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Old November 11th, 2017, 08:39 AM   #2401
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Considering many of Ethiopian's competitors like Turkish and Emirates are four star airlines, this is a big deal. They're leaving behind weaker rivals like Kenya Airways and Egypt Air in the 3 star category.
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Old November 11th, 2017, 11:56 PM   #2402
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Wow, I'm surprised to see this. I've only ever flown economy, but my dad (who often flies ET business) says Ethiopian is nowhere near EK, EY, QR, or TK's league, which is to be expected. I've also gotten a lot of hearsay about service decline amidst potential political interference (which I've regarded as overstated), so it's good to hear some evidence to the contrary. Skytrax is reliable (unlike other award-mills you see sometimes), so this is a positive development.
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Old November 13th, 2017, 09:54 PM   #2403
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Just arrived in IAD today from ADD via ET Boeing 787. I have to admit - THEY DESERVE IT!
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Old November 14th, 2017, 05:07 AM   #2404
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Just arrived from JKD [edite: HKG] to ADD on 787. I agree!

I hope to experience the A350 soon. Although I fly international in ET every couple of months, it's always been on 787 and sometimes in 777. I heard the A350 is also amazing like the 787 but in a different way.

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Old November 14th, 2017, 08:23 AM   #2405
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Sky, same, it is also interesting that they maximize their business class seats by eschewing first (premier) class seats.

Btw, where is JKD at (airport code?)?

https://thepointsguy.com/2017/03/ins...ines-a350-900/
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Old November 14th, 2017, 01:18 PM   #2406
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Idealist View Post
Sky, same, it is also interesting that they maximize their business class seats by eschewing first (premier) class seats.

Btw, where is JKD at (airport code?)?

https://thepointsguy.com/2017/03/ins...ines-a350-900/
I meant HKG. Sorry

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Old November 14th, 2017, 04:10 PM   #2407
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Dubai Air Show: Ethiopian Orders Four Boeing 777 Freighters


November 14
06:10 2017

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by James Field 0 Comments


DUBAI — Ethiopian Airlines have announced a deal with Boeing for four Boeing 777 Freighters, valued at $1.3 billion list prices.
This order will boost the carrier’s 777 Freighter fleet from six to ten, bringing the total net orders for the 777 this year to 57.
For those carriers that order the 777, there are transitional options onto the 777X program if they so decide to choose.

Boeing Commercial Airplanes President & CEO Kevin McAllister said, “We are honored that Ethiopian Airlines, one of Africa’s leading carriers, has again selected Boeing airplanes to grow its operations, adding to an order book that includes the 737 MAX and 787 Dreamliner.”
“The 777 Freighter has no competitor in its class when it comes to low operating costs, long range, and capacity to carry cargo,” he added.
Tewolde GebreMariam, Group CEO of Ethiopian Airlines, who signed the new airplanes at the 2017 Dubai Airshow said, “This airplane order will provide Ethiopian’s Cargo & Logistics business with enhanced cargo capacity and better operating economics as we continue to build one of the largest cargo terminals in the world.”
The Ethiopian CEO said that “operating high-performance airplanes such as the 777 Freighter is a reflection of the airline’s commitment to expand and support the growing imports and exports of our country and the African continent.”
The 777 Freighter can fly 4,900 nautical miles and can carry at maximum 112 tons, highlighting the demand for long-haul cargo operations for carriers such as Ethiopian Airlines.
Ethiopian currently has a cargo fleet of six 777 Freighters and two 757 Freighters. These aircraft operate to 39 different destinations across the globe.
Further African Strategy

Back in June of this year, the carrier opened up their very own cargo center, which increased their cargo capacity to one million tons per year.
These additional aircraft are needed to cope with the demand that they are currently experiencing. For a carrier overall that has over 100 aircraft, cargo does roll well with passenger flights, so this extra tonnage will be necessary to connect onwards to the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and other long-haul destinations.
All of this additional growth is under the carrier’s Vision 2025 program, which is a 15-year plan to make the airline more profitable and to be sustainable in the growth that they achieve as a carrier.
And this program seems to be working, with the carrier surpassing all of their goals in passenger numbers, cargo uplift, fleet size, revenue, profitability and customer service.
The airline’s recent results has ultimately taken Ethiopian to win a four-star rating through SKYTRAX.
Out of this 15-year strategy, through their seventh year in, they have consecutively won the AFRAA (African Airlines Association) Airline of the Year Award for their continued progress in the African airline market.
These awards and recognition of success highlight that Ethiopian is capitalizing on this success through buying more aircraft and slowly expanding their portfolio to be the game-changer of the African cargo and passenger market. And as the carrier has grown by 25% over the past seven years, it solidifies the fact that they have found the successful strategy needed to thrive in the industry.
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Old November 14th, 2017, 07:06 PM   #2408
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Great news for ET on both Cargo and Award.

