search the site
 daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Asian Forums > India > Infrastructure & Transportation > Highways and Bridges



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old May 6th, 2017, 02:51 PM   #2421
philebus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 430
Likes (Received): 180

While expressways and higher speed open access highways are important for logistics and inter city traffic, rural roads are important for daily life and the last mile connection to villages, small towns and homes.

2016-2017 rate of rural road construction in India = 133 kilometers per day (a record rate in India's road construction history; this translates to an average of 32 habitations/villages/towns connected by road every day by workers in rural areas)

Target for 2017-2018 rural roads completion: 150 kilometers per day by the central government.

State governments have their own initiatives, apparently.
__________________

thirsty.traveler liked this post
philebus no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 15th, 2017, 03:04 AM   #2422
jinka sreekanth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: kadapa
Posts: 3,996
Likes (Received): 7306

Speed limits on highways likely to go up

The road transport ministry will soon fix new speed limits for different categories of vehicles plying on national highways and expressways.Sources said the maximum speed limit on expressways or access-controlled highways will be spelt out for the first time under a different category and it is likely to be more than the permissible limit on NHs.
At present, the maximum speed limit for cars on national highways is 100 kmph while it is 80kmph for buses, goods vehicles and two-wheelers.

In March 2016, road transport minister Nitin Gadkari had said the government could increase the speed limit on expressways to140 kmph. Again in September, he had said the proposed 270 km Delhi-Jaipur access-controlled highway would reduce travel time to two hours.He had told TOI that his ministry would revise speed limits for such highways where plying of any slow moving vehicle, including bikes, will not be allowed.

Times of india
jinka sreekanth no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 16th, 2017, 02:39 AM   #2423
bhargavsura
Registered User
 
bhargavsura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 10,662

That's like 85 mph. That's way too high. Will cause a lot of accidents.
__________________
जय हिन्द। मेरा भारत महान।
bhargavsura no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 17th, 2017, 12:08 PM   #2424
sidney_jec
Complex Equation
 
sidney_jec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 7,041

That Ajmer-Kishangarh Expressway has speed bumps on it. The minister needs to update the definition of the expressways and standardization of roads/signs is the need of the hour
__________________
ye bik gayi hai gormint

PS: Lord Murugan never deleted signatures. Never
sidney_jec no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 17th, 2017, 12:09 PM   #2425
sidney_jec
Complex Equation
 
sidney_jec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 7,041

Quote:
Originally Posted by bhargavsura View Post
That's like 85 mph. That's way too high. Will cause a lot of accidents.
dude, we Indians think in terms of kmph. I dont see the need to convert it into mph
__________________
ye bik gayi hai gormint

PS: Lord Murugan never deleted signatures. Never
sidney_jec no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 17th, 2017, 02:25 PM   #2426
bhargavsura
Registered User
 
bhargavsura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 10,662

Quote:
Originally Posted by sidney_jec View Post
dude, we Indians think in terms of kmph. I dont see the need to convert it into mph
140 kmph =~ 85 mph. I am comparing it to normal speed limits in the US. 70 is the norm where I live. In other states like Ohio it used to be 65 and I think they recently increased it to 70. I believe Nevada has a speed limit of 85 mph. But I still 85 mph is way too high and risky.
__________________
जय हिन्द। मेरा भारत महान।
bhargavsura no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 17th, 2017, 04:37 PM   #2427
adityahbk
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 381
Likes (Received): 225

Quote:
Originally Posted by bhargavsura View Post
140 kmph =~ 85 mph. I am comparing it to normal speed limits in the US. 70 is the norm where I live. In other states like Ohio it used to be 65 and I think they recently increased it to 70. I believe Nevada has a speed limit of 85 mph. But I still 85 mph is way too high and risky.
150 km/hr is quite normal in developed most countries with great highways. In Canada I have done 150 and was still really slow compared to people who were doing 160kmph.

I have done 140 on Mumbai-Ahmadabad and Mumbai-Pune highway a few years back.
adityahbk no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 17th, 2017, 06:11 PM   #2428
bhargavsura
Registered User
 
bhargavsura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 10,662

Quote:
Originally Posted by adityahbk View Post
150 km/hr is quite normal in developed most countries with great highways. In Canada I have done 150 and was still really slow compared to people who were doing 160kmph.

