daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy (aug.2, 2013) | DMCA policy | flipboard magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > East Midlands Forum

East Midlands Forum For Nottingham, Derby, Lincoln, Leicester, Corby, Northampton, and Milton Keynes.



Reply

 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 5 votes, 4.20 average.
Old January 21st, 2014, 02:21 PM   #381
Leicity82
Leicester - why not?
 
Leicity82's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: City of Leicester, UK
Posts: 9,141
Likes (Received): 23

The saga continues:

http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/Ne...ail/story.html
__________________
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Come on Leicester lurkers, join the forum!
Leicity82 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old January 28th, 2014, 08:14 PM   #382
Leicity82
Leicester - why not?
 
Leicity82's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: City of Leicester, UK
Posts: 9,141
Likes (Received): 23

Images/information about the inside of the new visitor centre:

http://visitleicester.info/things-to...and-discovery/
__________________
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Come on Leicester lurkers, join the forum!
Leicity82 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2014, 10:24 PM   #383
Leicity82
Leicester - why not?
 
Leicity82's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: City of Leicester, UK
Posts: 9,141
Likes (Received): 23

New website:
http://kingrichardinleicester.com
__________________
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Come on Leicester lurkers, join the forum!
Leicity82 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 11th, 2014, 09:37 AM   #384
Lears City
Look there, look there!
 
Lears City's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Leicester
Posts: 6,509
Likes (Received): 40

Looks amazing...

Quote:
Richard III's crown taking shape ready for a prominent place in reburial

By Leicester Mercury | Posted: February 10, 2014
By Tom Mack

A crown is taking shape ready for a prominent place in Richard III's reburial.

John Ashdown-Hill, a historian and member of the Richard III Society, who helped trace the king's relatives, offered to pay for a crown in the style of the one Richard would have worn.

He published pictures of progress on the crown his website.

He said: "The idea came to me in September 2012, while I was carrying the box containing his bones from the Greyfriars site to the vehicle which was to take them away for scientific examination.

"I offered to pay for the crown because, having carried him, I can't help feeling close to Richard III.

"The design chosen is an open crown, like the one Richard III wore around his helmet on the last day of his life.

"The frame of the crown has now been completed. It is made of base metal.

"In the coming weeks, it will be polished, plated with gold, and set with enamelled white roses, garnets, sapphires and pearls."

The reinterment could take place at Leicester Cathedral before August.

However, it depends on the battle for the bones, which will take place at the High Court, in London, on March 13.

The University of Leicester and Ministry of Justice will argue for the legality of the licence which gave the university control of Richard III's remains.

The Plantagenet Alliance will argue there was inadequate consultation about the decision to keep the king in Leicester.

If the king's remains are to be reburied in Leicester Cathedral, the crown would play a role in the service.

The Rev Pete Hobson, canon missioner at Leicester Cathedral, said: "We're really pleased John has been able to produce this wonderful crown.

"It remains our intention to give it pride of place within the reinterment ceremony as and when we're allowed to proceed."

A funeral pall to be draped over the coffin is also being made and commemorative stained-glass windows will tell the story of Richard III.

Textile artist Jacquie Binns will create the pall, while Thomas Denny is in the process of designing two windows for the one of the cathedral's chapels.

See more pictures at:

www.johnashdownhill.com
Lears City no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 11th, 2014, 06:54 PM   #385
d4mo85
Tent-based twattery.
 
d4mo85's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Leicester, UK
Posts: 2,329
Likes (Received): 8

Looks impressive, the finished product will be superb.
__________________
The historic City of Leicester
d4mo85 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 11th, 2014, 07:40 PM   #386
Blondeibomb
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Melton Mowbray
Posts: 28
Likes (Received): 5

Should be a full state funeral, as he was a head of state. ( in my view )
Blondeibomb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 12th, 2014, 08:32 AM   #387
Owlyross
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Leicester
Posts: 375
Likes (Received): 0

I took this pic the other week.


