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Old March 5th, 2016, 06:40 AM   #61
isaidso
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexandru.mircea View Post
^what are kids missing out, exactly?
- a yard of their own to do as they please with
- houses offer far more space and privacy
- the opportunity to have a car is reduced

Suburbia is boring for many urbanites but many do move out there for their kids... and rightly so. Even things like shooting hoops in the driveway, shoveling snow with my Dad, and mowing the lawn are cherished memories from my child hood. I'd never raise kids in a high rise. It's a house or I won't have kids at all.

When the kids finish university, I'd move back to a high rise downtown.
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Old March 5th, 2016, 06:36 PM   #62
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^ it's really strange that you forget everything that's in between a house with a garden and a highrise.

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^but all that is not specific to the highrise, it applies to the vast majority of types of urban collective housing. When I grew up in a P+4 lowrise (ground floor + four more floors) I wasn't having a garden, a nearby forest (or other sorts of nature), protection from crime etc. either. There's a huge lot of stuff between the highrise and the detached house with a garden.
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Old March 10th, 2016, 09:16 PM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexandru.mircea View Post
^ it's really strange that you forget everything that's in between a house with a garden and a highrise.
A low rise is even worse...just as bad, but without a view.

The only dense housing which is ok for families are terrace / row houses. They still allow for a high population density but you can also have a garden.
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Old March 10th, 2016, 09:35 PM   #64
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^ that's not a high density, where there are single family row houses. It's not low density either, just somewhere in between.

The quality of the view is not inherent to the height of the building. You may live up in a highrise and be surrended by other highrises of the same height, ergo you get to see your neighbours and the sky when looking upwards - just as if the block was a lowrise. You can live at the second floor and have a nice view over a beautifully composed segment of urban tissue. The key to all this is the how the buildings in front of your windows are disposed.

In terms of views, my experience is that the worst isn't living in lowrises, but living at the ground level of a highrise, surrounded by other highrises. You get very little sunlight, you don't have a good sense of privacy and it felt a bit claustrophobic too. In lowrises this is much better.
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Last edited by alexandru.mircea; March 10th, 2016 at 09:57 PM.
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Old March 20th, 2016, 02:29 AM   #65
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I live in a medium-rise (but wide) building (12 floors, 480 units total). There are some tricky things like the occasional noisy neighbor, or (in my case), elevators that are a tad too slow. The low maintenance fits my current workaholic schedule of a single young adult. Not sure about raising young kids in a setting like this, though.

The worst situation, for me, would be low-rise with few units, like those 3-floor, 6 units walk-up buildings. They don't provide you with the perks of a single home, while also not providing you with the professional standards/management that come with larger buildings like mine. It also almost forces you to develop a working relationship (regarding housing) with your building neighbors, which might be good if you are a super-social person, but a bad experience if one or more of the neighbors is bad, or if you are just the new tenant and has to put up with "the way things work here"...

----------------------

The idea that high density areas = more dangerous (crime-wise) is not something universal. There are many cities in Europe where crime rates per population are not significantly higher on inner urban neighborhoods.
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Old March 21st, 2016, 09:16 AM   #66
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High-rise apartments and condos are a rising trend in Metro Manila and the cityscape is experiencing Manhattanization!

But the metro's population increases and is now 4th the world, the solution is to build up!
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Old March 22nd, 2016, 08:05 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
I live in a medium-rise (but wide) building (12 floors, 480 units total). There are some tricky things like the occasional noisy neighbor, or (in my case), elevators that are a tad too slow. The low maintenance fits my current workaholic schedule of a single young adult. Not sure about raising young kids in a setting like this, though.
I don't think I'd want to raise kids in an high rise apartment, if I had the money I'd happily live in a family sized city centre townhouse in a larger city like this.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/new-homes...-40682661.html

But unfortunately that's about twice as expensive as our current house and at that lower price range city centre options for families are not great, they are either very small or in not so nice areas.
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Old March 22nd, 2016, 11:31 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonesy55 View Post
I don't think I'd want to raise kids in an high rise apartment, if I had the money I'd happily live in a family sized city centre townhouse in a larger city like this.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/new-homes...-40682661.html

But unfortunately that's about twice as expensive as our current house and at that lower price range city centre options for families are not great, they are either very small or in not so nice areas.
Look very nice, these houses! I guess I personally don't mind rising kids in a highrise, as long as it isn't some sort of ghetto and as long as the appartements are large enough.
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Old March 24th, 2016, 02:28 PM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonesy55 View Post
I don't think I'd want to raise kids in an high rise apartment, if I had the money I'd happily live in a family sized city centre townhouse in a larger city like this.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/new-homes...-40682661.html

But unfortunately that's about twice as expensive as our current house and at that lower price range city centre options for families are not great, they are either very small or in not so nice areas.
The problem is, you can live in the suburbs and for that same price get a 4-5 bed detached house with large gardens. Oh and more rooms for the children. So many new apartments / townhouses just have 1 living space - I know that didn't but that's rare.
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Old March 24th, 2016, 04:19 PM   #70
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Yes, but on the other hand out in the suburbs you don't have all the facilities of the city, your job and school etc just a few minutes walk away, so it depends what you place most priority on.

