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Old October 30th, 2005, 04:49 AM   #1
jmancuso
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Louisville\So Indiana Development News III

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Old October 31st, 2005, 04:28 AM   #3
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Done.
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Old October 31st, 2005, 01:31 PM   #4
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Museum Plaza design possibility

I found this image of the Dallas Performing Arts Center designed by OMA.. I think this looks spectacular.. if this is even an inkling of what may happen in Louisville, we're in for a real treat!

The Dallas building will be 11 stories... how great would this look at 26 stories on our riverfront!

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Old October 31st, 2005, 08:53 PM   #5
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^That is HIDEOUS! I would protest if they tried to build that. Oh well, Id take a big spire building over this anyday. I also think 26 stories is too small for this project. On the western edge of the skyline, this would be great at 40-50 stories.
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Old November 1st, 2005, 12:37 AM   #6
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It would be great at 40-50, but the site would be too small for a footprint of a building that size imo. I'm hoping it will be atleast the size of humana. I agree that building isn't very attractive. I want something that is unique and a work of art, but also fits in with the surroundings. The building in the pic would look wierd in Louisville, heck it would look wierd anywhere.
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Old November 1st, 2005, 12:51 AM   #7
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$25 million allied health building on JCTC's wish list
John R. Karman III
Business First Staff Writer
Jefferson Community and Technical College has major plans for its downtown campus -- including the construction of a $25.6 million allied health building -- if it can get funding from the Kentucky General Assembly.


A proposal to build a 100,000-square-foot facility that would be home to all of JCTC's allied health programs is a top legislative priority for the college. The building also would house a small clinic, laboratory space, a library, an interactive television conference center, computer stations, faculty offices, and student and teacher lounges.

College officials are considering building the facility on the parking lot of its main campus at First Street and Broadway or in the adjacent Louisville Medical Center, according to JCTC president Anthony Newberry.

If the college receives the necessary funding during the upcoming legislative session, site selection and architectural design work could begin late next summer or early next fall. Construction then would start in spring 2007, and the building could be completed 18 months later.

JCTC's allied health programs currently are scattered among its downtown campus, its Jefferson Technical Campus on Chestnut Street and its campus in southwest Jefferson County.

Students being turned away from needed classes
Steven Spalding, executive director of the Louisville Medical Center Development Corp., said that although no formal discussions have been held about where to build an allied health facility, he is aware and supportive of JCTC's needs.

The LMCDC is redeveloping the former Hay*market block bounded by Jefferson, Floyd, Preston and Market streets, which could possibly accommodate the college. "If we can collaborate with them, accomplish our goals and help them advance their goals, that's part of what LMCDC was set up to do," Spalding said.

Newberry said a new building is needed to help the college meet the demand for trained students to work at hospitals in the Louisville Medical Center and throughout the community. Existing JCTC facilities are outdated and overcrowded, which causes many students to be delayed in taking the courses they need, he explained.

And there are waiting lists for courses such as anatomy, physiology and microbiology, which are prerequisites for most health care majors.

"In any given semester, we turn away 200 or more students from those classes," Newberry said.

$12.3 million in renovations planned
In addition to building a new facility, JCTC officials hope to make $12.3 million in improvements to two existing structures on its downtown campus, Hartford Tower and the Seminary Building. Again, those upgrades would be contingent on receiving funding from the General Assembly.


Hartford Tower, a 12-story classroom build*ing that houses the college's science labs, would receive a major overhaul, including the addition of new labs. The tower has not been renovated since it opened in 1971.

The Seminary Building, the Gothic-style centerpiece of JCTC's campus, also would be renovated and stabilized in the project.

JCTC's allied health building project ranks No. 3 on the list of fiscal 2006-08 capital projects priorities for the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, the body that oversees 16 community and technical schools on 65 campuses across the state.

The top project is $15 million requested for capital renewal and maintenance needs systemwide. No. 2 is $16.5 million for a technology center at West Kentucky Community and Technical College in Paducah.

JCTC's $12.3 million renovation proposal ranks No. 9.

Projects garner local support
Newberry said he is encouraged by the response he has received from legislators and health care community leaders familiar with the college's plans.

State Rep. Joni Jenkins, a Shively Democrat who heads the Jefferson County legislative delegation, could not be reached to comment on the likelihood of funding for the projects prior to Business First's press deadline.

"We recognize that it's going to be a difficult session and that the budget will be tight," Newberry said. "We're optimistic that our case ... will be heard and understood."

