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Old December 7th, 2006, 06:32 AM   #101
SNT1
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Does anyone else think it's amusing and ironic that the Chicago Spire won't, in fact, have a spire but be occupiable floors all the way up?
haha

then again, the whole thing is a spire...
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Old December 7th, 2006, 06:34 AM   #102
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Yeah why the hell is it always so hard to get on SSP. Anyway, I dont see a problem with the building still being called Chicago Spire. Spires dont have too be uselss. They can have space inside them and still be shaped like a spire. Guess we will have to see the new renderings. BTW does anyone wonder if it will stop at 2000 feet. It seems odd the building would just stop at 2000feet. A more gradual culmination of the building would seem likely. Maybe getting an FAA waiver isnt that hard. Vegas has done it twice, and those two places were far closer to an airport!!
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Old December 7th, 2006, 06:40 AM   #103
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Originally Posted by The Urban Politician View Post
^ True. SSP's been suckin awful lately. Ptoooey!

To celebrate, I again commence in the consumption of Guinness beer, as a tip o' the hat to Kelleher's homeland
I didn't know about this on my way home. Bought a twelve pack of Natural Light, hey it is cheap. Otherwise I would have joined you in a toast drinking Guinness.
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Old December 7th, 2006, 07:24 AM   #104
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Originally Posted by NOLAUSA View Post
So will this officially have a higher occupiable floor than Burj Dubai now? If so, will this create some controversy over what building is actually taller, or maybe a sharing of the title?

Cheers,
Derek
BD Top floor will be at 2,047 feet.
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Old December 7th, 2006, 07:52 AM   #105
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This has gone from visionary to crack-smoking insane.

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Old December 7th, 2006, 08:02 AM   #106
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Ok...perhaps this is an ignorant question...well it is because I am not exactly sure of the criterion, but given this exciting news and the fact that there has been some dirt moving around at the site does this now move from pre-site pre=prep or whatever to straight site-prep??

Sorry if this is a dumb question but I think I am drunk with excitement!
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Old December 7th, 2006, 08:07 AM   #107
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HOLY SHIT.


*breathes* four years till i move to chicago... four more years....
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Old December 7th, 2006, 09:37 AM   #108
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STR, you forgot to put the guy wires in to keep the thing from swaying.
This borders on insanity. The Hancock's observatory is at 1000 feet. I can't imagine something twice that height. I'd have to lower the odds here. It had a much better chance at 1600 feet. I'm not sure of anything anymore on this building. So many surprises here. Is it always this way. Did the Sears tower go through so many design and height changes. What the heck is going on here.
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Old December 7th, 2006, 03:03 PM   #109
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/busine...l=chi-news-hed



Major redesign is latest twist in plan for spire

By Blair Kamin

Tribune architecture critic
Published December 7, 2006


The proposed "drill bit" skyscraper has lost its point but gained some heft.

The developer of the twisting spire, which would be the nation's tallest building, has overseen a top-to-bottom redesign that seeks to make the much-ballyhooed project financially feasible, and he will submit his revised plans to the city Friday, people close to the project told the Tribune.

Designed by renowned Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava for Dublin-based developer Garrett Kelleher, the tower no longer has a 400-foot broadcast antenna at its top or a hotel at its base. It is now all condominiums, 1,300 of them. The portion that modern-day cliff dwellers would live in has grown taller and wider, doubling the amount of sellable space to about 1.8 million square feet, said people associated with the project.

"It's all in the service of getting it built," said Kelleher's spokesman, Chicago lawyer Thomas Murphy. "If you're not going to have the broadcast tower, what are you going to have up there?"

Murphy hinted last week that the broadcast tower would be eliminated, saying, "the decision was not to get into a business that we don't know anything about." The Irish-born Kelleher worked in the Chicago real estate market from 1986 to 1996 but has no experience in broadcast towers.

His new plan calls for a 150-story building, with a total of 3 million square feet. That's 35 more floors than in the original design unveiled in 2005 by the project's initial developer, Christopher Carley, and 26 more than in Carley's revised version of the tower. The 1,300 condominium units would nearly triple the number of condominium and hotel units Carley envisioned in both plans. Kelleher assumed control of the project last summer after Carley's drive to build it sputtered.

The cost of the project has been estimated at around $1.2 billion, but developers recently backed off from that figure without providing a new one.

Because of the changes, Kelleher needs to go through a new round of city planning and zoning hearings for the project, which the Chicago Plan Commission approved in March when it consisted of a 150-room hotel and about 300 condos priced from about $600,000 to $5 million. While political approval is not expected to be difficult, it is unclear whether a slowing real estate market will support the colossal venture.