I have done 140 on Mumbai-Ahmadabad and Mumbai-Pune highway a few years back.
Uhh that's not a recommended speed. It is altogether a different thing that you break laws and go at that speed. I know there's severe fine to break law in Canada and go at higher speed than the limit. Anyways the point is, there is a risk for Indians who have no sense of driving or let alone traffic sense or courtesy. Actions like this can be taken for granted for Indians not really following laws or taking laws in all seriousness to follow speed limits that may cause adverse effects.
bhargavsura no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2017, 06:52 AM   #2429
philebus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 430
Likes (Received): 180

While major projects hit the headlines, at state and local levels, India has implemented numerous 4/6 lane projects. Here are a few by a group Patel Engineering, of which I know little.

Uttar Pradesh: Varanasi - Shaktinagar

Assam: Nagain - Dharmatul

Karnataka: Border to Avathi

Tamil Nadu: Madurai to Kanyakumari 1

Tamil Nadu: Madurai to Kanyakumari 2
philebus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2017, 08:32 AM   #2430
hobbes100
Registered User
 
hobbes100's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 354
Likes (Received): 48

I'm not sure about "numerous". Vast majority of 4/6 landing has been done by the central govt (NHAI). Incidentally, out of the 5 projects you listed, 4 were by NHAI.

I personally think 4/6 laning of national highways should go back to being owned by respective state govts. NHAI should provide funding, expertise (if needed) and ensure nationwide standards on NHs. But execution should be left to state govts - similar to the model used in US and other countries.

NHAI has become a bloated bureaucracy that can't seem to move the needle fast enough. Besides, most national highway projects seem to languish due to land acquisition and other "local" issues, where state govts can be a lot more effective. Handful of expressway projects by state govts has shown that state govts can execute ambitious highway projects if they want to. There's no reason they can't take over 4/6 laning of NHs within their boundaries.


Quote:
Originally Posted by philebus View Post
While major projects hit the headlines, at state and local levels, India has implemented numerous 4/6 lane projects. Here are a few by a group Patel Engineering, of which I know little.

Uttar Pradesh: Varanasi - Shaktinagar

Assam: Nagain - Dharmatul

Karnataka: Border to Avathi

Tamil Nadu: Madurai to Kanyakumari 1

Tamil Nadu: Madurai to Kanyakumari 2
hobbes100 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2017, 03:52 PM   #2431
philebus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 430
Likes (Received): 180

Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbes100 View Post
I'm not sure about "numerous". Vast majority of 4/6 landing has been done by the central govt (NHAI). Incidentally, out of the 5 projects you listed, 4 were by NHAI.
Hobbes100, you may be right. NHAI has finished nearly 30,000 km of 4/6 lane roads as of May 2017. But, in Gujarat, I have traveled with a rented car+driver on 100s of km of 4 lane state highways not built by NHAI. The links above were not intended as a claim against NHAI, but rather as indicator of state/local area projects. In another 8 other states I have seen good quality highways (between 85 to 99% very good, rest potholed filled patches or incomplete). Some of these are NHAI projects.

I am impressed with the recent improvements in 2-lane roads to smaller towns and rural regions, compared to what I remember in my visits in 1970s-1990s. We must never forget our poor and village-based brothers and sisters. Of course, if large logistical arteries (4/6 lane highways) are of poor quality, their traffic spills onto smaller roads, chokes them with traffic jams, and damages the smaller roads faster. For rural prosperity, arterial 4/6 lane highway networks in each state are a must. Other than NHAI, each state should have its own state projects highway authority. Parallel works and competition is good.

A nationwide construction and review standard is also a necessity, to reduce corruption, badly executed projects and a waste of funds. NHAI may be bad, but state highway authority can be worse. New committees or new organization names, staffed with pretty much the same people, don't change a thing. Such has been a problem in developing countries around the world.
philebus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2017, 04:06 PM   #2432
philebus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 430
Likes (Received): 180

Rules of thumb:

For every 1,000 people, economic empowerment to the poorest needs about 0.25 kilometers of arterial, all weather, high speed (~4 / 6 / divided 2 lane) highway. High density cities / towns need a grid within the settlement area.

For every 1,000 people, economic opportunities and social mobility improve significantly around 0.5 kilometers of arterial, all weather, high speed (~4 / 6 / divided 2 lane) highway.

For every 1,000 people, well developed economies feature about 1 kilometer of arterial, all weather, high speed (~4 / 6 / divided 2 lane) highways.

Highways typically have traffic lights, and are not expressways. With stop and go traffic, they still allow an average speed between 40 to 60+ kilometers per hour most of the time. Expressways feature 80 to 120 kilometers per hour most of the time.

With India's 1.2 billion population, this means India needs at least 0.25 * 1,200,000,000 / 1,000 = 300,000 kilometers of arterial, all weather, high speed (~4 / 6 / divided 2 lane) highways that feature averaged speed of 40 to 60+ km/hr.
__________________

Aryaved liked this post
philebus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 21st, 2017, 02:35 AM   #2433
philebus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 430
Likes (Received): 180

The 2017 report of Nomura Securities Japan states (Bloomberg)

Indian Roads A $100-Billion Opportunity Over Next Three Years

India already completing highways at the highest rate per year, ever in its history.

As major highway grid projects get completed, it becomes easier to build roads / housing / railway stations / water lines / irrigation / schools / emergency help services / rural and town roads quicker and more efficiently, because it is easier to move equipment, raw materials and talented hard workers to various sites. That is what happened in Europe between 1950s to 1970s, in China between 1980s and 2000s.
__________________

Aryaved liked this post
philebus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 1st, 2017, 05:03 PM   #2434
Bombay2Calcutta
Registered User
 
Bombay2Calcutta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kolkata/Mumbai/Dallas
Posts: 10,701
Likes (Received): 7108

Highways sector in the country to get major push under Bharatmala Pariyojana

__________________

Aryaved, diptadeepdas liked this post
Bombay2Calcutta no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 5th, 2017, 08:08 PM   #2435
Sachinviji
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Kaliyakkavilai,Kanyakumari
Posts: 73
Likes (Received): 77

Marthandam(Kanyakumari district-Tamilnadu) flyover construction works.
Longest steel flyover in south India.



Sachinviji no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 22nd, 2017, 12:31 PM   #2436
philebus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 430
Likes (Received): 180

The Economist, UK, has a review of Indian roads and other infrastructure projects in its July 25 2017 issue:

India's once-shoddy transport infrastructure is getting much better

If the link doesn't work try a browser search for:
India shoddy infrastructure better powering ahead
__________________
philebus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 22nd, 2017, 03:44 PM   #2437
bhargavsura
Registered User
 
bhargavsura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 10,662



Thanks for sharing. Its a good read. Hopefully the Indian ministers are looking at such reports.
__________________
जय हिन्द। मेरा भारत महान।
bhargavsura no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2017, 04:01 PM   #2438
fanboy111
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 263
Likes (Received): 2005

I have two questions

1) Is the Bharatmala likely to consist of mostly expressways?
2) Why has India not constructed enough expressways?
fanboy111 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2017, 06:38 PM   #2439
Crazyguru94
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: chennai
Posts: 710
Likes (Received): 496

Quote:
Originally Posted by fanboy111 View Post
I have two questions

1) Is the Bharatmala likely to consist of mostly expressways?
2) Why has India not constructed enough expressways?
There was no centralised policy of expressways before. Expressways were a SG planned activites which was not pushed by everybody. The reason ought to be funds. For a standalone project like an expressway which does not fall under any centralised policy unlike a metro, it must have been difficult to obtain funds.
Crazyguru94 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 24th, 2017, 09:14 AM   #2440
fanboy111
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 263
Likes (Received): 2005

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazyguru94 View Post
There was no centralised policy of expressways before. Expressways were a SG planned activites which was not pushed by everybody. The reason ought to be funds. For a standalone project like an expressway which does not fall under any centralised policy unlike a metro, it must have been difficult to obtain funds.
I think government should push for expressways now, Highways are clogged and often are a headache for cargo transportation. Expressways will make logistics simpler and more efficient. It will also be safer as compared to highways.
fanboy111 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
loop, traffic

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu