cargo also increased by 7% to 46.1 million tonnes.

Within inward port cargo, imports rose by 2% in the first nine months of 2004 over a year earlier to 62.7 million tonnes, while inward transhipment surged by 21% to 39.5 million tonnes. For outward port cargo, exports increased by 11% to 26.7 million tonnes, while outward transhipment was up by 9% to 37.0 million tonnes.

The detailed port cargo statistics are summarised in Table 1(text version of table 1).

The main countries/territories of loading for inward port cargo and countries/territories of discharge for outward port cargo are shown in Table 2 (text version of table 2)and Table 3 (text version of table 3)respectively.

Comparing the third quarter of 2004 with the third quarter of 2003, double-digit increases were recorded in the tonnage of inward port cargo loaded in Malaysia (+26%), the United States (+21%), and Thailand (+14%). Over the same period, double-digit increases were registered in the tonnage of outward port cargo for discharge in Malaysia (+35%), Singapore (+32%), Australia (+32%), the United States (+13%) and Germany (+11%). On the other hand, a double-digit decrease was recorded in the tonnage of outward port cargo discharged in Taiwan (-17%).

Comparing the first nine months of 2004 with the same period in 2003, double-digit increases were recorded in the tonnage of inward port cargo loaded in Australia (+46%), Malaysia (+27%), Singapore (+24%), the United States (+17%) and the Republic of Korea (+14%). Over the same period, double-digit increases were registered in the tonnage of outward port cargo for discharge in Australia (+44%), Singapore (+27%) and Malaysia (+18%).

Comparing the third quarter of 2004 with the third quarter of 2003, double-digit increases were recorded in inward port cargo of "machinery" (+28%), "textile yarn, fabrics, made-up articles and related products" (+22%), "artificial resins and plastic materials" (+20%) and "bricks, ceramic tile and refractory construction materials" (+20%). On the other hand, double-digit decreases were recorded for "stone, sand and gravel" (-30%) and "iron and steel" (-18%). As for outward port cargo, double-digit increases were recorded for "tools, cutlery, metal household ware and manufactures" (+25%), "machinery" (+23%) and "bricks, ceramic tile and refractory construction materials" (+23%). On the other hand, double-digit decreases were recorded for "metalliferous ores and metal scrap" (-22%) and "iron and steel" (-11%).

Comparing the first nine months of 2004 with the same period in 2003, double-digit increases were recorded in inward port cargo of "bricks, ceramic tile and refractory construction materials" (+33%), "machinery" (+24%), "metalliferous ores and metal scrap" (+22%), "textile yarn, fabrics, made-up articles and related products" (+19%), "artificial resins and plastic materials" (+17%) and "petroleum, petroleum products and related materials" (+15%). On the other hand, a double-digit decrease was recorded for "stone, sand and gravel" (-21%). As for outward port cargo, double-digit increases were recorded for "bricks, ceramic tile and refractory construction materials" (+32%), "machinery" (+21%), "artificial resins and plastic materials" (+14%), "organic chemicals" (+11%) and "pulp and waste paper" (+10%).

Containers

In the third quarter of 2004, the port of Hong Kong handled 5.8 million TEUs of containers, representing an increase of 9% over a year earlier. Within this total, laden containers and empty containers rose by 9% to 4.6 million TEUs and 10% to 1.2 million TEUs respectively. Among laden containers, inward and outward containers were up by 16% and 4% in the third quarter of 2004 over a year earlier to 2.2 million TEUs and 2.4 million TEUs respectively.

For the first nine months of 2004 as a whole, the port of Hong Kong handled 16.4 million TEUs of containers, representing an increase of 9% over the same period in 2003. Within this total, laden containers rose by 10% to 13.4 million TEUs, while empty containers increased by 3% to 3.0 million TEUs. Among laden containers, inward and outward containers were up by 15% and 6% in the first nine months of 2004 over a year earlier to 6.4 million TEUs and 7.0 million TEUs respectively.

On a seasonally adjusted quarter-to-quarter comparison, laden container throughput increased by 3% in the third quarter of 2004, comprising increases of 4% and 2% respectively for inward and outward laden containers.

Seaborne laden containers went up by 11% in the third quarter of 2004 over a year earlier to 3.6 million TEUs, while river laden containers increased by 4% to 1.1 million TEUs.