I hope he's finally getting that horse he was after...
Owlyross no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 18th, 2014, 10:23 AM   #388
Lears City
Look there, look there!
 
Lears City's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Leicester
Posts: 6,509
Likes (Received): 40

Short film to be made.

Quote:
Doctor Who star Colin Baker to play lead in Richard III film - Finding Richard

By Leicester Mercury | Posted: February 18, 2014
By Tim Healy

Doctor Who star Colin Baker is to play the lead in a film featuring the discovery of the remains of King Richard III.

Finding Richard follows a boy who, on hearing the bones have been found under a Leicester car park, begins his own quest.

Helping Gull on this journey is his grandad, himself a dreamer, who sees something of himself in the boy.

What Gull finds is not quite what he or his grandad expected.

Joining Colin – who played the sixth Doctor Who in the 1980s – is David Knight, 13, as Gull.

David has appeared in Doctors and Britain's Got Talent and attends drama school The Pauline Quirke Academy, in South Wigston.

The short film, to be shot on location in Leicestershire, has been co-written by director Rhys Davies and producer Doug Cubin.

It is due to be submitted to Cannes Film Festival in early March, so actors and production crew are up against a tight deadline.

Speaking from Los Angeles, Colin, 70, said: "I am excited about taking part in this project.

"I receive many scripts from successful or aspiring filmmakers and am rarely able to participate, unfortunately.

"However, I'll make no bones about it, when I read Finding Richard, I knew I had to try to find time to play grandad. It's an impressive, gentle and sensitive script, so I have managed to squeeze the time between trips to the USA and New Zealand and am looking forward to joining the team in Leicester."

Rhys said: "The film is an homage to dreamers everywhere – stay true to yourself, follow your own path and you will succeed.

"To work with a legend such as Colin Baker is an exciting prospect and together with rising star David Knight they will make the film a special prospect."

Doug said: "This film being destined for the Cannes Film Festival and having such a great cast means we will do everything possible to create a wonderful experience for the audience."

Finding Richard is a co-production between Hive Films and Sawscale Films for Cannes 2014.

Doug said Colin was due to shoot his scenes in Leicester in the coming week.

Colin played the sixth Doctor Who between 1984 and 1986.

He was recently in I'm a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here!.
Lears City no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 4th, 2014, 05:57 PM   #389
Refresh01
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 77
Likes (Received): 5

http://www.designweek.co.uk/news/kin...=dwnews_156203

Quote:
Studio MB has designed a £1.2m visitor center on the site of the discovered remains of King Richard III, which tells the story of the life, death and discovery of ‘the lost king.’

Richard III
An installation telling the story of how Richard III’s remains were discovered
Richard III was killed in the Battle of Bosworth Field of 1485 and is the last King to have died in battle. It brought an end to the Wars of The Roses and the Plantagenet dynasty.

His naked body was carried to Leicester by supporters of Henry VII and buried, unceremoniously, in Greyfriar’s Church.

More than 500 years later in 2013 his remains were found in a council-owned car park, backing on to a grammar school in Leicester.

‘The space was even marked R as well,’ says Charlie Barr, director of Studio MB, who led the project.

Following a tender process, Studio MB was appointed by Leicester Council, which has worked in partnership with the University of Leicester to bring the exhibition to bear.

The consultancy was tasked with branding the Richard III Visitor Centre, creating an interpretive experience and exhibition design.

An RIII mark has been created as a ‘shorthand’ according to Barr, who says it is memorable and international and ‘references our current monarch’s cypher EIIR’.

The crown has ben drawn from historical reference material including stained glass windows, statues and paintings.

An exhibition strap line has been devised to reflect its scope – Dynasty, Death and Discovery.

The grammar school has been relocated to make room for a two-floor exhibition and an extension is planned, which will cover the open burial site, ‘like a glass box,’ says Barr.

It is unclear at the moment whether the body will be reinterred in the adjacent Leicester Cathedral, or in York Minster, which is also making a claim for the remains.

