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Old May 9th, 2005, 07:55 AM   #41
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^ EXACTLY! Or make the whole thing a tunnel for all I care, though that would take a long time to build...

I love the idea of linking these three cities together, but do it with some style, not a causeway. Causeways say "I refuse to put ANY thought into this bridge, just make it as cheap and ugly as possible!"
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Old May 10th, 2005, 08:05 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raymond_tung88
Wait a minute, Macau drives on the left (like in China, continental Europe, and North America) while Zhuhai drives on the right (like in HK, Britain, Japan)? That's really weird and messed up. I always thought Zhuhai would drive the same way China would seeing how is FULLY is part of the PRC.
China: steer on the left, drive on the right

HK Macau: Steer on the right, drive on the left.

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Old May 12th, 2005, 09:49 PM   #43
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May 9, 2005
Government Press Release
'Wild speculation' on bridge project refuted

The Environment, Transport & Works Bureau has rejected as "wild speculation" media reports that the local section of the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge will not meet environmental standards and that legal exemption would be required.

A newspaper reported today that an environmental impact assessment has found the project cannot meet the air quality requirement. It suggested that an exemption from the assessment ordinance would have to be sought from the Executive Council.

The bureau clarified that an assessment cannot yet be conducted as planning for the bridge is ongoing. It said only after such major decisions have been made can the various assessments, including one on air quality, be conducted.
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Old May 12th, 2005, 09:59 PM   #44
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very interesting!! And impressive!! that's a HUGe bridge!!On eof my future projects is to visit Macao, HK! It's amazing how HK's surface is so much bigger than Macao's!! I didn't know that!

Just an historical note : Portugal drove on the left (like the UK) until the 1920s. It changed in most of the Portuguese world by then, except for Mozambique and Macao, because of the proximity to English-speaking and therefore countries driving on the left.
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Old May 24th, 2005, 02:48 AM   #45
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Consultants to flesh out details of cross-delta bridge



A conceptual design for the bridge that will link Hong Kong, Zhuhai and Macau is to be developed soon, with the costs split evenly among the three governments.
Transport officials in Hong Kong are to ask lawmakers for $26.8 million next month for employing consultants to draw up the design and to carry out a series of technical studies.

The project is projected to cost 72.8 million yuan.

The details were released in a government paper issued to lawmakers yesterday ahead of a transport panel meeting on Friday. Officials are to approach the public works subcommittee of the Finance Committee for funding next month.

The conceptual design will cover the main bridge, boundary-crossing facilities and connecting roads to help define the requirements and scope of the project.

After a feasibility study of the bridge, a group of experts from the mainland, Hong Kong and Macau assessed three proposed alignments of the bridge.

They found the northern option, which includes a bridge and tunnel, would cause the least damage to the natural shoreline of Lantau. The experts suggested studying this option further to find ways to cut construction costs and to move the bridge further north to minimise the impact on navigation and anchorage areas.

The other two alignments would create environment problems, the experts found. The southern option would run along the natural shoreline of West Lantau; the extreme southern alignment would require a tunnel to be dug on the slope above the natural coastline of South Lantau.

The feasibility study report will be submitted to the bridge's co- ordination group before it is sent to the central government.

Secretary for the Environment, Transport and Works Sarah Liao Sau-tung has said that the bridge could be completed by 2010 and that construction would ideally start at the end of this year or early next year. She said the project would be put out to international tender after approval by the central government.

To accommodate traffic from the bridge, the administration has earmarked funds for the North Lantau Highway Connection, estimated to cost $9.7 billion. Construction is to start in mid-2007.
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Old May 27th, 2005, 06:46 AM   #46
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Hopewell defends bridge
Dennis Chong and Sylvia Hui
Hong Kong Standard
May 13, 2005

Dismissing concerns that the proposed Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge will increase air pollution in the Pearl Delta area, a Hopewell executive and a key project manager of the bridge both downplayed the environmental impact of the proposed mega infrastructure Thursday.

But the claims met with strong opposition from some delegates at a conference on air pollution in the Pearl River Delta, organized by the Business Environment Council.

"Infrastructure doesn't by itself create pollution. Why blame highway builders? Why don't you blame car manufacturers?'' said Hopewell Highway Infrastructure's (HHI) executive director, Leo Leung.

HHI, a spin-off of Hopewell Holdings, is the leading advocate and frontrunner for developing the 30-kilometer project.