Within inward laden containers, imports increased by 10% to 1.0 million TEUs, while inward transhipment surged by 21% to 1.2 million TEUs in the third quarter of 2004 over the same period in 2003. For outward laden containers, exports rose by 3% to 1.3 million TEUs, while outward transhipment increased by 5% to 1.2 million TEUs.

Seaborne laden containers went up by 10% to 10.2 million TEUs in the first nine months of 2004 over the same period in 2003, while river laden containers also increased by 10% to 3.2 million TEUs.

Within inward laden containers, imports and inward transhipment amounted to 2.8 million TEUs and 3.6 million TEUs respectively in the first nine months of 2004, representing increases of 10% and 19% over the same period in 2003. For outward laden containers, exports amounted to 3.5 million TEUs in the first nine months of 2004, representing an increase of 7% over the same period in 2003, while outward transhipment rose by 5% to 3.5 million TEUs.

Port cargo and laden container statistics are compiled from a sample of consignments listed in the cargo manifests supplied by shipping companies or agents to the Census and Statistics Department.

Vessel arrivals

In the third quarter of 2004, the number of ocean vessel arrivals decreased by 1% over a year earlier to 8 860, with the total capacity recording virtually no change over a year earlier to 76.3 million net registered tons. Over the same period, the number of river vessel arrivals was up by 6% to 48 430, with the total capacity increasing by 9% to 23.5 million net registered tons.

In the first nine months of 2004, the number of ocean vessel arrivals recorded virtually no change over a year earlier to 26 520, with the total capacity increasing by 4% to 230.4 million net registered tons. Over the same period, the number of river vessel arrivals was up by 5% to 141 680, with the total capacity increasing by 8% to 68.1 million net registered tons.
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Old December 12th, 2004, 11:05 AM   #77
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I don't know why but the container idea and system is so cool.
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Old December 17th, 2004, 06:23 AM   #78
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South China Morning Post
December 16, 2004
HK cruising to cargo record
Russell Barling

Hong Kong will set another global benchmark for containerised cargo this year, with about 22 million boxes expected to have crossed its docks by the end of
the month despite intense competition from low-cost rivals in Shenzhen.

After cutting their prices for handling vessel-to-vessel relay cargo, the main terminal operators in Kwai Chung rebounded from a weak first quarter to move 12.27 million teu (20-foot equivalent units) in the first 11 months, up a comparative 11.3 per cent. They moved 12.07 million boxes during all of
last year.

"November was another good month. Kwai Chung has absorbed 33 per cent of the overall market growth in the Pearl River Delta so far this year and that is a
very good performance for Hong Kong," said Eric Bogh Christensen, the managing director of Modern Terminals, the port's No2 operator.

"It is particularly impressive when you consider there has been no increase in cross-border trucking. There's a big increase in trucked volumes in Shenzhen, but we're not seeing any of it."

Hong Kong for the past few years has been steadily losing direct import and export shipments, the highest value sector of the market based on the contribution they make to local economies, to the ports across the border due to a US$ 300 per-box cost differential compared with terminals in Shenzhen.

"We remain very concerned about the direct import-export cargo," Mr Christensen said. "It's just not coming."

About US$ 100 of the differential is attributable to higher terminal handling fees, with the remainder due to higher trucking costs of transporting goods to Hong Kong from south China's key manufacturing centres such as Dongguan.

Overall throughput at the port reached 20.17 teu in the first 11 months, up 8.5 per cent year on year.

But, while the main terminals' more competitive pricing policies in some sectors breathed new life into their businesses, it has in part come at the expense of mid-stream and river trade operators. Aggregate growth in mid-stream and river trade volumes slowed to 4.3 per cent for the year, or 7.9 million teu, after peaking at 25.5 per cent in the first three months.

The port handled 1.81 million boxes last month, up 3.3 per cent from November last year.
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Old December 19th, 2004, 09:09 AM   #79
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Containers on the rise as resurgence rocks the doubters
But the ability to hold off Chinese competition could be compromised by high terminal handling costs and increased freight rates
13 December 2004
Lloyd's List

SOARING growth in box throughput volumes, completion of additional terminal facilities and turmoil among existing operators that led to Singapore’s PSA Corp gaining a foothold, have made the past 12 months in Hong Kong among the most memorable.