The need for allied health professionals is growing and will reach a critical stage around 2010 with the retirement of many baby boomers, according to Tony Bohn, vice president of human resources for Baptist Hospital East. "It's going to be important that we are creating access to those allied health programs for folks to continue to grow the health care work force," he said.

Michael Gritton, executive director of KentuckianaWorks, a quasi-public, work-force development agency, also sees the JCTC projects filling an urgent need. Turning students away from needed classes because of a lack of space is "a tragedy," he added.

Contact the writer via e-mail at JKARMAN@BIZJOURNALS.COM.
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Old November 1st, 2005, 01:02 AM   #8
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Speaking of the LCDMC and the development of the Haymarket site, I uncovered an article from 2004 that said if the demand arises, they will build another building on the Haymarket site. Now that Medventure has left for Jeffersonville, however, Medcenter 1 will lose its huge anchor tenant, and they will have to fill that. I dont expect the Haymarket site to be developed soon--which OUTRAGES me considering it was a perfectly nice, historic, and still used building that they demolished for no reason. The city should enact an ordiance that says as soon as you get a permit to tear something down, you have to immediately build something of equal value. Otherwise, dont tear the damn structure down for surface parking!

Another good example is the Brinley-Hardy building, which has been an empty lot for over a year. Apparently the Fleur de Lis condos will start soon there but who knows.
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Old November 1st, 2005, 04:32 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TripleFiveDan
I found this image of the Dallas Performing Arts Center designed by OMA.. I think this looks spectacular.. if this is even an inkling of what may happen in Louisville, we're in for a real treat!

The Dallas building will be 11 stories... how great would this look at 26 stories on our riverfront!

MMM Not so much...

I've seen a lot of the firm's work. This could potentially be hideous...
Yet I think that the Seattle library... (I think) not sure... Seattkle whatyever that is very famous which they designed is fantastic and, if that concept were taken, we could have an absolute gem.
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Old November 1st, 2005, 06:10 AM   #10
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The Dallas Performing Arts Center is EXACTLY the type of building that the new Museum Plaza complex needs to be. Not necessarily that same design (a little too boxy for the location) but something that definitely pushes people's buttons. Keep in mind that art doesn't have to be 'pretty' to be successful. Nor do the masses need to be wowed by it's beauty.

Most people would agree that The 800 and Waterfront Plaza look like crap but I love those buildings just as much as graceful beauty of Aegon's dome. Their quirky charms illustrate how Louisville's skyline remains a blank canvas of possibilities. Virtually ANY style of design is accepted here. Not the case in many cities with larger but more monotonous skylines.

Since this building is located on the edge of the skyline and it won't be one of the tallest buildings in the city, it gives the designer an opportunity to push the aesthetics beyond what is traditionally acceptable. And I say go for it.

Of course, this isn't the first time this has happened. What I love about the Humana building is not all of the praise that it has received. Instead, it's the number of people that point out how much they hate or despise the building. Here it is, 20 years later and people still talk about it. It has the ability to provoke a response despite the fact it is not (and never was) the tallest building in the city or the focal point of the skyline. The same can't be said for the typical buildings that have sprung up in most cities (hello Indianapolis, are you listening).


When this building is completed I'm hoping for the following responses:

A few 'It's pure GENIUS!!!'

A few more 'Wow, the building is weird!'

And a whole lot of 'What the F*CK is that?!!!!'

In the art world, that is how you know you have a winner.
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Old November 1st, 2005, 09:36 AM   #11
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MMK the Seattle Public Library:





If we had a huge tower that looked anything like this, I think it would be a hell of a sleek peice-o-work and a grand addition to the skyline.
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Old November 1st, 2005, 05:50 PM   #12
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i completely agree with cardpooch

in regards to buildings fitting into the skyline - the Humana buiding did not fit in at all when it was constructed. Keep in mind when Humana was built Louisville did not have the Aegon building, the LG&E building, or the twin towers with the lighthouses and red roofs. It really stuck out!! All there was at the time were slabs.

More than one architecture expert has said (and I remember the architect for the Aegon building - John Burgee; Philip Johnson consultant - agreeing) that Louisville would have continued to be a downtown of glass slabs if Humana had not been built. Instead, the out-of-the-box thinking that went into the design for Humana was an impetus for the creative design of future buildings in Louisville. We have Michael Graves to thank - indirectly - for the Aegon Center tower.