That place is 130m2 which would be plenty big enough for me, space is important up to a point, i wouldn't cram the family into a 40m2 apartment just so i could live in the most central or desirable district, but as long as i can get something like 120m2 then any extra budget i have I'd rather spend on improving location rather than a bigger and bigger property still out in the suburbs.
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Old March 24th, 2016, 09:48 PM   #71
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Big yards are overrated. Fewer and fewer kids are playing on yards and they tend to be unused over 95% of the time.
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Old March 25th, 2016, 01:28 AM   #72
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^ that's an interesting thought, but do you have a source for that or is it hyperbole? Right now I'd really like to have a garden for my kid (less than 2yo) and if I had it I'd make sure we use it intensively. Of course, if we would be talking about a more or less screen-addicted 8 year old then moving to a house with a garden would be an already lost battle indeed, but toddlers are... more malleable, so to say.
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Old March 25th, 2016, 04:35 AM   #73
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I'm talking from personal experience.
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Old March 25th, 2016, 09:39 AM   #74
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They probably are unused 95% of the time in the climate here once you take off nighttime hours, winter, rainy days, vacations, hours when the household are at work/school etc even if quite well used at other times.

But then my shower/bath, washing machine, oven, toilet etc are also unused 95% of the time, even my bed is unused 70% of the time but I'm not going to get rid of it!
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Old March 25th, 2016, 02:40 PM   #75
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Quote:
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Yes, but on the other hand out in the suburbs you don't have all the facilities of the city, your job and school etc just a few minutes walk away, so it depends what you place most priority on.
You get schools in suburbs and at least in the South Manchester - North Cheshire exurbs there are plenty of employment places with AstraZeneca and the airport.
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Old March 25th, 2016, 02:54 PM   #76
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Yes, of course there are, but not nearly as many shops, places of employment, bars, restaurants, entertainment venues etc within a 5-10 minute walk as there are in or adjacent to a city centre.

I would think 95% of people working at Alderley Park drive there rather than walk.
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Old March 25th, 2016, 03:05 PM   #77
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I also there are some cultural differences in regard to whether kids go on their own to neighborhood streets or not. Here in the Netherlands, it is fairly common to see kids that look like 8 and upwards to be on their own in neighborhood small play areas, often unsupervised by adults. That is definitively not the case in US and Canada (I'm not sure about Australia), where kids that young roaming alone outside their home lots would probably attract a 9-1-1 call by a concerned citizen.

Some high-rise buildings also have a private communal area (garden/playground) for kids to play.

I think some people immediately associate high-rises with either roughen-up areas that area dangerous, or else child-less areas without many other kids around. That might be true in some cities, not in all of them though.
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Old March 25th, 2016, 03:47 PM   #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonesy55 View Post
They probably are unused 95% of the time in the climate here once you take off nighttime hours, winter, rainy days, vacations, hours when the household are at work/school etc even if quite well used at other times.

But then my shower/bath, washing machine, oven, toilet etc are also unused 95% of the time, even my bed is unused 70% of the time but I'm not going to get rid of it!
I was referring to large backyards of American houses in suburbia.
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Old March 25th, 2016, 04:34 PM   #79
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I'm talking from personal experience.
From my personal experience this is true as well. I spend my first 7 years of life in an appartement which had a garden we shared with the other two appartement owners who lived above us. The garden in total was about 40 square meters, plus some 30 square meters of gravel path inbetween the house and the garden. These 70 square meters were enough for us six children from three families.

Afterwards we moved to a single family home with a larger garden, but to me and my brother the close by park was much more important, as we couldn't really play in the garden anymore (for example football: either the ball flew to our neighbors or in the precious flowers of our mother ) So from my perspective, gardens are indeed overrated for children.
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Old March 28th, 2016, 02:43 PM   #80
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The only thing I like gardens for is having a BBQ. I do miss that here in an apartment.

To be honest, I still think my ideal is the kind of house without a garden near a train station with a minimal commute of <30 mins.
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