The resurgence in container throughput has surprised those who believed the nearby Shenzhen ports in southern China would continue to bite into Hong Kong’s competitiveness as the world’s busiest container port.

Provisional figures from the Port Development Council show box volumes climbed 9.1% in the first 10 months of this year to 18.38m teu, of which the nine Kwai Chung container terminals accounted for 11.1m teu.

This compared with a 1.5% drop in total container throughput volumes for the whole of 2001, 7.4% growth in 2002 and 6.8% in 2003.

The government-sponsored council said there were particularly strong results in October when container throughput rose 11.3% to 1.97m teu, compared with a year earlier.

Industry observers said that although container volumes had been growing at a faster clip at the Shenzhen terminals, which mainly comprise Yantian, Shekou and Chiwan, handling fees and freight rates had also been increasing.

This had narrowed the cost competitiveness of the Shenzhen ports.

The higher cost of transporting containers from the factories in southern China to Hong Kong, coupled with the territory’s more expensive terminal handling charges, were partly offset by the wider range of liner calls offered by Kwai Chung port.

But commentators still see the higher cost of using Hong Kong port as a key issue that holds back Hong Kong’s ability to properly compete with the Shenzhen ports.

Modern Terminals managing director, Erik Christensen, says: “We have an excellent free port with the world-class expertise and efficiency in container terminal management and operations, as well as state-of-the-art technology and equipment. Here, shippers enjoy flexible shipping services with frequent calls to destinations all over the world.”

But he also points out that shippers using the Shenzhen ports enjoy a $300 per teu cost advantage compared with those shipping cargo through Hong Kong.

“Two factors contribute to the gap: higher trucking costs for cargo sent to Hong Kong, which accounts for two-thirds of the difference, and higher THCs levied by shipping lines for cargo loaded in Hong Kong,” Mr Christensen says.

He adds: “It is clear that Hong Kong must first remove the structural disadvantages of higher trucking costs and THCs in order to restore growth in container throughput.”

Alan Lee, chairman of the Hong Kong Container Terminal Operators Association, added that the high trucking and terminal handling charges, “are issues that we must resolve. If we don’t the growth in container traffic in Hong Kong will have a problem in the next five years and we will be losing out to [southern China] container terminals.”

While the Hong Kong government has been loath to step into what it sees as commercial issues to resolve the problem of high THCs, it has been more proactive in seeking ways to reduce trucking costs.

Officials have met with industry groups, including the Hong Kong Container Terminal Operators Association, and held talks with their counterparts in China to help ease the rules governing cross-boundary trucking.

Mr Christensen believes the boom in box volumes has been driven by transhipment, including barge traffic mainly from the less accessible western side of the Pearl River delta.

He estimates that the volume of boxes moved to Hong Kong by barge for onward shipment has risen by a compound rate of 18% a year between 2000 and 2004.

“We project the barge cargo segment to continue to grow by 15%-20% a year over the next five years,” Mr Christensen says.

The expansion in volumes has coincided with the completion of the $510m container terminal nine development on Tsing Yi.

Operation of the facility’s six berths, including two which specifically handle barges, is split between Modern Terminals and Hongkong International Terminals, the local subsidiary of global terminal operator, Hutchison Port Holdings.

Initially, facing an uncertain future when construction started in 2000, the completion of container terminal nine and the surge in volumes has spurred talk about the development of future terminal facilities.

The government, which shortlisted two possible sites for extra port facilities a few years ago, recently lodged a draft executive summary of its 2020 port master plan with local legislators.

The plan, which is also out for public consultation, suggests future port facilities should be built at either south-west Tsing Yi, one of the areas previously selected by government, or north-west Lantau Island.

Whatever the eventual results, they are unlikely to benefit two existing players — CSX World Terminals and the River Trade Terminal Co.

CSX World Terminals, part of the US transport giant, is disposing of its interest in container terminal three as part of a worldwide sell-off of its port investments.

RTT is also facing an uncertain future after losing a court case, which meant it would have continued to handle intra-Asian container vessels in additional to river feeders.
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Old December 22nd, 2004, 05:04 AM   #80
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Source : http://www.fotop.net/garrey/conterminal







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