The Highways Department's Lam Chiu-hung, the project manager of the five-kilometer Hong Kong section of the bridge, said the project would create "insignificant pollution.''

He said the alignment of the bridge would "minimize'' the impact on air quality

and that the project would not cause severe pollution to the area because road traffic is a "small player in air pollution.''

But his comments were attacked by Hong Kong University professor of community medicine, Anthony Hedley. "Your proposals will create a major conduit ... for polluting sources to go straight to the heart of the SAR,'' he warned.

"If pollution is bad now, the bridge will make it intolerable.''

According to the Environmental Protection Department, emissions from motor vehicles make up 31 percent of total nitrogen oxides emissions and 14 percent of respirable suspended particulates.

The remarks followed recent reports that the ongoing environmental impact assessment on the multibillion-dollar project has alarming implications for Tung Chung New Town on Lantau.

The reports also alleged that the government is planning to seek a discretion for the Chief Executive to give the green light for the project, which will also involve the Macau and Zhuhai governments.

The Hong Kong government has branded the claims as "wild speculation,'' adding that it will not bypass the law.

When asked whether the assessment includes a protection study on the impact of future traffic patterns - which, according to estimates, could reach 80,000 vehicles a day - Lam said future problems will be solved by "other measures.''

But he did not elaborate on what those might be.

He later said the government can only conduct the study "based on available information.''

The government has not decided on the final route and landing points of the bridge, but an environmental assessment study was started in 2003 to look at the possible impact during the construction and operational stages.

According to the assessment study's brief, the impact on air should be calculated based on the maximum emission level over the next 15 years.

A paper issued by the Highways Department in October 2003, which specifies the scope of the assessment, named Tung Chung as one of the "potential receivers'' of air pollution from the bridge.

But it also concluded that "local air quality impacts due to vehicular emissions during the operation stage are not significant.''

Environmental Protection Department director Keith Kwok told the conference that, according to preliminary study data, there are no signs that the bridge will bring unacceptable pollution.

He stressed that the government will not bypass the law to give the green light to the long-awaited bridge, adding that final results of the study will be released soon.

The Highway Department's Lam said that, for the first few years of operation, traffic on the bridge is not expected to be substantial and will only have an "insignificant impact'' on the environment. But he added the alignment of the bridge will be adjusted to project people living nearby, including Tung Chung residents.

There are mounting concerns that Tung Chung, a new town of 100,000 people east of the landing point of the bridge at San Shek Wan, will be badly hit by air pollution when the bridge brings in more traffic and economic development. Lam said a decision on the route of the bridge will take several months.

The tendering process has not begun and no timetable has been set.
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Old May 28th, 2005, 07:06 AM   #47
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Toll fears for proposed bridge
Michael Ng, Hong Kong Standard
May 28, 2005



Following the precedent set by the sharp toll increase imposed by the management of the Eastern Harbour Crossing, legislators fear the government may lose its power to control toll levels for the proposed Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge in a public-private partnership.

Reporting on the progress of the bridge proposal to the Legislative Council Friday, Secretary for the Environment, Transport and Works Sarah Liao said experts from the mainland, Hong Kong and Macau had recommended at their April meeting to focus on the northern bridge and tunnel alignment, with landings at San Shek Wan on Lantau, Gongbei in Zhuhai and A Perola in Macau.

"The north alignment will cause the least disturbance to the environment and the habitat of dolphins in Pearl River Delta. The elevated bridge [passing] Sha Lo Wan in the north alignment option will also lower the damage caused to the coastline there," Liao said.

She said the government will find private investors to fund the construction of the bridge.

Seeking Legco approval for a HK$26.8 million fund for the design and technical studies of the bridge before next month, she hoped construction may start early next year.

But legislators are worried the government will lose its power to control toll charges under the Build, Operate, Transfer arrangement commonly used in all public-private partnership tunnels in Hong Kong.

Liberal Party transport sector legislator Miriam Yeung feared that the government's private sector partner will just refer to the rate of return when citing the bridge toll, making it unreasonable and unattractive for freight users.

"As there are alternative road transport options and river trade vessels available to the western coast of the Pearl River Delta, if the bridge venture refers purely to market levels to regain their investments and guarantee their return then the toll could reach several hundred Hong Kong dollars a trip," she said.

"This will not be an attractive rate for freight users. The toll will fail to make land transport between the coasts of Pearl River Delta convenient."

