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Old December 22nd, 2005, 10:25 PM   #1
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Docklands glass towers and affordable housing

New member here, hoping I am posting this in the right place.

Right then, I always wondered about those projects like npw which say that portion of the flats will be available at a discount to 'key workers'.

1. Who exactly are the 'key workers'?

2. Where would the affordable flats be located? I can't imagine bankers liking very much living next to the 'poor'. Will the teachers, med workers etc have their special little zone undeground, Titanic style or sumthink. (you know what I mean)

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Old December 22nd, 2005, 10:29 PM   #2
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1. doctors, nurses, firemen, teachers. really its a way of the govt having housing for its employees subsidised by the private sector so they can pay them less.

2. you have the wrong idea. affordable flats aint for 'poor' people, they are for govt employed professionals. mostly they are mixed in with the rest of the development on the lower floors. teachers and doctors are middle class who have been priced out of the housing market.
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 10:36 PM   #3
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Ok, thanks for the explanation. So would I be right in assuming that any NHS employee (say some system's analyst) working in the area can be considered for the scheme?
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 10:43 PM   #4
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basically. yes.
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 10:52 PM   #5
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The complex that I'm living in is probably quite typical of how it works. The key workers/housing association properties are the ground floor flats which obviously aren't as a in demand as 1st floor upwards and the remainder of a small block.

It all seems to work very well.
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Old December 23rd, 2005, 01:38 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gothicform
1. doctors, nurses, firemen, teachers. really its a way of the govt having housing for its employees subsidised by the private sector so they can pay them less.

2. you have the wrong idea. affordable flats aint for 'poor' people, they are for govt employed professionals. mostly they are mixed in with the rest of the development on the lower floors. teachers and doctors are middle class who have been priced out of the housing market.
Umm, not sure doctors could be considered to have been "priced out". All the docs I know are ******* loaded! Esp the GPs. Anyway, even lowly house officers would have no problem getting a mortgage of £200K. In terms of exposure to lending risk, doctors are a surefire bet...they get steadily richer and richer and never get sacked or made redundant! Even teachers are well paid these days...nurses OTOH are still -mostly- poorly paid.
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Old December 23rd, 2005, 04:39 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1980
Ok, thanks for the explanation. So would I be right in assuming that any NHS employee (say some system's analyst) working in the area can be considered for the scheme?
I dont want to put a downer on it, but I think it is only "Essential" staff on top of the previously mentioned grades that are considered (key holders, security staff). I am not sure if sytem analysts would come into that, but I may be wrong.
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Old December 23rd, 2005, 05:09 PM   #8
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teachers are well paid???? i know teachers on 19,000 a year. teachers get paid shit. doctors do too until they have been working for so long.
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Old December 23rd, 2005, 05:13 PM   #9
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30k after a few years is perfectly normal for a teacher. Judging from my wife's school.
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Old December 23rd, 2005, 05:28 PM   #10
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for secondary school teachers perhaps. infant school teachers get less despite requiring the same qualifications and having a similar work load. 30k is nowhere near enough to get a mortgage in london now btw. the ONLY properties for sale in london for 90k are garages or run down houses that require a lot of work.
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Old December 24th, 2005, 01:03 AM   #11
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I've interviewd plenty of teachers who are on more than that. On 30k it would be diffcult to borrow more than £120k but if you are a couple then no problem raising the mortgage the hard part is saving the deposit. The problem the government has that it has not broken national pay bargaining for public sector workers. Outside the South east Public sector workers earn more than private sector workers. The differential between wages in the South East compared the rest of the country is not great considering the cost of living. Unless substanially higher wages are paid in London and its environs then Civil servents will contiunally transfer out of the capital for a better standard of living. Just recently I helped a senior nurse get a mortgage for a nice house near Southhampton, all she needed to do was sell her two bedroom flat and she ended up with a smaller mortgage. Though she is earning a few thousand less, this is more than compesated by lower outgoings.
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Old December 24th, 2005, 01:29 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gothicform
for secondary school teachers perhaps. infant school teachers get less despite requiring the same qualifications and having a similar work load. 30k is nowhere near enough to get a mortgage in london now btw. the ONLY properties for sale in london for 90k are garages or run down houses that require a lot of work.
All qualified teachers are on the same pay scale, with pay depending on how many years experience they have. The start is about 20k, with the youngest age being 21 (for the graduate teacher scheme where you train on the job), with automatic increases for twelve years ending up at a bit over 30k by early thirties.