Soil-testing work started

The skyscraper would be built on an empty site along Lake Shore Drive and on the north bank of the Chicago River. On Wednesday, a yellow bulldozer smoothed earth on the site's north side. A sign posted on a chain-link fence bore the name of Kelleher's company, Shelbourne Development Ltd. The bulldozer was doing soil-testing work, which has turned up old foundations, Murphy said.

During a Tuesday interview, Calatrava, whose works include the birdlike addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum and the planned transportation center at the World Trade Center in New York, confirmed that he has signed a contract with Kelleher for full design and construction supervision services.

The architect expressed pleasure that the building's simplified top, in which the tower's twisting curves would culminate in metal fins protruding slightly above the roof, no longer resembles the needlelike spires of the Empire State and Chrysler Buildings, New York's two great Art Deco towers.

"We don't want to imitate something before," Calatrava said at the interview, held in the offices of the associate architects for the project, Chicago-based Perkins + Will.

"I am learning from Chicago," Zurich-based Calatrava added, using his ever-present sketch pad in an attempt to show how his tower recalled the simple silhouettes of the John Hancock Center and Sears Tower, the nation's tallest building.

Indeed, the skyscraper's form has become less twisty.

In the version approved in March, each floor rotated slightly above the one below it, and the tower made a 360-degree rotation as it rose. In the latest version, the total rotation has been cut to 270 degrees. There is more rotation now at the base and none at the top, Calatrava said.

Floors at the tower's base have become about 35 feet wider, Murphy said, but "the shape is the same" because the building is both taller and wider, he said.

The redesign extends to ground level, where plans for an adjacent six-story parking garage have been scrapped and replaced with seven stories of underground parking. That likely will prove an expensive shift because Kelleher will need to add a concrete "bathtub" to insulate the facility from groundwater.

Kelleher thought the garage's presence would blight the jewel-like tower, Murphy said.

The tower's footprint also has been moved slightly to the north, putting it just north of North Water Street, the small east-west street that slices through the Streeterville neighborhood and stops at the foot of the skyscraper's site.

That shift opens space for a circular drive to the south of the tower, as well as a grand plaza that would punctuate the end of the riverfront promenade leading to Lake Michigan from Michigan Avenue.

A `holistic vision'

And as he revealed with a model of the skyscraper, Calatrava has been laying out plans for the area around it, including pedestrian connections beneath Lake Shore Drive to the planned DuSable Park to the east. The model includes one of his signature cable-supported bridges, which would form a link in the lakefront bike path and swing open to allow boats to pass.

"This is a more holistic vision," Calatrava said.

Basic aspects of the design remain unchanged. The tower still would have a central core of concrete, ringed by concrete columns and floor space cantilevering outward from them. Its exterior wall would be made of glass and a still-to-be-determined metal to make the tower look light and reflective in contrast to the black skyline brackets of Sears and the Hancock.

But to accommodate the shift to all condominiums, Calatrava included four banks of elevators within the tower's circular core, one each for low-rise, middle low-rise, middle high-rise and high-rise units, respectively.

The plan remains to break ground in the second quarter of 2007, Murphy said.

----------

[email protected]



Copyright © 2006, Chicago Tribune

Last edited by BVictor1; December 7th, 2006 at 03:25 PM.
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Old December 7th, 2006, 04:23 PM   #110
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Just started reading my morning paper and so this new design. I was in love with an older version, but this one is not bad either.
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Old December 7th, 2006, 05:23 PM   #111
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I just received this...


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Kim Metcalfe
Weber Shandwick
[email protected]
Direct: (312) 988-2393
Cell: (312) 802-0211

Shelbourne Development Files New Design of “The Chicago Spire” with the City of Chicago
Community Groups Applaud New Look of 400 North Lake Shore Drive

CHICAGO / December 7, 2006 – Tomorrow, December 8, Shelbourne Development Group, Inc. will officially file for final design approval with the City of Chicago to build “The Chicago Spire,” a landmark 2,000-foot tall spiraling tower at the mouth of the Chicago River along the shores of Lake Michigan. The new plan includes several improvements to the original design that will enhance the building’s integration with the riverfront and minimize traffic flow through the neighborhood.

“We have taken what was a highly-innovative design and turned it into something even more desirable,” said Garrett Kelleher, executive chairman of Shelbourne Development Ltd. & the Shelbourne Development Group, Inc. “We look forward to the city’s approval and to breaking ground next year.”

Famed architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava, who is both the lead architect and engineer for the project, echoed Kelleher’s enthusiasm. “"The sculptural idea of an extremely slender building that twists as it rises has been retained. But, I believe the design is more mature than it was initially, and the relationship between the building and the city is better, which is something I could accomplish only with Mr. Kelleher’s partnership,” said Calatrava.