Democratic Party lawmaker Andrew Cheng suggested the government issue bonds, as it did when the government securitized five tunnels and the Tsing Ma bridge last year, to finance the project and prevent the bridge tolls spiraling out of government's control.

Liao said although the government has not yet decided the mode of commercial financing, she pledged the government will not lose the power to set tolls and will ensure it is competitive.

"I can assure you that the toll mechanism for the bridge will not be purely pegged to the rate of return. We are still seeking a balanced proposal," she said.

"We will also ensure that the bridge will not to be under-used, and that the traffic flow of the bridge will reach a specific target."

Director of Highways Mak Chai-kwong said his department is also studying four alignment options linking the bridge's landing point at San Shek Wan to the North Lantau Highway.

The options included a HK$8 billion elevated bridge, a HK$10 billion undersea tunnel, a HK$4 billion road passing through the Tung Chung new town, and a HK$6 billion tunnel.

Yeung agreed with the Highways Department's assessment that the HK$6 billion tunnel option will be the most appropriate option.

"The tunnel option should be used as its construction cost is the second lowest and will result in less environmental impact to Tung Chung. The HK$4 billion new road will only aggravate the air pollution problem there," she said.

The department will consult the Islands District Council of the four options, before seeking HK$9.715 billion from the legislature for its design and construction by early 2006.
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Old May 28th, 2005, 08:34 AM   #48
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Loving the quick thought processes put to work on this mega project!
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Old June 7th, 2005, 09:06 AM   #49
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I would say its impossible to build a large span bridge, just think of the tall towers, they would block the flight patterns around the HK airport...
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Old June 9th, 2005, 05:12 PM   #50
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Taxpayers face extra $26.8m bill for bridge study
Chester Yung, Hong Kong Standard
June 8, 2005

An additional HK$26.8 million of taxpayers' money will be needed for a technical study for the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge, according to a government paper which will be discussed in the Legislative Council today.

The amount comes on top of the HK$59 million granted to the government in 2003 for preliminary work on the HK$15 billion project. A green group Tuesday questioned the request for more funds as the government has so far released no information on how the money has been spent.

The Conservancy Association demanded to know how the original HK$59 million was spent.

"The accountability and transparency is of public concern as this is a massive project involving a lot of public money,'' said association chairman Albert Lai.

The association recently wrote to Legco saying the government advised lawmakers of a meeting of a bridge coordination group, which comprised representatives from the mainland, Macau and Hong Kong on August 29, 2003.

They agreed to commission a study on various subjects, including economic benefits, alignments, environmental impact and hydrology. Subsequently, Legco approved the HK$59 million.

"However, it is not clear whether the government had omitted an investigation on the economic benefits from the scope of the study,'' the paper said.

The director of highways recently recommended that the project be upgraded, and requested an additional HK$26.8 million.

"The government provided no justification whatsoever as to whether the promised study on economic viability had been carried out, or whether the outcome of the study justified the needs and viability of the project,'' the association's paper to legislators said.

If the feasibility and sustainability of the project turn out to be questionable, Legco's approval of HK$26.8 million will be a waste, said Lai.
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Old July 18th, 2005, 03:59 PM   #51
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China Bridge to Help Property Firms --- Long-Discussed Structure Would Link the Mainland To Hong Kong and Macau
By Mei Fong
18 July 2005
The Wall Street Journal Europe

HONG KONG -- A long-discussed, ambitious plan for a bridge linking mainland China with Hong Kong and Macau is likely to get off the ground soon, and that could generate significant gains for infrastructure and property plays.

Talk of a bridge to serve as a visible symbol of Hong Kong's and Macau's reunification with China began more than a decade ago. The project would link the two cities with China's Pearl River Delta region, an economic powerhouse that has less than 5% of China's population but accounts for about 20% of its gross domestic product and 40% of its exports. But the plan didn't get far beyond the drawing board, as the region was hit by the Asian financial crisis in the late 1990s, then by the SARS epidemic in 2003.

Now, such a bridge could serve as more than just a symbol. With Disneyland opening in Hong Kong in September and Macau's gambling revenue swelling, it could boost tourism and logistical links in one of the world's busiest manufacturing districts at a time when the area faces growing competition from the Yangtze industrial region around Shanghai.

Chinese authorities gave the green light to the bridge in March, though many details, such as the extent of private involvement and the timetable, haven't been set. But belief the bridge will be built is spurring partnership discussions among operators of everything from hotels to highways, industry executives say.

Some analysts expect an announcement on the funding structure by year's end. They predict the cost of the 29-kilometer bridge could range between HK$15 billion and HK$30 billion, or 1.6 billion euros and 3.2 billion euros, with the private sector owning between 10% and 50% and provincial governments in southern China owning the rest.

Victor Fung, chairman of the Greater Pearl River Delta Business Council, a government advisory group that includes key Hong Kong business figures, says the groundbreaking could happen before year's end. Earlier, "a lot of people didn't agree" with the idea of a bridge, said Mr. Fung, chairman of Hong Kong-based sourcing giant Li & Fung. "Now it's: `How come you guys aren't fast enough?' "

Even former critics now seem eager to play a role, including Macau casino magnate Stanley Ho. His family runs Hong Kong-listed Shun Tak Holdings, which controls ferries plying the Macau-Hong Kong route. Analysts speculate that Shun Tak might team up with other Hong Kong-listed companies, such as infrastructure and property company Hopewell Holdings, or Mr. Ho's leisure operator Melco International Development, to vie for the project.

"I think they realize the bigger the Macau story, the bigger the benefit to them," says Danie Schutte, an analyst at CLSA Asia-Pacific Markets.

Others that might pitch to participate are Cheung Kong Infrastructure, part of Li Ka-shing's Hutchison Whampoa conglomerate; toll operator Shenzhen Expressway; real-estate giant Sun Hung Kai Properties and real-estate and infrastructure firm Citic Pacific.

Analysts say Hopewell Holdings could emerge as one of the biggest players. The company's chief, Gordon Wu, a Princeton engineering graduate, proposed the bridge in the late 1980s and has been its most vocal advocate. In addition, its network of highways and property investments gives it one of the biggest footprints in the Pearl River area, analysts say.

The company has a strong cash flow, thanks to its 75% stake in Hopewell Highway Infrastructure, which builds and operates toll roads in China. As of December, Hopewell had HK$2.41 billion in cash, a sizable war chest for the project, says Andes Cheng, an analyst at South China Research, a Hong Kong brokerage firm.

In February, Merrill Lynch began covering both Hopewell Highway and Hopewell Holdings -- two years after Hopewell Highway and 33 years after Hopewell Holdings were listed in Hong Kong. Merrill Lynch analyst Cusson Leung says shares of the two companies generated little excitement before because of their relatively small market capitalizations and low trading volumes.

Now, Hopewell Holdings' market capitalization is US$2 billion (1.66 billion euros), up from between about US$500 million and US$600 million in the 2001-2002 period, while its share price has climbed sharply from about HK$4 at the end of 2001. On Friday, its shares rose 1% to close at HK$19.90 apiece.

"It's the company that stands to benefit most from [Pearl River Delta] regionalization," says Mr. Leung, who estimates that the asset value of Hopewell Holdings' infrastructure arm, Hopewell Highway, could increase between 50 Hong Kong cents and HK$1 per share if Hopewell wins a 50% stake in the bridge and it is completed swiftly.

Some analysts say shares of Hopewell Holdings remain relatively undervalued. Mr. Leung contends they are about 34% below asset value. Analysts attribute the undervaluation to uncertainties related to a potential stake in the bridge and the company's failure thus far to secure government approval for a proposed 60-story twin-tower hotel in Hong Kong.

If Hopewell Holdings gets a stake in the planned bridge, it might need to raise substantial debt, depending on the stake size, says CLSA's Mr. Schutte. Massive debt has become a big issue for some investors in major infrastructure projects; the Anglo-French company Eurotunnel is still struggling to pay debts from building the link between Britain and France.

Investors in infrastructure companies can face heavy risks, Mr. Schutte says, noting "timing is crucial in deciding when to buy infrastructure plays."
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Old July 18th, 2005, 09:22 PM   #52
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Cool Bridge!
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Old July 19th, 2005, 12:03 AM   #53
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Is there anything on how the bridge is going to look??? and what is the final alignment of the bridge???
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Old July 19th, 2005, 09:25 AM   #54
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I say make a dual rail/road bridge//extend the TCL line from Tung Chung or AEL to Macau and Zhu Hai
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Old September 2nd, 2005, 03:53 AM   #55
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Old September 2nd, 2005, 09:55 PM   #56
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Cost disputes halt Macau Bridge project
Plagued by disputes over financial planning, the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge project has came to a standstill, raising doubts about its tentative completion date in 2009
Carrie Chan
Hong Kong Standard
Saturday, September 03, 2005

Plagued by disputes over financial planning, the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge project has came to a standstill, raising doubts about its tentative completion date in 2009.

Shiu Sin-por, the executive director of the One Country Two Systems Research Institute, told The Standard that three senior officials overseeing the bridge under the State Ministry had recently approached him, seeking a solution to end the deadlock.

Shiu said the deadlock was the result of disagreements over different proposals concerning supporting facilities for the bridge.

According to him, construction costs had already risen sharply from the original estimate of HK$30 billion to around HK$50 billion, one fifth of which would be required for a man- made island to house cross-border immigration and customs checkpoints.

Part of the huge increase in construction expenditure is due to the extra supporting expressways proposed by the Zhuhai and Hong Kong governments.

"However, the disputes over financing and the cost of the proposed expressways has brought work to a halt," Shui said.

"The Zhuhai government has suggested an extra expressway in Zhuhai leading to the Bridge, while the Hong Kong government wants a road from Hong Kong International Airport to the island checkpoint.

" I have suggested that one viable solution is to turn the island into a commercial area by copying the example at Chek Lap Kok airport. The inspection hall area can function as a shopping mall for tourists and this will generate revenue to help pay for the bridge."

The proposed Zhuhai Expressway will cost an estimated HK$300 million. It is expected to ease traffic congestion in Zhuhai once the bridge is completed.

Chief Executive Donald Tsang was silent over the progress of the bridge when urged by construction sector lawmaker Ho Chung-tai to expedite the project.
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Old September 4th, 2005, 09:08 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qwertyuiop
I think I've seen renderings for the bridge, but I don't remember where...

And I think in the renderings, the bridge is going to be made up of mostly dull causeway spans. Kinda disappointing, I say if you're going to build a bridge that long, design something resembling the Gibraltar Strait Bridge or bury the bloody thing in a tunnel!


its the same bright they want build in Gibraltar
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Old September 7th, 2005, 04:48 AM   #58
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The Pearl River Delta is slammed by Typhoons every year, is it not? Look what happened to most of the causeway bridges in the Louisiana and Mississippi area after Hurricane Katrina, they were severely damaged. Most of this proposed bridge is causeway, does anyone else think this is inviting disaster?
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Old September 14th, 2005, 02:02 AM   #59
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If they build the bridges with Typhoons in mind, as they are going to do due to the frequency of them in the area, then the bridges should be more than capable of standing up to the most powerful typhoons. Problem with Louisiana was that because powerful hurricanes only hit from time to time people are generally more complacent and assume it wont happen, so don't want to go to the huge expense of being ready for it 'just in-case'.

I really hope this gets built, it could help spread out the incredible prosperity of HK into even more of the surronding area boasting China's economy even more.
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Old September 25th, 2005, 02:54 AM   #60
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Three-city bridge link reaches final stage
Neil Gough in Guangzhou
9/24/2005
South China Morning Post

Hong Kong Highways Department director Mak Chai-kwong said inter-government studies of the mammoth 49km bridge that would link Hong Kong, Macau and Zhuhai had reached the final stages.

The three regional governments are examining the final feasibility studies for the multibillion-dollar project after having finally reached a consensus on alignment of the route and landing points of the bridge.

At a panel discussion on infrastructure in the Pearl River Delta, Mr Mak said that after each government completed its review, the final feasibility study would be sent to the central government for approval.

While declining to set a timetable for when plans would be sent to Beijing, Mr Mak said: "Progress on this is by no means slow. In fact, I would say progress has been excellent."

He said that during the past 14 months, the Hong Kong government had commissioned some 30 topical studies on issues including the impact on the environment and Chinese white dolphins. Mr Mak is part of the co-ordinating group of government representatives that has set plans for the bridge's route. In May, it began considering 10 alignment options, and narrowed them down to the one contained in the final study.

In the plans, the bridge would head due west from Lantau Island and veer southwest after passing the Qingzhou Channel, roughly the halfway point.

Questioning the possibility of including a railway line along the bridge, MTR Corp chief design manager Malcolm Gibson said it was imperative to decide the intended market.

Passenger traffic would most likely gravitate towards buses or private vehicles, Mr Gibson said. Targeting the freight market posed challenges for a rail system because of logistical issues in transshipment. For freight rail to work, it will need to be integrated with a port and transverse a substantially dense cluster of factories, neither of which is the case with these plans.
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