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Old December 23rd, 2015, 04:54 PM   #681
elliott
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I really hope they consider cleaning the towers and possibly relocating the kittiwakes to new purpose built towers.
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Old December 27th, 2015, 11:07 PM   #682
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Love Locks on High Level Bridge

27th December 2015

A few pictures of the "love lock" collection on the east side, southern end of High Level Bridge. It's certainly growing.

DSCN2714 by stamford0001, on Flickr

DSCN2715 by stamford0001, on Flickr

DSCN2716 by stamford0001, on Flickr

DSCN2717 by stamford0001, on Flickr

DSCN2718 by stamford0001, on Flickr

DSCN2719 by stamford0001, on Flickr
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Old January 10th, 2016, 08:28 PM   #683
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
The Ovingham Bridge sage continues......

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...emain-10635130
Northumberland floods: Ovingham bridge to remain closed until new year 'at earliest'
22 Dec 2015 By Brian Daniel



A road bridge in Northumberland which shut following Storm Desmond days after reopening faces being out of action until the New Year “at the earliest.”[/url][/B]
Latest word from NCC is that Ovvy bridge will likely remain closed for several months.

What a farce
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Old February 3rd, 2016, 08:12 PM   #684
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A recent article in 'The Chronicle' on 1st February 2016, about a North Shields/South Shields Bridge proposal that never happened reminded me about the below early post (from 2009) on this very thread . . .

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Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
November 30th 2009.

PROPOSED NORTH SHIELDS- SOUTH SHIELDS BRIDGES

Over the years there have been several proposals for bridges over the Tyne between the river mouth and Newcastle/Gateshead. Perhaps the most interesting were those intended to link North and South Shields.

In the late 19th century Tynemouth and South Shields formed a joint committee to look at the possibility of a bridge but an objection from the Tyne Improvement Commission (TIC) that shipping would be obstructed led to failure. Another proposal from a company wanting to build a transporter bridge was ultimately defeated in Parliament.

In the 1920's more proposals surfaced; for an opening cantilever bridge, for a railway tunnel and yet another bridge to be accessed by spiral ramps at either end to gain the necessary height to overcome shipping clearance problems voiced by the TIC.

Other designs followed, for other cantilever bridges, one a novel cantilever swing bridge. Discussions between the councils and the Ministry of Transport for a road/rail crossing eventually came to nought owing to cost and TIC opposition.

Since then no serious proposals have emerged for a road or rail crossing. It is strange that a bridge to link the Metro system on either side of the river has not been proposed, perhaps as part of a joint road/rail bridge.

The favoured solution to demands for a new crossing seem always to involve a Howdon - Jarrow location, although this does enable linking of Teeside and the A1 in Northumberland, as with the Tyne Tunnel.

Cross-Tyne Bridge Proposals of the Past . . .

Road bridges at North/South Shields - 1887, 1893, 1901, 1930 (two proposals, one linking Tynemouth rather than North Shields), 1934.

Transporter bridge at North/South Shields - 1901.

Cantilever bridges at North/South Shields - 1926, 1929, (3 proposals).

NOW - Here is the mentioned Chronicle article of 1st February 2016 . . .


The 1967 'Golden Gate' bridge over the River Tyne that never came to fruition
By David Morton, The Chronicle, 1st February 2016


How a bridge over the River Tyne between North and South Shields, proposed in the mid-1960s, might have looked

Bridges. If you’re out and about near the River Tyne at the centre of Newcastle and Gateshead, you can’t really miss them. They’ve been an integral part of our regional landscape for decades - a transport necessity for those travelling North or South across the river. We recently published fantastic footage of the Tyne Bride under construction in 1927-28 on our website, ChronicleLive and on the Chronicle’s Facebook page. Meanwhile, who knows of the bridge over the River Tyne that never was?

We’re all familiar with the High Level Bridge, the Millennium Bridge, the Swing Bridge, and the rest, which are all magnificent in their own way, but imagine something as spectacular as San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge spanning the Tyne. This was the plan put forward by one of the region’s leading architects in 1967. It was the brainchild of Dennis Clark Slater, architect planner of Cramlington New Town, and would span “the Narrows” between Low Lights, North Shields and Lawe Road, South Shields. His idea for a graceful suspension bridge would employ the high ground on either side of the river, which would give it enough height for the tallest ocean-going vessels to pass below.