Tomorrow, the city planning department will begin reviewing the proposal, which calls for a property encompassing 3 million square feet and soaring 2,000-feet above the ground. However, unlike the initial concept, The Chicago Spire will not include a broadcast antenna, nor will it include a hotel or retail space. The number of floors has increased from 124 to 150, and the number of exclusive residences now total 1,300. The tower’s spectacular lobby will feature 56-foot tall ceilings and glass walls allowing for an unobstructed view through the base on all sides.

To maximize the property’s riverfront access, The Chicago Spire will be situated along the Ogden Slip at the northern end of the property. The new plans call for an underground 5-floor garage, which will sit under the building’s riverside plaza. The development team is also dedicated to the early development of DuSable Park, which borders the property to its East.

Kelleher and members of his development team, including Calatrava, conducted a series of introductory meetings this week with city homeowners and community groups with a presence in the Streeterville area to discuss development plans and the construction of the building.

“It was important to us that we had the opportunity to receive feedback from the community before submitting our design for city approval,” said Kelleher. “I am now even more confident that we will develop a building that the city and neighborhood will embrace and which will take its rightful place in the history of modern architecture.”

The earliest the city might approve the changes would be next month. For more information about The Chicago Spire and Shelbourne Development Group, Inc., see http://www.shelbournedevelopment.com/.

About Shelbourne Development
Shelbourne Development, headquartered in Dublin, is one of Ireland's leading property development companies, widely regarded as one of the country’s most professional and progressive developers. In the past three years, Shelbourne’s experienced team, known for its track record in evaluating and capitalizing on cycles in property markets, has completed in excess of 1.5 million square feet of construction in Ireland. It currently has a development pipeline in Dublin in excess of $2 billion US. Shelbourne is currently pursuing developments and projects in Ireland, UK, France and Chicago. Garrett Kelleher, executive chairman of Shelbourne Development Ltd & the Shelbourne Development Group, Inc. holds significant investment properties in Europe.
#####
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Old December 7th, 2006, 05:43 PM   #112
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150 floors? Very, very exciting. Overall, I prefer the previous design. Although I like the added girth of the present version, I'm not fond of how abruptly it ends. The spire provided for a more graceful terminus in keeping with the proportions of the building. Also, the older design's twists seemed more harmonious to me. This design has too many twists, and the twists aren't uniform. Instead, they are all bunched up at the bottom and middle portions of the building. Nonetheless, I still like the design and obviously want this one to end up being built.
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Old December 7th, 2006, 05:49 PM   #113
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Yeah, I really dislike the new design. It lacks the grace the old one had.
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Old December 7th, 2006, 06:44 PM   #114
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I agree, quantity over quality.
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Old December 7th, 2006, 06:46 PM   #115
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STR View Post
BD Top floor will be at 2,047 feet.
A better question perhaps is will the Chicago Spire have the highest residences in the world? I know that in the Burj Dubai the residences do not go all the way up to the top floors. Burj Dubai is one insane thing to top for the WTB title but if we can retain the world's highest residences title (currently held by the JHC) that would be amazing.

Chicago has been at the forefront of skyscrapers for living for quite some time now; Marina City, Lake Point Tower, JHC and countless others. Its quite amazing to think that after Chicago Spire opens four of the five thousand footers (JHC, TTC, WT, and CS) will have residences, now only if Sears and/or Aon had partial residential conversions as well. I have always felt that the upper floors of the tallest skyscrapers should be residential anyways, its cool to have an office high above the ground but even more awesome to live that high.
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Old December 7th, 2006, 06:50 PM   #116
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I like a new concept. Better than huge spire.
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Old December 7th, 2006, 07:37 PM   #117
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to me, the only thing that can top this 150-floor spire is a 150-floor spire with the 400-ft antenna.

love it
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Old December 7th, 2006, 07:53 PM   #118
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The previous design was so much more graceful. Im hoping that the rendering shown is playing tricks on the eye. I think he should relax the torque on the bottom half and carry it through to the top. Maybe with more detailed renderings I'll warm up to it but as of now, Im deeply disappointed with this redesign. This was my favorite project too.

Damn.
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Old December 7th, 2006, 08:03 PM   #119
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I prefer the old design. It had more elegance and grace, balancing the bulky, muscular Sears and JH. It started with a strong base and then almost faded into the sky. The new design lacks some of that graceful presence that I think our skyline needs. This really does look like a drill bit. Still impressive no doubt, but I'm not really happy with the change. Hopefully this will grow on me a bit.
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Old December 7th, 2006, 08:41 PM   #120
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No doubt the design will grow on me (and I do like the way the twists start off at a rapid rate then slow down as the building goes up... kind of gives the impression that the building is soaring up into the sky like a graphical asymptote), but holy hell, what kind of sway will you experience at 2000 ft??

I do agree that the new terminus at the top is.... well, kinda sudden. It makes the building look more like a chicago building, but I think alot of the appeal was the fact that it was a heavy break from the chicago mold.
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