Interior color palette of seats needs improvement though. You need contrast so everything does not look like it is washed out.

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Old November 16th, 2017, 02:11 AM   #2409
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AFRAA: Safety, Connectivity, Blocked Funds, ATM & Human Capital Top Agenda for Africa

Posted 14 November 2017 · Add Comment

IATA highlighted five priorities which must be addressed for aviation to deliver maximum economic and social benefits in Africa.

These are: Enhancing safety efforts, Enabling airlines to improve intra-Africa connectivity, Unblocking airline funds, Avoiding air traffic management re-fragmentation and over-investment and Ensuring that Africa has the professionals it needs to support the industry’s growth.
Aviation currently supports 6.8 million jobs and contributes $72.5 billion in GDP to Africa. Over the next 20 years passenger demand is set to expand by an average of 5.7% annually.

"Africa is the region with greatest aviation potential. Over a billion people are spread across this vast continent. Aviation is uniquely placed to link Africa’s economic opportunities internally and beyond. And in doing so, aviation spreads prosperity and changes peoples’ lives for the better. That’s important for Africa. Aviation can help in achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, including the eradication of poverty and improving both healthcare and education," said Alexandre de Juniac, IATA’s Director General and CEO, in a keynote address delivered on his behalf by Raphael Kuuchi, IATA Vice President, Africa, to the 49th African Airline’s Association Annual (AFRAA) General Assembly in Kigali, Rwanda.

"Africa also faces great challenges and many airlines struggle to break-even. And, as a whole, the African aviation industry will lose $1.50 for each passenger it carries. Governments should be aware that Africa is a high-cost place for aviation. Taxes, fuel and infrastructure charges are higher than the global average. Additionally, insufficient safety oversight, failure to follow global standards, and restrictive air service agreements all add to the burden that stands in the way of aviation’s economic and social benefits," said de Juniac.

Safety
Safety in Africa has improved. In 2016 there were no passenger fatalities or jet hull losses in Sub-Saharan Africa. When turbo-prop operations are included, Sub-Saharan Africa recorded 2.3 accidents per million flights against a global average of 1.6 accidents per million flights.

Intra-Africa Connectivity
IATA urged the 22 states that have signed-up for the Yamoussoukro Decision (which opens intra-Africa aviation markets) to follow through on their commitment. And it further urged governments to progress the African Union’s Single Africa Air Transport Market initiative.

Blocked Funds
Airlines experience varying degrees of difficulty repatriating revenues earned in Africa from their operations in Angola, Algeria, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Libya, Mozambique, Nigeria, Sudan and Zimbabwe. "Practical solutions are needed so that airlines can reliably repatriate their revenues. It’s a condition for doing business and providing connectivity," said de Juniac.


Air Traffic Management
IATA called on African governments to avoid air traffic management re-fragmentation in the face of decisions by Rwanda to leave the Dar-Es-Salamm Flight Information Region (FIR) and South Sudan to leave the Khartoum FIR. "ASENCA, COMESA and the EAC upper airspace initiatives improve the efficiency of air traffic management by working together. I urge Rwanda and South Sudan to reconsider their decisions," said de Juniac.

Human Capital
Supporting that growth will need a much expanded labor force. "African Governments need to collaborate with the industry to better understand the industry’s future needs. That will guide the creation of a policy environment to support the development of future talent needed to deliver the benefits of aviation growth," said de Juniac.
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Old November 16th, 2017, 06:35 AM   #2410
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Yeah, Ive always wondered about the color theme of the planes' interior design

I know they are trying to incorporate the national colors (which I applaud) but there has to be a better choice of tone and placement
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Old November 18th, 2017, 06:58 PM   #2411
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Second Ethiopian 787-900 undergoing flight test for delivery.
ET-AUP named London.
https://twitter.com/JenSchuld/status/931635439374516224
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Old November 19th, 2017, 02:34 AM   #2412
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Jennifer Schuld at Paine Field
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Old November 19th, 2017, 07:57 AM   #2413
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Gibe,

Can you explain what we're looking at?
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Old November 19th, 2017, 10:48 AM   #2414
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What you see here standing between the two FedEx planes is the new Ethiopian Boeing 787-9 named after Beijing.
Here is the news.
Quote:
Ethiopian Airlines names latest airplane B787-9 in honor of Chinese capital