The bridge would have a span of 2,000 feet, compared to the 531ft span of the Tyne Bridge. It would be half a mile in length, and the estimated cost at the time would be around £16m - about 20% of the cost of an nuclear submarine, or the price of two Concorde aircraft. The plan was a non-starter, of course, and the Tyne Tunnel (today there are two tunnels) between Jarrow and Howdon was to be the preferred solution to the challenge of increasingly busy North-South traffic in this part of the world.

Having said that, a “Golden Gate bridge” near the mouth of the Tyne might have looked rather impressive.

Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...=FB-Chron-main
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Old March 7th, 2016, 03:20 PM   #685
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
A recent article in 'The Chronicle' on 1st February 2016, about a North Shields/South Shields Bridge proposal that never happened reminded me about the below early post (from 2009) on this very thread . . .




NOW - Here is the mentioned Chronicle article of 1st February 2016 . . .


The 1967 'Golden Gate' bridge over the River Tyne that never came to fruition
By David Morton, The Chronicle, 1st February 2016


How a bridge over the River Tyne between North and South Shields, proposed in the mid-1960s, might have looked

Bridges. If you’re out and about near the River Tyne at the centre of Newcastle and Gateshead, you can’t really miss them. They’ve been an integral part of our regional landscape for decades - a transport necessity for those travelling North or South across the river. We recently published fantastic footage of the Tyne Bride under construction in 1927-28 on our website, ChronicleLive and on the Chronicle’s Facebook page. Meanwhile, who knows of the bridge over the River Tyne that never was?

We’re all familiar with the High Level Bridge, the Millennium Bridge, the Swing Bridge, and the rest, which are all magnificent in their own way, but imagine something as spectacular as San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge spanning the Tyne. This was the plan put forward by one of the region’s leading architects in 1967. It was the brainchild of Dennis Clark Slater, architect planner of Cramlington New Town, and would span “the Narrows” between Low Lights, North Shields and Lawe Road, South Shields. His idea for a graceful suspension bridge would employ the high ground on either side of the river, which would give it enough height for the tallest ocean-going vessels to pass below.

The bridge would have a span of 2,000 feet, compared to the 531ft span of the Tyne Bridge. It would be half a mile in length, and the estimated cost at the time would be around £16m - about 20% of the cost of an nuclear submarine, or the price of two Concorde aircraft. The plan was a non-starter, of course, and the Tyne Tunnel (today there are two tunnels) between Jarrow and Howdon was to be the preferred solution to the challenge of increasingly busy North-South traffic in this part of the world.

Having said that, a “Golden Gate bridge” near the mouth of the Tyne might have looked rather impressive.

Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...=FB-Chron-main
That would cost £260m now, buttons compared to the £3.6bn for the proposed Kent to Essex tunnel which would not be that far from the Dartford Bridge.
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Old March 18th, 2016, 05:51 PM   #686
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George Osborne pledges to fix Ovingham Bridge after two years of closure

On Chronicle Live website on 16/03/16 this from Laura Hill

EXTRACTS

A Northumberland County Councillor is calling on the Chancellor to reimburse the £10m the authority spent so far



George Osborne has pledged cash to fix Ovingham Bridge, which has been out of action for two years.

Just days after the bridge re-opened following refurbishment in December 2015 Storm Desmond hit the region causing serious damage, closing the link for motorists and pedestrians once again.

The Chancellor pledged a further £130m for road and bridge repairs across flood-devastated counties including Northumberland, Cumbria and Yorkshire and said the funding will enable repairs to the Ovingham Bridge in the 2016 Budget on Wednesday.

Coun Paul Kelly represents Ovingham on Northumberland County Council and has questioned if the government will refund the £10m the authority has already forked out to stabilise the bridge since the floods.

“The county council has spend £10m and it will take another £14m to bring the bridge up to standard,” he said. “The county council wants compensating.”


Full article including Image Gallery and Video on http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ngham-11052325

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Old March 18th, 2016, 06:19 PM   #687
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Ovingham Bridge after the flood - some pictures 02/03/16



Received a text on Friday 18/03/16 from a friend, Forum Member and "my roving correspondent" Adrian Swall on subject of his recent visit to Ovingham Bridge:_-

Visited Ovingham Bridge last weekend following a walk along the river from Wylam.

Quite shocking to see how much debris has been brought down the river with an awful lot more sand on the riverbanks.

