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Old April 21st, 2006, 09:36 AM   #21
newyorkrunaway1
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i agree, ny doesn't have to re-invent itself. it will remain an icon and stand above all else forever.
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Old April 21st, 2006, 06:55 PM   #22
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and this is ony those currently under construction....crazy!!!
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Old April 21st, 2006, 08:13 PM   #23
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In a few days, Freedom Tower might be on the list!
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Old April 22nd, 2006, 01:11 AM   #24
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Nice job krull its about time someone made an NYC thread.

How bout that development with the big coke-a-cola sign or is that in New Jersey?
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Old April 22nd, 2006, 01:55 AM   #25
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^you mean the Pepsi sign? That's in Queens, the Long Island city redevelopment, but it's proposed, and the list is for U/C buildings only
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Old April 22nd, 2006, 02:21 AM   #26
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Thanks everyone!

I will post the proposing renderings soon...
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Old April 22nd, 2006, 08:26 AM   #27
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Cool! I can't wait!
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 12:12 AM   #28
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Thanks everyone!

I added a few more renderings and a few more projects under construction.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 01:27 AM   #29
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Condos, New Retail To Be Added to Times Square Mix


By MICHAEL STOLER
April 20, 2006

Change is afoot at Times Square, the city's iconic neighborhood that now covers an area from Sixth Avenue to Ninth Avenue and 39th Street to 52nd Street.

Before the end of the month, Boston Properties, which owns 5 Times Square, is expected to announce the winning bidder for the 37-story, 1.1 million square-foot office tower that is leased to Ernest & Young. The winning bidder is expected to be Dubai-based Istithmar, which last week agreed to pay about $600 million for the 40-story, 905,000-square-foot office tower at 450 Lexington Ave., which is subject to a 99-year land lease, industry sources say. The seller is a joint venture of Murray Hill Properties, Westbrook Partners, and the Canadian pension plan SITQ.

In May 2002, what was then the accounting firm of Arthur Andersen opted out of its agreement to occupy space in Times Square Tower, the 48-story, 1.2 million-square-foot building at 7 Times Square and Broadway. A director at Cushman & Wakefield, Joanne Podell, said, "After more than three years of discussion, Ann Taylor Loft has signed a lease in the Times Square Tower. We expect the store to be profitable due to its location, hours of operation, and viability of retail in Times Square."

Directly across the street is 1466 Broadway, also known as 6 Times Square. The 15-story, 298,000-squarefoot office building, built in 1907, houses a three-level Gap store. In November 2004, SL Green Realty sold the building, built for John Jacob Astor IV, to Sitt Asset Management and Steven Sutton for $160 million. The property, at the corner of 42nd Street and Broadway, was formerly the fashionable Knickerbocker Hotel that counted as its customers celebrities such as George Cohan and Enrico Caruso. The building was renovated into showrooms and offices in 1982. At the time of the purchase, the new owners indicated they had an interest in converting the top floors into a hotel or luxury condos. Trade sources indicate that an investor from the Middle East might be the winning bidder at a price of close to $1,000 a square foot.

***

One of Manhattan's most active investors, the Moinian Group, was part of a joint venture including the Chetrit Group and Edward Minskoff, that in May 2004 paid about $121 million, or $316 a square foot, for the 42-story, 382,000-square-foot office tower at 1450 Broadway and 41st Street. In November 2005, the owners announced plans to convert the top floors of the buildings into residential condominiums. Last month, the Moinian Group and its partner, MacFarlane Partners, opened the sales office for the Atelier, a 46-story, 478-unit condo tower at 635 W. 42nd St. This building is part of the first phase of a 1.5 million-square-foot mixed-use complex. The entire project will occupy most of the city block on the north side of 42nd Street between 11th Avenue and the Hudson River. The second phase will include about 300 residential condominiums and 350 rental apartments at 605 W. 42nd St. and 11th Avenue.

The co-president of the Durst Organization, Douglas Durst, said, "I never expected the Times Square and 42nd Street corridor to evolve as a center of office, retail, and residential." Across the street from 1466 Broadway is 4 Times Square Tower, the 48-story, 1.6 million-square-foot building completed in 1999 by the Durst Organization. The office tower is leased to Conde Nast and the law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom. Adjacent to the building is One Bryant Park, also known as the Bank of America Tower. The building is being co-developed by the Durst Organization and Bank of America.