Barr says the ground floor of the exhibition, ‘explores Richard’s life from a boy born into a family power struggle fighting for the throne of England and a country at war with itself. This upbringing, with death and violence all around, greatly influenced the man he was about to become.’

AV and interactive experiences tell this story and will include a recreation of the Battle of Bosworth Field.

This image shows how visitors can peer through arches to ‘look into the past’ where they will find representations of Richard’s wife and brother and other characters which are ‘brought to life,’ says Barr.

Richard III
A recreation of Richard III’s life
Elsewhere interactive games will allow visitors to play juror as to who was responsible for the disappearance of the Princes in the Tower – Edward V of England, and Richard Shrewsbury, Duke of York. Richard was the Uncle and protector of Edward V, natural heir to the throne.

On the first floor, the story is picked up 528 years later. Richard’s body was discovered from an archeological dig instructed by the Richard III Society, which set in motion a series of verification processes including radiocarbon dating, discovering that his hunched posture was caused by the condition scoliosis, and matching DNA taken from the body with that of known relatives.

Barr says, ‘On the first floor we explore Richard’s portrayal and betrayal, examining how his image has been manipulated, before telling the story of the discovery through the research and search, the archaeological dig and the science of proving the found remains were that of the lost King.’

This will involve an interactive table, made up like a CT scanning machine.

Barr says, ‘3D printing of Richard’s skeletal remains lay on an illuminated plinth where the visitor can explore for themselves through Pepper’s Ghost hologram display, the clues the archaeologist discovered.’

Visitors can isolate details such as a puncture wound in Richard’s head where he was killed, and another made by an archaeologist’s spade on discovery.

The attraction is expected to open late summer 2014.
Refresh01 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2014, 07:14 PM   #390
Refresh01
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 77
Likes (Received): 5

Complete unedifying farce set to continue. So much for the RIII Society 'remaining neutral' and 'wanting a swift and dignified solution'

http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/Ri...ail/story.html


Quote:
The battle over where Richard III should be laid to rest looks set to rumble on, as those who began the search for the last Plantagenet king say they will mount their own legal challenge if an ongoing one by his descendants fails.

The skeleton of the king - whose death at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485 brought an end to the Wars of the Roses - was found under a car park in Leicester in September 2012.

Following the astonishing find, the then Justice Secretary, Ken Clarke, gave permission for the body to be re-interred in Leicester Cathedral - a decision which is now being challenged at London's High Court by The Plantagenet Alliance Ltd, a campaign group founded by Richard III's 16th great-nephew, Stephen Nicolay.

Lawyers for the alliance argue Mr Clarke should have consulted the public and others about the burial before making the decision that the remains should stay in Leicester.

But Philippa Langley and Dr John Ashdown-Hill, whose work on the Looking for Richard project led to the discovery of the king's skeleton, say they will take legal action if the High Court upholds the secretary of state's decision.

Ms Langley interrupted today's High Court proceedings to tell three of the country's top judges that the arguments being put forward were 'flawed'.

From her seat at the back of the public gallery, she said: "I'm sorry, I have to say something, so much of the information here is being misrepresented."

Following her outburst, Lady Justice Hallett said the court could not hear evidence but, given that the remains would not have been discovered without Ms Langley's input, allowed her to pass the judges a note outlining her objections.

Speaking outside court, Ms Langley said she would never have gone ahead with the archaeological dig which led to Richard III's discovery, if she had realised plans would be made to bury the king's remains as an 'archaeological specimen' - meaning they could be dug up for future research.

She said that, when she first set about getting a licence to exhume remains, she made an agreement that - in the event any skeleton was identified as being that of Richard III - it would be taken to a place of sanctity and then reburied.

"The whole ethos of this project was that it wasn't an archaeological dig, it wasn't a trophy hunt, it was about burying someone who was a casualty of war," she said. "It was a reburial project from the get go."

She said those involved in the project had wanted to give the king the same respect that would be afforded to anyone killed in battle.

Ms Langley, who is secretary of the Scottish branch of the Richard III Society, also said she believed there should be a public consultation about where the king's remains should be interred and that further legal action is on the cards if the current challenge fails.