The bridge was reopened on Thursday the 3rd of December. There was heavy flooding overnight 5th/6th of December so was closed again. It is not now expected to reopen for months.

I have attached some photos and will send some more on a second mail if need be.

First photo: Some of the debris.



Second photo: Closed bridge from Prudhoe, south side of the Tyne.



Third photo: Sand and stone on Ovingham, north side of the Tyne.



Fourth photo: Bridge blue plaque - probably the quickest 'ghost sign' in the world.



Fifth photo: Scaffolding on western side of bridge.Cheers



Adrian's images hosted on Photobucket by me

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Old March 18th, 2016, 07:55 PM   #688
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken O'Heed View Post
On Chronicle Live website on 16/03/16 this from Laura Hill

EXTRACTS

A Northumberland County Councillor is calling on the Chancellor to reimburse the £10m the authority spent so far



George Osborne has pledged cash to fix Ovingham Bridge, which has been out of action for two years.

Just days after the bridge re-opened following refurbishment in December 2015 Storm Desmond hit the region causing serious damage, closing the link for motorists and pedestrians once again.

The Chancellor pledged a further £130m for road and bridge repairs across flood-devastated counties including Northumberland, Cumbria and Yorkshire and said the funding will enable repairs to the Ovingham Bridge in the 2016 Budget on Wednesday.

Coun Paul Kelly represents Ovingham on Northumberland County Council and has questioned if the government will refund the £10m the authority has already forked out to stabilise the bridge since the floods.

“The county council has spend £10m and it will take another £14m to bring the bridge up to standard,” he said. “The county council wants compensating.”


Full article including Image Gallery and Video on http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ngham-11052325

KEN
Am I missing something here? £24M!!! The Millennium bridge only cost £22M
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Old March 19th, 2016, 09:08 AM   #689
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Am I missing something here? £24M!!! The Millennium bridge only cost £22M

The refurb works were 3-and-a-bit million. Since the floods they've done almost nothing visible other than retrieve some of the buckled scaffold, so where Kelly get 10 million and another 14 needed I've got no idea.

Back in 2001 an entire new 2-lane bridge up or downstream of Ovvy plus link road to the A69 was costed at what would be £30m today, so this report strikes me as a load of cobblers on the whole.
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Old March 20th, 2016, 03:10 AM   #690
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Thought you guys might like to see this Tyne Bridges artwork from a very talented local designer artist.

https://www.behance.net/gallery/8003...ridges-Project
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Old March 20th, 2016, 08:23 AM   #691
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Am I missing something here? £24M!!! The Millennium bridge only cost £22M
Curious article. Is somebody is getting their facts mixed up? Northumberland CC bid to the government £24.3m for flood repair costs throughout the county and received £14.6m. This isn't just for Ovingham but other flood repair schemes throughout the county as well.

http://www.northumberlandgazette.co....oles-1-7804622
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Old April 9th, 2016, 11:46 AM   #692
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Newcastle and Gateshead: The High Level Bridge over the Tyne in 1910 and today

Courtesy of Dave Morton in the Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ridge-11160567
Newcastle and Gateshead: The High Level Bridge over the Tyne in 1910 and today
8 Apr 2016 By David Morton

A view of the High Level Bridge from Pipewellgate and Rabbit Banks, Gateshead, 1910


A view over the River Tyne from Gateshead, towards the High Level Bridge, Newcastle

The Chronicle was disappointed to report how the High Level Bridge has been the target of vandals. Just years after undergoing a £40m makeover, virtually every pillar of the pedestrian walkway, which links Newcastle and Gateshead , is now sprawling with unsightly graffiti.

But what of the iconic bridge’s history? Built to a Robert Stephenson design between 1847 and 1849, the bridge was opened to rail traffic, without ceremony, on August 15, 1849. It was officially opened on September 27, 1849 by Queen Victoria - and entered ordinary use on February 4, 1850.

It was built - and opened - more or less in tandem with Newcastle Central Station, for the first time enabling passengers and goods to travel between London and Edinburgh as the new rail network spread across Britain like wildfire. The High Level Bridge is a road and rail bridge and, even today, it’s well worth a stroll across this grand, old marvel of Victorian engineering.

Taken in 1910, from the Gateshead side of the Tyne, our older picture shows the familiar Newcastle landmarks of St Nicholas’ Cathedral, the Keep and All Saints Church. On the southern, Gateshead bank of the river, we see the long-gone slum area of Bottle Bank. Much was demolished in the 1920s, and over the years most of what remained has also gone. The last remaining buildings were bulldozed in 2001, making way for the building of a new Hilton Hotel.
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Old April 11th, 2016, 12:37 PM   #693
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Old Tyne Bridge - Land Arches

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Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Tyne Bridge Land Arches - 1932


Photograph taken by the Evening World but now out of copyright.
Scan hosted on www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
After many years of waiting I eventually managed to take some photographs of the land arches of the old Tyne Bridge, via access arranged by the Association of Newcastle City Guides.

The basement which contains the arches is presently being used as a store room and therefore access was very much restricted but non the less still an interesting view back into history.

The remains of the bridge are both Grade I listed and a Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM). This is the protection text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co...-#.VwtvGUeum34

Description: Old Tyne Bridge

Grade: I
Date Listed: 14 June 1954
English Heritage Building ID: 304843

OS Grid Reference: NZ2516463790
OS Grid Coordinates: 425164, 563790
Latitude/Longitude: 54.9681, -1.6085

Locality: Newcastle upon Tyne
County: Newcastle upon Tyne
Country: England
Postcode: NE1 3AF

NZ 2563 NW NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE SANDHILL
(south side)
24/503 Old Tyne Bridge
14.6.54
GV I

Part of bridge. Medieval and later. Sandstone. 2 land arches, part of one visible, the remainder obscured by later building; reached from cellar of Watergate Buildings. The eastern part has 5 wide ribs; the western part, a triple-chamfered arch, has 4 closely-spaced ribs. A scheduled ancient monument.

Listing NGR: NZ2516463790

Photographs taken 9th April 2016:
















Images copyright and hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...h/26366250725/

This article from the Evening Chronicle - date unknown. From the Jack Phillips Clippings Collection:

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Old April 12th, 2016, 12:48 PM   #694
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On this day in history - 12th April 1831

John Sykes gives this insight into events in his Local Records for this day in history, 12th April 1831:

Being the day appointed for the opening of the suspension bridge over the river Tyne, at Scotswood, about three miles west of Newcastle, the morning was ushered in by peals of bells from the churches of that town.

At twelve o'clock Archibald Reed, esq., Mayor, and John Hodgson, esq., M.P. for Newcastle, met the committee of management, the proprietors, and various other friends of the undertaking, at the Assembly Rooms, from whence, after a short time, on a signal being given from the guns of the Castle, the procession set forward in the following manner, viz:— full band of music, banners, banner of the bridge with the motto "Coelo pendit iter, ripas vinxere catenae," town marshal on horseback, sword bearer on horseback, the architect of the bridge (Mr. Green) on horseback, the carriage and four of the mayor of Newcastle, the carriage and four of the sheriff of Northumberland (George Silvertop, esq), the carriage and four of John Hodgson, esq., M.P., the carriage of Mrs. Hodgson, four carriages and four, containing the committee of management,

viz.:— Humble Lamb, Matthew Wheatley, George Hepple Ramsay, Matthias W. Dunn, Matthew Wheatley, jun., John Mulcaster, George Thomas Dunn, Joseph C. Lamb, esquires, and Mr. Thomas Grieveson, the honorary secretary; the carriage and four of Lord Decies, the carriage and four of Humble Lamb, esq., the royal mail coach with a flag flying, the guard blowing his horn occasionally; a long train of carriages followed, (between 80 and 90), and the rear was closed by a great number of gentlemen on horseback.

On the procession entering on the bridge, by a precaution which was afterwards proved to have been unnecessarry, the carriages passed over at a considerable distance asunder; and when the carriage of the rector of Ryton (the rev. Charles Thorp) approached the centre, it was stopped, and the blessing of Heaven on that bold and important work of man was most reverently and feelingly invoked by that reverend and respected individual.

Previous to its entrance on the bridge, the procession was joined by Charles J. Clavering, esq., the high sheriff of the county of Durham, who escorted and accompanied it on horseback during its progress through his county.

From the bridge the procession moved up the road to Blaydon, about a mile distance, then returned by the old turnpike road to Swalwell, from whence it again returned to the suspension bridge, which it again passed over in closer order than before.

But the strength of the bridge was soon after put to a much severer test, for as soon as the procession had passed over (no person being allowed to go on until the procession had returned) the gates being opened, the crowds of people, who had been previously assembled at each end, rushed with thoughtless impetuosity on the bridge, in the centre of which they were soon collected into so dense a mass as to be incapable of moving, and putting the bridge to a severe trial. No fewer than 3,000 persons were collected between the points of suspension, making, with those on the ends, a crowd of between 5,000 and 6,000 persons.

After re-passing the bridge, the procession returned in the same order to the Assembly Rooms, where it arrived about four o'clock, amidst the ringing of bells and other demonstrations of rejoicings.

Soon after five o'clock, the committee, subscribers, and other friends of the undertaking sat down to an elegant dinner, and spent the evening with the utmost conviviality. Many appropriate toasts were drunk. During the evening, Mr. Hodgson, on behalf of the proprietors, presented the architect, Mr. Green, with an elegantly-formed silver claret jug, on which was engraven a view of the bridge, and an appropriate inscription.

The bridge is 630 feet in length, the distance between the two points of suspension being 370 feet, with two half arcs of 230 feet each; the road-way rises in the centre about eight feet, causing the bridge to assume a curve-line of a graceful and pleasing effect; the roadway is about 20 feet, and the carriage-way 17 and a half feet. July 21st, 1829.

The first freight of stones for the masonry of this bridge was conveyed from Lawson-main quarry in a keel, which was highly decorated with colours; and immediately on being delivered, the first stone in the footings of the land abutments on the south side was placed on its bed, under the direction of the architect, and in the presence of Messrs. Grace and Ramsay, two of the committee of the undertaking. Messrs. Welsh and Son were the contractors for the mason-work.

The coffer-dam of the north pier was commenced in September the same year, and the foundation-stone laid on the 9th of February, 1830. The first chain was suspended across the river on the 23rd of February, 1831, and the last (the fourth), on the 5th of March.

Newcastle Libraries
003377:Scotswood Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown 1931

Type : Lantern Slide Description : A 1931 view of Scotswood Road Bridge. The bridge opened in 1831 and was a suspension or 'chain' bridge. The photograph has been taken from the Newcastle side of the river looking across to Scotswood Bridge. In the background there are houses on the river bank


https://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4076326126/sizes/o/

Newcastle Libraries
065281:Scotswood Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Allam T.


Type : Print Medium : Engraving-handcoloured Description : An 1832 engraving of Scotswood Bridge. The bridge was completed in 1831 and was a suspension or 'chain' bridge. Scotswood Bridge is shown in a rural setting with fields and trees in the foreground and in the background.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4090356990/sizes/o/

Newcastle Libraries
015280:Scotswood Bridges Newcastle upon Tyne 1966


Type : Photograph Medium : Print-black-and-white Description : A 1966 view of the first and second Scotswood Bridges taken from Heath Crescent Newcastle upn Tyne. To the right is the second Scotswood Bridge which is under construction. To the left is the first Scotswood Bridge which is still being used by traffic. The second Scotswood Bridge was not completed until 1967


https://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4077637656/sizes/o/
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Old April 12th, 2016, 02:01 PM   #695
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Would have been great to retain the old bridge for a pedestrian and cyclist crossing. quite a beautiful old bridge with the stone towers and chain links. What a shame but I suppose the money to maintain the bridge was the main factor it was demolished. a crystal ball at the time would have been helpful with the present and increasing demand for cycling routes. cheers
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Old April 14th, 2016, 11:13 AM   #696
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Would have been great to retain the old bridge for a pedestrian and cyclist crossing. quite a beautiful old bridge with the stone towers and chain links. What a shame but I suppose the money to maintain the bridge was the main factor it was demolished. a crystal ball at the time would have been helpful with the present and increasing demand for cycling routes. cheers
Still they dont learn..There is a bridge still standing that would fit this very purpose..The old railway bridge just north of the Scotswood bridge..All boarded up and covered in graffiti.
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Old April 14th, 2016, 11:03 PM   #697
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Unfortunately said to need millions to make it safe and only left in place as it carries pipes.
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Old April 16th, 2016, 12:45 PM   #698
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Metro Bridge - Queen Elizabeth II Bridge

The Queen Elizabeth II Metro Bridge caries the Tyneside Metro rapid transport system, trains passing between Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead, Built between 1976 and 1980 to a design by W.A. Fairhurst and Partners, main contractors being Cementation Construction Ltd, Cleveland Bridge and Engineering Company Limited and Hawthorn Leslie and Company Limited.

Built in two sections at the same time; one from the Gateshead bank and the other from Newcastle, it is made of steel, sections being prefabricated and then brought onto site to be bolted together. A total length of 1,181 feet (360 metres) and width of 34 Feet (l0 metres) it carries two tracks.

Costing £6 million, it was officially opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II accompanied by the Duke of Edinburgh on 6th November 1981.

Newly uploaded photograph to the Tyne & Wear Archives Flickr Photostream:

Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums
Metro Bridge nearing completion, 1978


View of the Metro Bridge across the River Tyne nearing completion, June 1978 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/4/CN11163A).

Tyne & Wear Archives presents a series of images taken by the Newcastle-based photographers Turners Ltd. The firm had an excellent reputation and was regularly commissioned by local businesses to take photographs of their products and their premises. Turners also sometimes took aerial and street views on their own account and many of those images have survived, giving us a fascinating glimpse of life in the North East of England in the second half of the Twentieth Century.

(Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk


https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/25760168724/sizes/l
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Old April 16th, 2016, 01:07 PM   #699
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
After many years of waiting I eventually managed to take some photographs of the land arches of the old Tyne Bridge, via access arranged by the Association of Newcastle City Guides.

The basement which contains the arches is presently being used as a store room and therefore access was very much restricted but non the less still an interesting view back into history.

The remains of the bridge are both Grade I listed and a Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM). This is the protection text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co...-#.VwtvGUeum34

Description: Old Tyne Bridge

Grade: I
Date Listed: 14 June 1954
English Heritage Building ID: 304843

OS Grid Reference: NZ2516463790
OS Grid Coordinates: 425164, 563790
Latitude/Longitude: 54.9681, -1.6085

Locality: Newcastle upon Tyne
County: Newcastle upon Tyne
Country: England
Postcode: NE1 3AF

NZ 2563 NW NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE SANDHILL
(south side)
24/503 Old Tyne Bridge
14.6.54
GV I

Part of bridge. Medieval and later. Sandstone. 2 land arches, part of one visible, the remainder obscured by later building; reached from cellar of Watergate Buildings. The eastern part has 5 wide ribs; the western part, a triple-chamfered arch, has 4 closely-spaced ribs. A scheduled ancient monument.

Listing NGR: NZ2516463790

Photographs taken 9th April 2016:



Images copyright and hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...h/26366250725/

This article from the Evening Chronicle - date unknown. From the Jack Phillips Clippings Collection:
Great pics Steve, as I remember it from when a friend had Casa [as was] above. The arches where also filled with soil [or 'muck'] quit deeply.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andym View Post
Unfortunately said to need millions to make it safe and only left in place as it carries pipes.
Yes, I d thought of that as a bike or garden bridge but it is apparently pretty sketchy, also someone raised the bridge toi nowhere question as the entrance and exit are a bit remote.
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Old April 16th, 2016, 04:36 PM   #700
daverobson
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Join Date: Mar 2010
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The old bridge looks almost identical to the one in Budapest. Should have kept it, it was nice!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
John Sykes gives this insight into events in his Local Records for this day in history, 12th April 1831:

Being the day appointed for the opening of the suspension bridge over the river Tyne, at Scotswood, about three miles west of Newcastle, the morning was ushered in by peals of bells from the churches of that town.

At twelve o'clock Archibald Reed, esq., Mayor, and John Hodgson, esq., M.P. for Newcastle, met the committee of management, the proprietors, and various other friends of the undertaking, at the Assembly Rooms, from whence, after a short time, on a signal being given from the guns of the Castle, the procession set forward in the following manner, viz:— full band of music, banners, banner of the bridge with the motto "Coelo pendit iter, ripas vinxere catenae," town marshal on horseback, sword bearer on horseback, the architect of the bridge (Mr. Green) on horseback, the carriage and four of the mayor of Newcastle, the carriage and four of the sheriff of Northumberland (George Silvertop, esq), the carriage and four of John Hodgson, esq., M.P., the carriage of Mrs. Hodgson, four carriages and four, containing the committee of management,

viz.:— Humble Lamb, Matthew Wheatley, George Hepple Ramsay, Matthias W. Dunn, Matthew Wheatley, jun., John Mulcaster, George Thomas Dunn, Joseph C. Lamb, esquires, and Mr. Thomas Grieveson, the honorary secretary; the carriage and four of Lord Decies, the carriage and four of Humble Lamb, esq., the royal mail coach with a flag flying, the guard blowing his horn occasionally; a long train of carriages followed, (between 80 and 90), and the rear was closed by a great number of gentlemen on horseback.

On the procession entering on the bridge, by a precaution which was afterwards proved to have been unnecessarry, the carriages passed over at a considerable distance asunder; and when the carriage of the rector of Ryton (the rev. Charles Thorp) approached the centre, it was stopped, and the blessing of Heaven on that bold and important work of man was most reverently and feelingly invoked by that reverend and respected individual.

Previous to its entrance on the bridge, the procession was joined by Charles J. Clavering, esq., the high sheriff of the county of Durham, who escorted and accompanied it on horseback during its progress through his county.

From the bridge the procession moved up the road to Blaydon, about a mile distance, then returned by the old turnpike road to Swalwell, from whence it again returned to the suspension bridge, which it again passed over in closer order than before.

But the strength of the bridge was soon after put to a much severer test, for as soon as the procession had passed over (no person being allowed to go on until the procession had returned) the gates being opened, the crowds of people, who had been previously assembled at each end, rushed with thoughtless impetuosity on the bridge, in the centre of which they were soon collected into so dense a mass as to be incapable of moving, and putting the bridge to a severe trial. No fewer than 3,000 persons were collected between the points of suspension, making, with those on the ends, a crowd of between 5,000 and 6,000 persons.

After re-passing the bridge, the procession returned in the same order to the Assembly Rooms, where it arrived about four o'clock, amidst the ringing of bells and other demonstrations of rejoicings.

Soon after five o'clock, the committee, subscribers, and other friends of the undertaking sat down to an elegant dinner, and spent the evening with the utmost conviviality. Many appropriate toasts were drunk. During the evening, Mr. Hodgson, on behalf of the proprietors, presented the architect, Mr. Green, with an elegantly-formed silver claret jug, on which was engraven a view of the bridge, and an appropriate inscription.

The bridge is 630 feet in length, the distance between the two points of suspension being 370 feet, with two half arcs of 230 feet each; the road-way rises in the centre about eight feet, causing the bridge to assume a curve-line of a graceful and pleasing effect; the roadway is about 20 feet, and the carriage-way 17 and a half feet. July 21st, 1829.

The first freight of stones for the masonry of this bridge was conveyed from Lawson-main quarry in a keel, which was highly decorated with colours; and immediately on being delivered, the first stone in the footings of the land abutments on the south side was placed on its bed, under the direction of the architect, and in the presence of Messrs. Grace and Ramsay, two of the committee of the undertaking. Messrs. Welsh and Son were the contractors for the mason-work.

The coffer-dam of the north pier was commenced in September the same year, and the foundation-stone laid on the 9th of February, 1830. The first chain was suspended across the river on the 23rd of February, 1831, and the last (the fourth), on the 5th of March.

Newcastle Libraries
003377:Scotswood Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown 1931

Type : Lantern Slide Description : A 1931 view of Scotswood Road Bridge. The bridge opened in 1831 and was a suspension or 'chain' bridge. The photograph has been taken from the Newcastle side of the river looking across to Scotswood Bridge. In the background there are houses on the river bank


https://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4076326126/sizes/o/

Newcastle Libraries
065281:Scotswood Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Allam T.


Type : Print Medium : Engraving-handcoloured Description : An 1832 engraving of Scotswood Bridge. The bridge was completed in 1831 and was a suspension or 'chain' bridge. Scotswood Bridge is shown in a rural setting with fields and trees in the foreground and in the background.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4090356990/sizes/o/

Newcastle Libraries
015280:Scotswood Bridges Newcastle upon Tyne 1966


Type : Photograph Medium : Print-black-and-white Description : A 1966 view of the first and second Scotswood Bridges taken from Heath Crescent Newcastle upn Tyne. To the right is the second Scotswood Bridge which is under construction. To the left is the first Scotswood Bridge which is still being used by traffic. The second Scotswood Bridge was not completed until 1967


https://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4077637656/sizes/o/
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bridges, historic newcastle, historic north east eng, history, millennium bridge, newcastle, newcastle transport, river tyne

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