I agree with Cardpooch, the more people dislike the design intensely, the better chance it will stand of being regarded a work of art.
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Old November 2nd, 2005, 08:51 AM   #13
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Dug this article up, and it gave me a novel idea. Screw KY, build an NBA arena (or any pro arena) on 150 acres of prime riverfront property being vacated by Colgate in Clarksville! Think about it: the state line that separates us is only arbitrary and was drawn 200 years ago. Economically and functionally, that is the north side of downtown Louisville. Nashville would look at both sides of the Cumberland to build an arena, whats an arbitrary political boundry to stop Louisivlle? Louisville officials should hop on this too bc it would ultimately help the region.

Indiana knows how to finance big arena stuff and get shit done. And gov't officicials in Indy already seem keen on pulling Louisville development over to S Indiana (see Medventure and many others). So why not a state of the art arena with ACRES of on site parking overlooking the Louisville skyline and containing an upscale restaurant with river and skyline views! Lure an NBA owner by making it a real estate deal:he can have rights to develop two luxury high rise condos on the site as well, similar to condos in Covington overlooking Cincinnati. The naming of the team could be an issue, but I'd say just call them the Louisivlle Colonels The article:


Talks turn toward keeping Colgate plant in southern Indiana

By JOHN L. GILKEY
jlgilkey@news-tribune.net
The International Chemical Workers Union has abandoned efforts to persuade Colgate-Palmolive to maintain operations at its Clarksville plant.

Larry Edwards, President of Local 15 of the International Chemical Workers Union, said the union will instead engage in talks to try and keep operations in southern Indiana after the plant closes Jan. 1, 2008.

Edwards said he and other union officials met with Colgate officials during the past two weeks to explore possibilities, but said the company cited the age of the existing facility, its poor layout, problems with material flow, maintenance costs and the cost of operating its wastewater treatment plant as reasons to leave Clarksville.

The facility's water intake system does not meet federal standards is another reason for Colgate-Palmolive officials to look elsewhere, Edwards said.

"In meetings with the union, the company proposed moving all of its dental cream operations, other than the Total brands, to its Mexico plant," Edwards said, "We were advised that the (Clarksville) plant was no longer a facility that was competitive for several reasons."

"Colgate is considering multiple locations for a new United States plant for the production of its Total brand, with southern Indiana as a possible location," Edwards said in a prepared statement.

Weston Sedgwick, public relations spokesman for the Indiana Economic Development Corporation, confirmed there have been talks between the state and top Colgate officials. He said those talks will continue as Indiana puts together its incentive package to try and keep the company and its 500 jobs in Indiana.

Sedgwick said he is uncertain what part the state would play, if any, in the redevelopment of the site. "Right now we are very focused on the area of keeping Colgate in the State of Indiana," he said.

Edwards said Colgate-Palmolive has indicated it will look at incentives from Indiana and other states as well as concessions the union is willing to make. "Colgate will need to get favorable government assistance, which the union has worked very hard to insure will happen. The employer would also require an agreement with the union that will allow them to apply new and different work rules than those currently in force, including establishing continuous operations.

Sources close to the issue, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said there are three potential local sites under consideration: the River Ridge Commerce Center and industrial parks in Jeffersonville and Charlestown.

No independent verification of those potential sites has surfaced.

Greg Fitzloff, president of the Southern Indiana Chamber of Commerce said he could neither confirm nor deny that the company is looking at those or any other sites.

"We can't comment on any discussions we have with any companies that have not decided to announce publicly," Fitzloff said. "We are moving ahead with efforts to work with local and state officials to encourage Colgate to locate its new facility in southern Indiana. We think we can put together a very competitive package."

Clarksville Town Council President John Minta, following Wednesday's concession the existing plant has no hope of remaining in operation, said Clarksville will begin to take a serious look at the redevelopment of the site.

"We will begin to work with them to see what we can do to help find a buyer for the site that will provide the greatest economic development potential for Clarksville," Minta said.

The town council president said two "trial balloons" have been floated in the community since the announcement of the impending closure. One called for the site to become the home of an NBA arena along with a specialty retail center while the other suggested the site would be the good location for a casino.

"Right now, nobody knows what's going to happen," Minta said. "There's 150 acres if you include the Colgate site and the land down to the river. That gives you a lot of potential for development."
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Old November 2nd, 2005, 09:30 AM   #14
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I hate Colgate for vacating Clarksville, but I think we have a chance of keeping them in Clark County, which would be great...so many families need this plant.