She added: "Consultation is what needs to happen. There are so many views on where he should be buried.

"If the court decides that full consultation is going to take place then we would be happy with that, but if not, then I'm afraid we are going to be in court."

Previously, the High Court judges were told the decision as to where Richard III is buried, following the 'unprecedented' discovery of his remains, should not be made on the basis of 'finders keepers'.

Noting that the issue attracted worldwide attention and evoked 'powerful emotion on all sides', Gerard Clarke, for the Plantagenet Alliance, said: "The public law of England and Wales is not the law of the playground.

"These proceedings seek to ensure that the decision as to where to bury the king is made again following proper consultation."

Mr Clarke said it would be 'silly' to say that widespread DNA testing to determine which members of the public are descendants of the Plantagenet dynasty should take place, before consulting those that were.

But he added that weight should be given to the views of people who had taken the time to trace their family tree back to the king.

He added: "The Alliance's position is that there should have been a public consultation and/or investigation as to the appropriate place for Richard III's re-interment, either through the appointment of a panel of suitably qualified experts or through the solicitation of views from the public at large.

"A general public consultation would have been appropriate but the Alliance adds that the king's identifiable living relatives should have had an opportunity to have their views considered".

Mr Clarke also said the proceedings, which are expected to continue tomorrow, were not about 'arguing the toss' between Leicester on the one hand and York or Westminster - which have been put forward as alternative resting places for the king's skeleton - on the other.

He added that the views of the descendants didn't 'trump' all other views as to where the king should be buried, but were just one of the many things Ken Clarke should have considered - but didn't - before reaching his decision.

He added: "The Secretary of State did not inform himself. The sensitivities expressed by the descendants were just some of the sensitivities that were engaged."
Refresh01 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2014, 07:35 PM   #391
Lears City
Look there, look there!
 
Lears City's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Leicester
Posts: 6,509
Likes (Received): 40

I've had to re-read this article several times before coming to the obvious conclusion that the participants are mentally deranged...

Come on Langley. You wouldn't have gone ahead with the dig, if you thought Richard III's remains were going to be scientifically examined? What are you on about woman? How exactly did you think the University were going to establish the remains as Richard's? Also if this is all about the sanctity of Richard's remains, why dig him up in the first place?

Langley, your real feelings are known when you say "There are so many views on where he should be buried." Another York nut-job I suspect.

Quote:
Mr Clarke said it would be 'silly' to say that widespread DNA testing to determine which members of the public are descendants of the Plantagenet dynasty should take place, before consulting those that were.

But he added that weight should be given to the views of people who had taken the time to trace their family tree back to the king.
Clarke, what on earth are you whittering on about here? Weight should be given to the views of a few people who bothered to trace their family tree. Shut up you fool. You DO have to consult every person who is a collateral descendent of Richard III, for your arguement to have even a shred of validity. Nut-job.

Quote:
He added that the views of the descendants didn't 'trump' all other views as to where the king should be buried, but were just one of the many things Ken Clarke should have considered - but didn't - before reaching his decision.
The Plantagenet Alliance didn't exist, when the decision was made. Nut-job.
Lears City no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2014, 10:03 PM   #392
PlantaGenista
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 6
Likes (Received): 0

I'm not allowed to post links here, (very likely because I'm new here, and could be a spammer), but if you do a search for Mike Pitts' blog "Digging Deeper" you will find an article titled "Does handling of Richard III’s bones raise serious questions?", where he makes some valid points. Mike Pitts is a professional archaeologist and the editor of British Archaeology.
PlantaGenista no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2014, 10:53 PM   #393
Refresh01
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 77
Likes (Received): 5

Quote:
Originally Posted by PlantaGenista View Post
I'm not allowed to post links here, (very likely because I'm new here, and could be a spammer), but if you do a search for Mike Pitts' blog "Digging Deeper" you will find an article titled "Does handling of Richard III’s bones raise serious questions?", where he makes some valid points. Mike Pitts is a professional archaeologist and the editor of British Archaeology.

http://mikepitts.wordpress.com
Refresh01 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2014, 11:11 AM   #394
Refresh01
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 77
Likes (Received): 5

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lears City View Post
I've had to re-read this article several times before coming to the obvious conclusion that the participants are mentally deranged...