Last month, Bank of America committed to occupying an additional 522,000 square feet of space. The deal expands the bank's occupancy to more than 77% of the space from 53%. The bank will lease about 1.63 million square feet of space, leaving about 450,000 square feet available. Mr. Durst said, "I don't think we'll have any trouble getting $100 per square feet at the top of the building. Right now we have at least 10 companies who are interested the space."

***

Last October, Equity Office Properties Trust closed on a $505 million purchase of the 41-story Verizon Building at 1095 Sixth Ave., which is across from the Bank of America Tower. Verizon kept about 200,000 square feet of the building as a condominium. Equity plans to spend about $250 million to renovate the tower. Office space is being marketed for rents of more than $1,000 a square foot.

According to industry sources, the 25-story, 227,000-square-foot Candler Building at 220 W. 42nd St. - at the heart of Times Square and home to a three-level McDonald's - is in contract to be sold. The building was built in 1912-14 as a commission from Asa Candler, a founder of the Coca-Cola Company. West of the Candler Building is the 444-room Hilton Times Square. Last month, Sunstone Hotel Investors paid $242.5 million for that property. The seller was a partnership of Forest City Ratner and Hilton Hotels, who completed the hotel in June 2000.

Contracts for about 97% of the residential condominiums have been sold at the Orion, a development of Extell Investment Management and the Carlyle Group. The 58-story, 551-unit midblock building is at 350 W. 42nd St., west of the former McGraw-Hill Building. Extell Investment Management is assembling a site at 131-139 W. 45th St., directly behind the Muse Hotel on West 46th Street, The New York Sun has been told. It plans to develop a luxury hotel on the site.

Last month, Vornado Realty Trust wrote off $6.87 million it had spent on development costs for a project at the Port Authority Bus Terminal. Vornado had planned to use the air rights of the Port Authority to develop a 39-story tower atop the building on Eighth Avenue from 40th to 42nd streets.

As the Sun reported earlier this month, the Paramount Group has retained Douglas Harmon of Eastdil Secured to sell the 44-story, 1.1 million-square-foot building at 1540 Broadway, Bertelsmann's American headquarters. Based on recent purchases, the property, built in 1990, might fetch $1.1 million, or $1,000 a square foot.

A 46-story, 250-unit residential condo tower is planned for the northwest corner of Eighth Avenue and 46th Street, with addresses of 301-307 W. 46th St. and 733-763 Eighth Ave. The owner, New Jersey-based SJP Properties, originally had planned to construct an 80/20 residential rental at 750 Eighth Ave., on the northwest corner of 46th Street, which was once home to McHale's restaurant. Due to the strength of Times Square real estate, the company has decided to build a luxury residential condominium. SJP is also building a residential condominium at 45 Park Ave., on the site of the former Sheraton Russell.

On the corner of Eighth Avenue and 47th Street, a New York-based development company is planning to construct a 40-story luxury residential condominium. A third tower is planned for West 48th Street and Eighth Avenue.

A combination of factors, including creative tax subsidies and demand for more residential and office space in Times Square, has aided in the area's resurgence.


© 2006 The New York Sun, One SL, LLC.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 02:38 AM   #30
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http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/16/realestate/16cov.html
How Big Is Too Big?

By WILLIAM NEUMAN
Published: April 16, 2006


Marilynn K. Yee/The New York Times

Robert M. Scarano's building at 4 East Third Street in Manhattan has drawn fire from critics who say it is too big.



Robert Stolarik for The New York Times

FOCUS OF PROTESTS Stephanie A. Thayer has been protesting a building designed by Mr. Scarano Jr. that is going up at 144 North Eighth Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.



Robert Stolarik for The New York Times

Kevin Shea, a lawyer and expediter, is seeking changes in Mr. Scarano's 16-story building, now almost completed at 4 East Third Street, at the Bowery.



Robert Stolarik for The New York Times

One of Robert M. Scarano Jr.'s buildings in Williamsburg, Brooklyn: 78 Ten Eyck Street. His buildings make use of mezzanines, and whether these areas should count as part of the buildings' total square footage is at issue. The city's Buildings Department has accused Mr. Scarano of knowingly ignoring building codes or zoning rules in submitting plans for 26 apartment buildings in several Brooklyn neighborhoods.


IT is not hard to spot the buildings that Robert M. Scarano Jr., an architect, has designed in New York City: they tend to be a lot bigger than the other buildings around them.

In Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Mr. Scarano's building at 78 Ten Eyck Street is about twice as tall as the modest three-story houses on either side of it. In the East Village, the new building at 4 East Third Street, at the Bowery, rises to 16 stories, far above the other buildings on the block, including a row of 18th-century town houses.

Mr. Scarano has played an active role in the city's current construction boom, particularly in Brooklyn, where he has numerous projects in rapidly changing neighborhoods like Williamsburg and Brighton Beach. His designs have brought him plenty of business from developers rushing to take advantage of rising real estate values.

But the sheer bulk of many of Mr. Scarano's projects has prompted some residents to complain that he ignores the zoning code and puts up buildings that are simply too big, blocking the light and views of their neighbors. And too often, they say, the city has stood by and done nothing.

Stephanie A. Thayer lives in Williamsburg and has been active in protests over a tall building designed by Mr. Scarano that is going up at 144 North Eighth Street. She was also involved in years of community debate that led to a major rezoning in Williamsburg last year, including lower bulk and density restrictions for much of the neighborhood.

In contrast, she said, Mr. Scarano, with his outsize buildings, seems to have "single-handedly rezoned his own little development plots."

Now Mr. Scarano is beginning to draw greater scrutiny.

The city's Buildings Department has accused him of knowingly ignoring building codes or zoning rules in submitting plans for 25 apartment buildings in several Brooklyn neighborhoods. Mr. Scarano was scheduled to attend a hearing on the charges on Thursday, but the hearing has now been postponed. Ilyse Fink, a spokeswoman for the Buildings Department, said the agency is continuing to look at other projects submitted by Mr. Scarano.

According to the petition outlining the charges before the city's Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings, at least 17 of the buildings cited in the charges were designed with more floor area than was allowed under zoning rules.

At the core of the case prepared by the Buildings Department is the contention that Mr. Scarano abused the honor system that allows architects and engineers to police themselves by approving their own building plans. Known as the professional certification program, the honor system was instituted under the Giuliani administration and was meant to trim costs by cutting the workload for the city's plan examiners. It was also intended to eliminate obstacles to building in a city where, at the time, construction projects could be delayed for months while builders waited for plans to be approved.

By participating in the professional certification program, architects guarantee to the city that their plans meet zoning and building codes. But the city has experienced a tremendous boom in new construction in the last several years, and officials have begun to worry that the honor system leaves too much room for architects and developers to run roughshod over zoning rules and safety regulations.

In response, the Buildings Department has drafted a series of changes to its disciplinary procedures that would make it easier to pursue architects and engineers who it believes are code scofflaws — one proposal would give the department's commissioner the right to pre-emptively strip them of the right to certify their own plans. The proposed changes were presented to a group of industry members last Tuesday.

If the city succeeds in its case against Mr. Scarano, he will be required to have all his plans approved by city examiners. He would be the first architect in more than a year to be barred from signing off on his own plans under the professional certification program, according to data on disciplinary actions posted online by the Buildings Department.

Ms. Fink said one reason there were few recent cases was that several staff members left the department's investigative unit last year. She said that the unit has since hired more investigators.

The complaint about many of Mr. Scarano's buildings is not that they are too tall or break height restrictions. Instead, the city contends that they are too big in another sense: they exceed limits on square footage, making them too bulky.

The building at 78 Ten Eyck Street, which has 11 condos, is typical of many of the buildings designed by Mr. Scarano. In plans submitted to the city in 2003, he described it as a four-story building. But it is at least 55 feet tall, more typically the height of a five- or six-story building, and it dwarfs its two- and three-story neighbors.

That is because Mr. Scarano included three mezzanine floors, turning the apartments into virtual duplexes, with an upstairs and a downstairs and a double-height ceiling in the living room.