Teachers in primary schools get paid less on average because there are fewer discretionary points (a bit like salary nudge-ups for extra responsibilites) for heads to hand out. In secondary schools these go about like candy and can account for a third or more of some teacher's salaries.

Teachers' pay is basically good to begin with, but shit in the end. Even headteachers of big schools with thirty year's experience rarely get paid much more than 60k, not enough really, considering they manage a multimillion pound facility with hundreds of teachers and ancillary workers.

I wouldn't be a teacher for the money, and sadly they are well-paid when likened to many government employees.

Keyworker housing seems lke bull to me, for many workers are 'key' when you consider society as a whole. The correct answer would be to decentralize state functions to relieve pressure on the south-east, improve transport links so that cities can have a wider geographical spread, and disincentivize the ownership of rental properties (this would really ease up the market in my view).
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Old December 24th, 2005, 01:46 AM   #13
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Does this scheme for keyworkers, basically mean that you will own 50% of the property and rent the rest?
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Old December 24th, 2005, 02:33 AM   #14
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There are various schemes that vary from project to project and from housing assoc. to housing assoc. I would guess they are tailored to local needs. Some are most definately aimed at key workers to rent or buy or both. Some are just part rent part buy for lower paid workers. For instance my sister bought part rent part buy and she is low paid and not a key worker. Fifty percent is the usual split between householder and the housing assoc. although I think that with the current high prices smaller percentages are available to buy. The units that are allocated to these schemes are usually the lower floors (as previousley stated) or smaller blocks in less prominant positions within the development. These units are usually finished to a lower standard to those that are for general sale. Stangley the size of the rooms have to be larger in the social element than those that are private because of rules governing local authority lettings etc.
All developments of 15 or more units are required to have a social housing element, the percentage varies depending on the local authority and size of the scheme. Basically the local council/housing assocs. get what they can get out of the developer.
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Old December 25th, 2005, 07:14 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Osa Rey
All qualified teachers are on the same pay scale, with pay depending on how many years experience they have. The start is about 20k, with the youngest age being 21 (for the graduate teacher scheme where you train on the job), with automatic increases for twelve years ending up at a bit over 30k by early thirties.

Teachers in primary schools get paid less on average because there are fewer discretionary points (a bit like salary nudge-ups for extra responsibilites) for heads to hand out. In secondary schools these go about like candy and can account for a third or more of some teacher's salaries.

Teachers' pay is basically good to begin with, but shit in the end. Even headteachers of big schools with thirty year's experience rarely get paid much more than 60k, not enough really, considering they manage a multimillion pound facility with hundreds of teachers and ancillary workers.

I wouldn't be a teacher for the money, and sadly they are well-paid when likened to many government employees.

Keyworker housing seems lke bull to me, for many workers are 'key' when you consider society as a whole. The correct answer would be to decentralize state functions to relieve pressure on the south-east, improve transport links so that cities can have a wider geographical spread, and disincentivize the ownership of rental properties (this would really ease up the market in my view).
The head teacher of my school got paid something close to £100,000. My secondary school was close to being the biggest in England though.

Teachers in secondary schools are paid on average - above average, they are on average paid above the median wage in most london boroughs too.
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Old December 25th, 2005, 07:16 PM   #16
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The best thing is to get more housing built full stop.
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Old December 25th, 2005, 07:36 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Englishman
The head teacher of my school got paid something close to £100,000. My secondary school was close to being the biggest in England though.

Teachers in secondary schools are paid on average - above average, they are on average paid above the median wage in most london boroughs too.
Definetely true, if we are to take the average salary of 30k per Londoner.
Which is just as well really, it is a horrible job. Apparently some teachers can't even last a full week
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Old December 25th, 2005, 07:47 PM   #18
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My parents are both teachers, and i assure you that they are determined enough to get through a week, despite teaching at 'horrible' inner-city schools in Telford with 'the worst pupils ever'. Secondary school teachers can easily earn twice as much as Primary teachers, but of course it depends on the size of the school itself. Teachers spend a very large percentage of their 'free-time' planning lessons and attending meetings etc. It is quite common that teachers could spend from 8.00am to 10pm at work, if there are meetings, or school things like presentation evenings, prize givings etc. They get paid shit for the hours they do, but get longer holidays compared to pretty much everyone.
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