Come on Langley. You wouldn't have gone ahead with the dig, if you thought Richard III's remains were going to be scientifically examined? What are you on about woman? How exactly did you think the University were going to establish the remains as Richard's? Also if this is all about the sanctity of Richard's remains, why dig him up in the first place?

Langley, your real feelings are known when you say "There are so many views on where he should be buried." Another York nut-job I suspect.
Philippa Langley demonstrated her rationality when she was on film for the Channel 4 documentary I'm afraid. This was always the culmination of years of fantasies and the search purely an emotional, romantic tale for her and many of her RIII Society friends. That isn't a criticism btw, because without that drive and passion it is highly unlikely that the dig would have ever happened in the first place.

But her arguments are spurious at best, and if she decides to pursue some legal court case then I hope she is able to produce some kind of evidence of her claims to back it up; at the moment her complaints are pure hearsay and misunderstanding than any legal wrongdoing. If a binding contract was drawn up where she/RIII Soc paid the University to provide a service on their behalf, then you would think it would have been produced by now...

My favourite quote from her outburst yesterday:

Quote:
"The whole ethos of this project was that it wasn't an archaeological dig, it wasn't a trophy hunt, it was about burying someone who was a casualty of war," she said.

"It was a reburial project from the get go."
This shows her naivety in the extreme. Not an archaeological dig? What a bizarre claim. For her and the Looking For Richard team it might have been far more emotional, but the very idea that their majority partner (University of Leicester ARCHAEOLOGICAL Services) viewed it the same way is just odd. They were ALL about the Science, and together they made a fantastic discovery following best archaeological practice. Heck, in David Johnson's very own statement released last year he quotes the 'Written Scheme of Investigation for Archaeological Investigation (WSI)' as the agreement to which he refers being broken by ULAS.

If it is truly about reburial a) why did she not strongly contest the (very explicit) agreement that if RIII would be found he would be interred at St Martin's (and if she felt THAT strongly about it, why did she enter that agreement with ULAS?), and b) why is she promising to delay the reburial even further by threatening to bring another court case if the P.A. lose this judicial review?
Refresh01 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2014, 03:10 PM   #395
Refresh01
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 77
Likes (Received): 5

Not entirely clear, but it looks as though some kind of consultation will take place? (No explanation of who, what, and where; but at least it looks like it will be finally resolved one way or another by the end of April).

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england...shire-26576116

Quote:
A decision on the final resting place of Richard III's remains has been deferred.

The king's skeleton was found beneath a Leicester car park in 2012.

A group of distant relatives challenged a Ministry of Justice licence which would have seen the bones reinterred in Leicester cathedral.

The High Court heard demands the fate of the remains be put out to a consultation but the three judges said they would reserve judgement.

A decision is expected in 4-6 weeks.
Refresh01 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2014, 04:54 PM   #396
Lears City
Look there, look there!
 
Lears City's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Leicester
Posts: 6,509
Likes (Received): 40

That only says that the High Court "heard demands" for a consultation. I can't for the life of me think how a consultation could be enacted? Not based on what the PA have been asking for. Literally impossible.

Quote:
Richard III: Decision on reburial is due in next few weeks

By Leicester Mercury | Posted: March 14, 2014

Richard III would have raised an eyebrow at the thought of a public consultation to decide his final resting place, according to a High Court judge.

A two-day judicial review into the exhumation licence which states the 500-year-old king should be reinterred in Leicester concluded today, with a judgement expected within the next few weeks.

The claimants, a group of 15 people calling themselves the Plantaganet Alliance, are arguing the nation should be consulted about where the monarch – who was discovered in 2012 buried beneath a car park in the city centre - is reinterred.