But when it came time to calculate the square footage of the building to show that it qualified under the zoning code's floor-area limits, Mr. Scarano said the mezzanine floors were exempt and subtracted their 2,442 square feet from the total.

The Buildings Department reviewed the plans for 78 Ten Eyck early last year and stopped work on the condo project, informing the developer, Lipe Gross, that the building, which was nearing completion, was too big.

In response, city records show, Mr. Gross paid $200,000 to a neighbor to transfer 2,000 square feet of air rights to his property in an attempt to make the building legal. He has also agreed to make some of the mezzanines smaller, further reducing the building's square footage.

Mr. Gross said that when the issue of the floor area arose last year, Mr. Scarano told him that in his understanding of Buildings Department rules, he was not required to count the mezzanines because the low ceiling height, just over seven feet, exempted them from floor area tabulations. "He was understanding that it was kosher," Mr. Gross said.

Mr. Scarano refused requests for an interview. A lawyer for Mr. Scarano, Raymond T. Mellon, said that neither he nor Mr. Scarano would answer questions related to the disciplinary case before the hearing. Mr. Mellon has filed papers with the city denying the charges and saying that the city's interpretation of the building and zoning rules was subjective.

Gloria Sinchi literally lives in the shadow of 78 Ten Eyck, in a rented apartment in an English basement on Leonard Street. She said her three children no longer play in the small concrete yard behind their apartment. That is partly because of the construction, she said, but more because the yard is now deep in the shadow of its towering neighbor.

The building at 78 Ten Eyck, which is called Tower 78 in marketing materials, occupies an L-shaped lot, and Ms. Sinchi's yard is hemmed in by the two legs of the L, with high walls on both sides. "It's all surrounded," she said.

Mr. Gross took his condos off the market last spring after the city audit. But other condo buildings designed by Mr. Scarano have been completed and are now occupied by new apartment owners.

Mr. Scarano designed the buildings at 63 and 69 Stagg Street in Williamsburg, around the corner from 78 Ten Eyck. Here too, Mr. Scarano described the Stagg Street buildings, in documents filed with the city as 55-foot-tall buildings, each with four stories and three mezzanines. In drawings submitted to the city, Mr. Scarano estimated that the maximum allowable floor area permitted for each of the two buildings was 6,600 square feet.

Nonetheless, the drawings indicate each building has a total of more than 10,000 square feet of space. To account for the difference, Mr. Scarano deducted from his zoning calculations for each building nearly 1,800 square feet of mezzanine space and more than 2,000 square feet of basement space that made up the lower level of a ground-floor duplex. Each building contains eight units.

The Buildings Department audited Mr. Scarano's plans last spring and let the work continue, then gave the buildings certificates of occupancy in July.

But now the city contends in its disciplinary complaint that Mr. Scarano's calculations were faulty and that the mezzanine and the basement space should have been counted as part of the overall floor area of the buildings.

Ms. Fink, the Buildings Department spokeswoman, said the city's investigation of Mr. Scarano applies only to the drawings and other documents he submitted. In some cases, she said, zoning violations may have been addressed to bring the buildings into compliance before they were completed. But she said she was not permitted to discuss details of the projects, including the status of finished buildings like the ones on Stagg Street.

While several of the buildings have been completed, some are under construction and work on others has not yet begun. Ms. Fink said the city would eventually have to consider what to do with completed buildings that may have too much floor area or may contain other violations.

The mezzanine has become something of a Scarano signature and has made Mr. Scarano's services very much in demand. Developers, as a rule, are eager to maximize the square footage of their buildings, and in many cases, Mr. Scarano's mezzanines have given them a way to do just that.

Mr. Scarano has been prolific in recent years, and an analysis of Buildings Department data online suggests that the buildings cited in the city's case may be part of a broader pattern. According to the online data, Mr. Scarano has submitted plans for at least 299 new buildings in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island since the early 1990's; 44 of those have been completed.

Among Mr. Scarano's filings are plans for about 150 buildings containing one or more mezzanines, virtually all of those coming in the last six years. Approximately two-thirds of the buildings with mezzanines are described in Mr. Scarano's filings as having four stories and being at least 54 feet tall, suggesting the designs have similarities to the Ten Eyck and Stagg Street projects already targeted in the city's investigation.

Mr. Scarano has incorporated mezzanines into plans for much larger buildings as well. One of his more ambitious projects is a 172-foot-tall condo tower with medical offices planned for 62 Brighton Second Place in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, in an area of mostly one- and two-story bungalows. Each of the proposed building's 10 apartments has a mezzanine with a terrace and bathroom.

But in zoning calculations submitted with his drawings, Mr. Scarano deducted more than a third of the building's total residential square footage, including all the mezzanine space. In this way, a 14,000-square-foot building manages to squeeze into a 9,024-square-foot zoning envelope. The building is not one of those cited in the city's disciplinary case against Mr. Scarano, and the project was issued a preliminary permit in January.

Whether mezzanines should be counted for zoning purposes will most likely be a major issue when an administrative law judge decides the case involving Mr. Scarano. Zoning rules include mezzanines in a list of building features that must be counted as floor area. But there is at least one exception. The Buildings Department's guidelines for architects and engineers say that mezzanines intended as storage space can be omitted from floor-area calculations if they have ceiling heights of five feet or less and are accessible only by a ladder.

Mr. Scarano routinely labels mezzanines as storage space in his drawings and related documents. But in case after case, they contain windows and bathrooms or laundry rooms, are reached by a staircase and are clearly intended as living space.

While neighborhood residents accuse Mr. Scarano of breaking the rules, other developers ask if the rules are being applied evenly. Kris Corey is completing construction of a pair of four-story rental buildings at 264 and 268 Devoe Street in Williamsburg. In recent months he has watched as another developer put up a building designed by Mr. Scarano at 270 Devoe next door. Mr. Scarano's building — described in filings with the city as four stories with two mezzanines — is taller than Mr. Corey's buildings and appears to have substantially more square footage.

Mr. Corey said he asked his own architect about the difference. "I said to him, 'Did we shortchange ourselves?' " Mr. Corey recounted. "And he said, 'You're built to the max by the letter of the law.' "

"It's not fair," Mr. Corey said. "If he's allowed to do it, why couldn't we?"

Mr. Scarano's building on Devoe Street has not been audited by the city and is not included in the Buildings Department case.

Kevin Shea, a lawyer and expediter who helps architects and building owners negotiate the labyrinth of zoning rules and Buildings Department procedures, has been waging a campaign against Mr. Scarano's 16-story building on East Third Street at the Bowery.

Along the way, he said, he has confronted what he contends is a willingness of the Buildings Department to ignore apparent zoning violations or to find creative ways to make zoning rules fit Mr. Scarano's building, rather than the other way around.

Mr. Shea submitted a brief to the city's Board of Standards and Appeals last November detailing numerous objections to the building, which he says has many zoning violations and substantially more square footage than should be allowed. This building is also separate from the city's disciplinary case with Mr. Scarano, and largely involves different zoning issues.

To what degree it may be overbuilt depends partly on what the building is used for. That is because the zoning rules allow different amounts of square footage for apartments, for which it was originally designed, than for hotel rooms, for which it is currently being reconfigured.

Mr. Shea contends that it is too big in any case. "I think four floors should come off the top," he said.

An interest in the building was sold last year to the group of developers that created the fashionable Maritime Hotel on West 16th Street at Ninth Avenue. They hired a new architect and a zoning lawyer, and have been in discussions with Mr. Shea and city officials.

"This doesn't seem to be an egregious violation of the zoning," said Richard Born, one of the new investors in the project. "There are issues, but they seem to be resolvable."

Mr. Shea was reluctant to be quoted as saying anything critical of the Buildings Department, since he works with it on a regular basis, but he said he felt compelled to speak up about Mr. Scarano and what he sees as a willingness of officials to bend the rules.

Mr. Shea said he first notified the Buildings Department in May 2004 that he believed there were problems with the design of the East Third Street building. The department conducted an audit that raised numerous concerns, but after a brief halt, city officials let work proceed, and the building is now largely completed.

In his brief submitted to the Board of Standards and Appeals, Mr. Shea accuses the Buildings Department of coining novel interpretations of its own rules in an effort to let Mr. Scarano's building stand. "If the answer to how big a building is or what you can do in the construction industry is 'whatever you can get away with,' then I'm out of business," Mr. Shea said.

He said the Buildings Department had "lost control" of the honor system that allows architects and engineers to sign off on their own work. "The program rests on a promise and a threat," he said. "The promise is that of the professional, that his plans conform to the code and the zoning resolution. And the threat is that, if the Buildings Department finds out otherwise, they're either going to discipline the architect or order remedial measures to bring the building into compliance.

"Four East Third Street is what happens when an empty promise is met by an empty threat."
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 07:11 AM   #31
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Dont move to NYC if you dont want to see "huge" 16 story buildings, move to Montana and be quite.
Whats at the top a bell tower?
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 02:36 PM   #32
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Great work! I haven't heard of almost half of these until now.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 02:40 PM   #33
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boy krull-- that is one ugly building^
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 09:41 PM   #34
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Is 80 South Street still in the drawing boards, ready to start construction? I'm really looking forward to this one.
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Old April 24th, 2006, 03:04 AM   #35
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http://www.downtownexpress.com/de_15...emolition.html

Volume 18 • Issue 49 | April 21 - 27, 2006

Parker begins demolition before approval to rebuild

By Ronda Kaysen

A stand of squat, one-story buildings in North Tribeca will soon be demolished, making way for a controversial residential development project.

The Jack Parker Corporation began cleaning the buildings bounded by West, Washington, Watts and Desbrosses Sts. of asbestos last week and plans to begin demolishing them soon.

Parker recently applied to rezone the block along with three other blocks to make way for high-rise residential developments. The Parker Corp. insists last week’s work is nothing more than what it is: a preliminary demolition, and does not mean that the company is preparing to begin building before it has city approval.

“The buildings have deteriorated to the point that they are not safe standing,” said William Wallerstein, vice president of the Parker Corp. “Rather than repair something that will ultimately be demolished, we decided to bring them down.”

The Parker Corp.’s plans for the area have not boded well with local residents who insist the zoning proposal would open the door for large, bulky buildings. Residents launched a campaign to block the application, which must be approved by City Council and the City Planning Commission. Community Board 1 rejected the application, although the board is only advisory.

The demolition has not ignited anger in the community, however. “We welcome the demolition, we have absolutely no problems with that,” said Andrew Neale, a Community Board 1 member and a member of the Tribeca Community Association, which has spearheaded the fight against Parker. “What is there now? It’s a hideous eyesore.”

Neale was concerned, however, that the demolition would wreak havoc on the Fleming Smith Warehouse, a landmark building located across the street from the property.

Wallerstein insists that his company—which successfully demolished five buildings surrounding a historic Broadway theater in Midtown—knows how to take down buildings safely.

“The demolition work isn’t being done with a wrecking ball, we’re not bringing in dynamite,” he said. “We are concerned about any nearby building, whether it’s next door or down the block.”

— Ronda Kaysen
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Old April 24th, 2006, 04:10 AM   #36
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I swear New York is the NIMBY capital of the world.
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Old April 24th, 2006, 04:50 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by centreoftheuniverse
I swear New York is the NIMBY capital of the world.

I just skimmed through the thread but noticed that there are no proposed supertalls in NYC. Plus there was that post with residents saying that a proposal was TOO BIG. Sadly all they have now is the Empire State building witch was completed way back in 1931 as a building with significant heigt. I hope that they build Trump's idea of the WTC replacement but does the FAR(Floor to Area Ratio) in the NYC lawbooks restrict big buildings like you see in Hong Kong, Chicago, Dubai, Shaghai, Guangzhou and other places with extremely tall buildings? NYC needs to move UP UP UP.
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Old April 24th, 2006, 05:48 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FROM LOS ANGELES
Is 80 South Street still in the drawing boards, ready to start construction? I'm really looking forward to this one.
Not till they sell some units, so far they havent sold any.

NYC doesnt build super tall anymore, didnt you get the memo, their scared.
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Old April 24th, 2006, 05:52 AM   #39
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It's the families of the victims that are scared, not New York.
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Old April 24th, 2006, 10:47 PM   #40
FROM LOS ANGELES
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Trust me, NY has to build tall, can't believe Miami and Vegas are building taller than NY.
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