Source: Xinhua| 2017-11-19 01:20:06|Editor: Zhou Xin
ADDIS ABABA, Nov.18 (Xinhua) -- Ethiopia's national flag carrier Ethiopian Airlines (ET) announced on Saturday it has named its latest airplane Boeing 787-9 in honor of China's capital city, Beijing.
Speaking to Xinhua, ET's Corporate Communications Office said the airline decided to name the airplane after Beijing to emphasize its historical presence in the Chinese aviation market dating back to 1973.
China is the largest national market for Ethiopian Airlines which currently flies to five Chinese destinations: Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu, Hong Kong and Guangzhou.
It's also mulling starting flights to Shenzhen city, an entrepreneurship and innovation center dubbed China's "Silicon Valley," and to Hangzhou, home to Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba.
China is the single largest source of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) to Ethiopia for the last several years, as Ethiopia bids to attract Chinese expertise and money for its industrialization ambitions.
Private investment from China to Ethiopia in 2017, up to September 5, has reached more than 680 million U.S. dollars, outpacing full 2016 figures of 560 million U.S. dollars.
Chinese tourists are also a rising demographics with the East African country attracting 41,660 Chinese tourists in 2015, a trend the Ethiopian government expects to grow in the coming years.
here is the full picture of "BEIJING" Oct 13




Ethiopian #787-9 ET-AUO "Beijing" landing at KPAE after a B1 (first) flight to Moses Lake today. and this one is "LONDON" Nov 17




Ethiopian #787-9 ET-AUP (named "London" landing at KPAE after a customer flight today.
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Old November 19th, 2017, 03:23 PM   #2415
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Gimbe,

So we already have two of these birds?
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Old November 19th, 2017, 09:57 PM   #2416
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyliner123 View Post
Gimbe,

So we already have two of these birds?
When ET receives these two....it will have 3 in total in its inventory.
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Old November 20th, 2017, 05:36 PM   #2417
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There are four 787-900 leased by Ethiopian airlines to join it’s fleet. The first of these has already joined the fleet last month. ET-AUP named London is undergoing pre delivery test flight before delivery. It will be delivered by the end of this month. The other two will be built in 2018 and delivered to ET.
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 02:43 AM   #2418
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B787-9 (London) Test flight

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0jab_-LKuo
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 03:12 AM   #2419
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Posting BHL's find

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Old November 22nd, 2017, 03:18 AM   #2420
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Interesting read ...
https://www.citylab.com/transportati...rrible/546422/

Why Is African Air Travel So Terrible?


Taking a flight between cities in different African nations is often expensive, circuitous, and unsafe. But better days for travelers may be coming.

Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, is one of the biggest cities in Africa, with an estimated population larger than London and a skyline that peers over the wide, snaking Congo River. But if a traveler wants to go from there to Lagos, Nigeria’s commercial capital and Africa’s largest metropolis, it’s impossible to fly nonstop. Roughly 1,100 miles separate the two megacities—about the same distance as New York to Minneapolis. But there are no direct flights. Instead, a traveler will need to change planes at least once and pay a minimum of $1,200. There’s a good chance the journey will take well more than 12 hours.

Across Africa, the situation is similar. Commercial flights are infrequent, expensive, and circuitous. To get from one country to another, an African traveler may have to go thousands of miles out of their way to transfer through the Middle East or Europe.

The continent is home to roughly 12 percent of the world’s population and will be responsible for most of the global population growth over the next three decades. But it accounts for just 1 percent of the world’s air travel market. The flights that do exist are often more expensive than routes of similar duration elsewhere in the world.

“Time-wise, it can be a bit frustrating,” said Sarah, 29, an American NGO worker living in Kampala, Uganda, who asked that her last name not be published. Sarah routinely travels around the continent for work and vacation. This Thanksgiving, she’s flying to see friends in Bujumbura, the lakeside capital of Burundi, 450 miles away. The distance is roughly the same as Boston to Washington, D.C. But instead of a short 90-minute hop, Sarah will need to fly first to Kenya, change planes, then make another stopover in Rwanda. The trip will cost her more than $600 and take more than six hours; other flights that day would have taken more like 10 hours.

Why is it so difficult to fly around Africa? Blame a combination of protectionist legal barriers and regulatory hurdles, mixed with inadequate infrastructure, high taxes, and stubborn nationalism. Airlines trying to launch a new route between African nations need to first secure permission from both countries, which can be a lengthy and expensive prospect that may or may not involve significant bribes. Forty-four African nations signed on to a 1999 agreement promising to promote competitive markets and remove regulatory barriers. But to date, few have actually implemented the plan, known as the Yamoussoukro Decision after the Côte d'Ivoire capital in which it was reached.

Countries across the continent have displayed protectionist tendencies to limit others’ access to their own airspace. Those instincts began a generation ago, when newly independent nations sought to assert themselves by creating national airlines, and continue today. Yet even as flag carriers across the continent edge toward financial ruin, additional countries, including Uganda and Nigeria, are eyeing creating federally subsidized airlines of their own, in what University of Nairobi professor Evaristus Irandu called a “costly show of patriotism.” To prop those carriers up, countries may be reluctant to grant easy access to an outsider.

At the moment, that means that the airlines best positioned to dominate African skies are behemoths often based in Europe or the Middle East. “In the absence of competition, these mega-carriers have no incentive to lower fares,” said Irandu.

The problem is compounded by the generally poor state of Africa’s transportation infrastructure. Roads and rail links are limited, and the continent itself is vast: When Africans need to travel, flying should be the best option. Yet there are few large airports, major aircraft maintenance facilities, or training academies around the continent, so African airlines pay more than their competitors elsewhere. The continent has also led the world in major accidents and other safety incidents, partly because of the prevalence of older and outdated aircraft.

Various fees and tax schemes also contribute to big ticket prices. Taxes for fuel in some countries are more than twice the global average. The pre-tax base price of a KLM ticket from Freetown, Sierra Leone, to London is roughly $350. But several hundred dollars in fees and taxes are added by the time it’s purchased by the passenger, pushing the sticker price up to $825.

The largely empty African skies have a tangible economic impact on the people below: The economies of the planet’s’ poorest continent are missing out on more than a billion dollars in possible growth. In the U.S., aviation accounts for more than 5 percent of the country’s GDP, according to the Federal Aviation Administration, supporting nearly 11 million jobs and contributing $1.6 trillion in economic activity. As CityLab’s Richard Florida recently reported, hosting a major international hub has been a boon for places like Dubai and Singapore. Studies show that a 10 percent increase in airplane passengers increases the local service sector by 1 percent, and that a 10 percent boost in international flights causes a 4 percent growth in the number of large firm headquarters nearby. In other words, if people can get a direct flight from their city to yours, they’re likely to increase business relationships. If they can’t, they won’t.

Adopting open-skies policies would help encourage competition, which grows traffic by as much as double, according to a study backed by the International Air Transport Association, an industry group. Other analysis by the organization found that 12 leading African nations could boost their collective GDP by $1.3 billion and attract 4.9 million new travelers by implementing bilateral agreements. Ticket prices would go down by as much as 35 percent and trade would grow by $430 million. Ethiopia alone would benefit from 15,000 new jobs and $60 million in economic uplift—that’s as much money as Ethiopia received from China this year to build an industrial park in the resort town of Bahir Dar. When South Africa and Zambia reached a bilateral open-skies agreement, fares between the two countries fell by nearly 40 percent. Likewise, Morocco’s 2005 opening to European airlines dropped fares and more than doubled the number of passengers.

“We know that [aviation is] a driver of interregional trade,” said Adefolake Adeyeye, a research fellow at NTU-SBF Center for African Studies in Singapore. “We know that it’s very useful for landlocked developing countries.”

The best argument for liberalizing Africa’s air market comes from Europe. When European countries banded together to create a single aviation zone in 1993, annual traffic grew by twice as much over the next decade than in previous years. In its wake came a slew of low-cost airlines such as Easyjet and Ryanair. Subsequent growth expanded the European Union’s GDP by 4 percent. There is some indication that Africa would benefit even more. According to the World Bank, 20 percent of Africa’s tourism-related jobs are from foreigners traveling by air. In North America, that number is only 4 percent.

One African nation that appears to be eager to tap its air power is Ethiopia. The state-owned airline is the only profitable African carrier and has some of the best reach across the continent. Ethiopia is also investing heavily in a massive new airport, as well as an expansion of the current hub outside of Addis Ababa. CEO Tewolde GebreMariam has described infrastructure and human resource training as two of the four “pillars” of the airline’s 15-year plan, called Vision 2025. In the absence of a continental open-skies agreement, Ethiopian Airlines has sought out bilateral deals with other carriers, and GebreMariam has praised his government’s refusal to interfere with the airline’s operations. In the process, however, the country has ratcheted up its debts and outsourced much of its infrastructure financing to China.

Ethiopia was the world’s third-poorest country at the turn of the millennium, but since then has been one of the fastest growing economies and the continent’s biggest manufacturer. The flourishing of Ethiopian Airlines is just one small piece of that growth—but it’s not an accident that the country’s economy has ballooned as its airline has taken off.

As the continent looks towards the future, it’s expected to undergo a massive population boom: By 2050, Africa’s population of working-age people will triple to 1.25 billion, and its middle class is expected grow significantly. Nigeria is projected to overtake the United States as the world’s third most populous country. To improve the economic prospects for those residents, improving Africa’s air travel may be a strategy that leaders can’t afford to ignore.
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