I do wonder what will happen to the plant in 2008. The facade is amazing, and I really do not think it will ever be used as a plant ever again. Clarksville has a lot of infrastructre issues along theriver that require A LOT of work...roads, sidewalks, industrial blight...I dunno how we're gonna turn this around.
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Old November 2nd, 2005, 04:08 PM   #15
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An arena in Indiana would make sense. Indiana has always delt with Neighboring state metros due to Chicago, but just seems to be realizing the importance of Cincy and Louisville now to the State's economy. Mitch Daniels (althought the spawn of satan) deos recognize the importance of "Regional economies," which is what got Indy's new Stadium and convention center approved by passing a "metro tax." Indiana could push this with metro Louisville's Indiana Counties. The views would be great...and Indiana could have a SECOND NBA team...or even its first NHL team. Of course, Mitch would DEMAND they be called the Kentuckiana _______.
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Old November 2nd, 2005, 09:01 PM   #16
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I could deal with a team called "kentuckiana colonels" or something but lol the name may get made fun of. It would be the only regional team (across state lines) in the NBA, and I can only think of the Patriots as another regional team. Cwilson, I dont know if our market would support NHL bc there seems to be no interest (we got rid of a few minor league franchies). Then again, weve learned time and again here that Louisvillians refuse to support half ass sports team. Give us the real pros or well just stick with UL and UK. Do you think ppl from Indy would come down to see a NHL game sometimes?

Anyhow, the prospects could be a long shot, but honestly, the way Indiana gets arenas built, it just may be worth approaching Mitch with the idea. A third pro franchise for Indiana would be a huge boon as well. It would help Louisville, although the idea of having an arena in Indiana would piss off a lot of locals who dont realize that it is a regional economy here and S Indiana is simply the "north side of Louisville."

Also with the extensive maturation of the S Indiana burbs and the bridge that will complete the 265 belt and connect Indiana directly with Louisville's wealthiest burbs, S Indiana possibly has the potential for MASSIVE growth, on the level of what N Ky is doing to Cincinnati.

Also, Cwilson, would the pacers really want another team in state though? Would they allow this? I mean, S Indiana really has no strong allegience to the Pacers; you will find more Louisville basketball fans there than anything (any local store has huuuge racks of UL stuff and even UK, even more than Pacers or IU, etc). Indy uses Louisville to boost its market for the Colts--they broadcast the games on the 50,000 watt 840 here. Presumably they need S Indiana/Louisville area, especialy since there is an ad in the paper every day advertising Colts tickets, especially preseason. But the Pacers, since it is basketball, dont draw any fans from here. So do you think they'd object?

Last edited by gych; November 2nd, 2005 at 09:23 PM.
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Old November 3rd, 2005, 02:31 AM   #17
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It sounds like a great idea at first, Indiana could actually get it done. But it starts to grow mold in my gut of what that might do to DT Louisville.
An arena in So Indiana could help some, or completely destroy DT efforts because that arena would be the place where residential and retail developers will want to go.
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Old November 3rd, 2005, 04:28 AM   #18
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If the arena were to be built in Clarksville where do you think the tax revenue and economic development will go? Southern Indians, Clarksville in particular. I would be completely against a southern indiana arena. Yes state lines are arbitrary, but tax money that crosses that arbitrary line doesn't benefit Louisville at all. Atleast if it spent in Louisville we get to keep some of it.( before the state take it) I do consider Southern Indiana part of Louisville, but building it across the river would insure downtown never gets an arena as well as the benefits that go with it. Southern Indiana is not the north part of downtown anymore than northern ky is the southern part of downtown cincy, or east st.louis is the eastern part of downtown st.louis. If anything northern ky has helped to suck the life our of downtown cincinnati. An arena in Clarksville would help to do that for downtown Louisville.
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Old November 3rd, 2005, 04:37 AM   #19
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Unfortunately, I dont think an arena will ever happen here. But in Indiana theres a chance. kentucky govt is in Frankfort and is too fucked up and backwards to build anything here. So Louisville needs to explore its options. By going to Indiana, maybe Louisville and KY will get embarassed into building one downtown.
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Old November 3rd, 2005, 04:41 AM   #20
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Is true that ky is backward, but we are closer now than we have been in recent years to getting an arena,if this deal falls through I say Louisville should by itself figure out a way to build an arena, without the state. All in all I say it's too early to tell whether or not the arena will get built, hopefully it will. However as we all know ky doesn't have a very good track record in investing in it's largest city.
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