This morning, Gerald Clarke, representing the Alliance, spelt out exactly who should be asked about the location of the king's reinterment.

Addressing the bench of three High Court judges, he said: “The Queen, Richard's descendants, the Church of England, the Roman Catholic Church, the people of Leicester, the people of York and the national public all have role to play in deciding.”

The Alliance's case is built around dismissing the Ministry of Justice's exhumation licence, held by the University of Leicester, which says he should be buried at Leicester Cathedral.

Mr Clarke argued that the medieval monarch's discovery was “unique” and the public needed to be involved in deciding where in the country he should be reburied.

However, his case was questioned by Mr Justice Ouseley, who said: “I would have thought he [Richard III] would have raised an eyebrow at the thought of a public consultation over where he should be buried.”

A packed courtroom chuckled at the remark.

Mr Clarke replied: “He would probably have two eyebrows if someone had told him he would be buried in Leicester.”

The Alliance's case relies on convincing the bench that a public consultation should be carried out.

However, all three judges – Lady Justice Hallett, Mr Justice Ouseley and Mr Justice Haddon-Cave, all repeated numerous instructions to deliver the submission in a clear and understandable way.

“It's pretty basic stuff to present your case clearly,” said Mr Haddon-Cave.

Eventually, Mr Clarke replied: “We're simply asking the government to have a public consultation.

“Recently on the legal aid proposals there's a public consultation and they're inviting representations from everybody.

“It wouldn't be difficult to formulate a similar process.

Submitting the case for Leicester City Council was Andrew Sharland, who also addressed the court today.

He said the comprehensive list of case law examples yesterday cited by his defence colleague James Eadie – representing the Ministry of Justice - showed there was no legal duty for a wider poll regarding the monarch's reburial.

He said: “It's clear that from the large number of cases cited by my colleague that there is no duty on us or the MoJ to consult and that there's no basis to suggest that any of the defendants have a duty to consult the public.

“It's time to let the remains of Richard III be buried in the beautiful and historic city if Leicester.”

Speaking outside the courtroom after the hearing, the Rev Pete Hobson, of Leicester Cathedral, said: "We have to wait. The case for the licence being upheld has been powerfully and ably presented, and we await the outcome of the review with full respect for the legal processes.

“We remain keen to proceed with our plans for the reinterment of King Richard III with dignity and honour on behalf of the whole nation.”
Why is it going to take up to 6 weeks to throw this rubbish out of court.
Lears City no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2014, 07:18 PM   #397
Refresh01
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 77
Likes (Received): 5

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lears City View Post
That only says that the High Court "heard demands" for a consultation. I can't for the life of me think how a consultation could be enacted? Not based on what the PA have been asking for. Literally impossible.
Yes, of course it does (I should read things more closely). I have no idea how this consultation should take place. And exactly what objectives these opinions should be measured against I'm sure I haven't a clue.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lears City View Post
Why is it going to take up to 6 weeks to throw this rubbish out of court.
£££'s...(says the sceptic in me).
Refresh01 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2014, 08:54 PM   #398
Robertj21a
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 17
Likes (Received): 0

I hope it's not just me who is losing any slight interest in any of this fiasco. It started out as very interesting but is now rapidly becoming the bore of 2014.

I'm sure some others will be sufficiently fascinated [why ?] to see it through, but don't expect all of us to whoop with joy !
Robertj21a no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2014, 09:31 PM   #399
Leicity82
Leicester - why not?
 
Leicity82's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: City of Leicester, UK
Posts: 9,141
Likes (Received): 23

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robertj21a View Post
I hope it's not just me who is losing any slight interest in any of this fiasco. It started out as very interesting but is now rapidly becoming the bore of 2014.
I agree. There are people out there who really need to get a grip on reality, as there are far more important issues in this world.
__________________
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Come on Leicester lurkers, join the forum!
Leicity82 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2014, 09:03 PM   #400
local_weasel
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 247
Likes (Received): 57

Rumours that it's not even him.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...g-results.html
local_weasel no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu