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Old January 11th, 2017, 05:35 PM   #761
newcastlepubs
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Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Following on from the recent forced entry the Council have now installed substantial reinforcement to the door breached on New Years Eve.

Lombard Street, 10th January 2017.



Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.c...%20-%20Vol%201
Let's hope that's not a permanent addition...
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Old January 11th, 2017, 05:39 PM   #762
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Tyne Bridge Pylon Doors

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Let's hope that's not a permanent addition...
Especially given that this is a Grade II Listed Building - hopefully the doors will be replaced to mirror the originals, we can all dream
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Old January 19th, 2017, 11:19 AM   #763
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Motorists face 8-mile detour as bridge to Bellingham is closed

Courtesy of the Hexham Courant @ http://www.hexham-courant.co.uk/news...f9c74eb0088-ds
Motorists face 8-mile detour as bridge to Bellingham is closed
January 18, 2017 at 4:31PM



The B6320 over Bellingham Tyne Bridge is currently closed from 9am until 3pm on weekdays for refurbishment.

This means that those travelling from the south must instead go via Lanehead and past Hesleyside – a diversion of over eight miles.

Northumberland County Council said that the work affecting the road is scheduled to be completed by February 10, while the remaining work is scheduled to be finished by mid-February. The work includes repairing masonry and re-pointing, as well as resurfacing works. A spokesman for Northumberland County Council said: “From this week we are using equipment which will not leave sufficient room for vehicles to pass. Off-peak closures will therefore continue but a shuttle bus is being provided for local school children.”

Some businesses feel they have been negatively affected by the closure. Elisabeth Freeman-Bradley, owner of gift shop New Horizons, said: “It is hard enough to get people to come into the village in the first place. Lots of customers have been complaining about it and how it affects them – it makes life a bit harder.”

Local butcher Hugh Thompson said: “Going through the period after Christmas it is always the quietest time, but it is very very quiet. There is uncertainty over whether people can get across the bridge so people might not bother coming back up.”

Read more @ http://www.hexham-courant.co.uk/news...f9c74eb0088-ds


Prior to its opening in 1834 the town was accessed by a ford. Writing in 1760 Bishop Pococke who was well known for his travel writings, passed through Bellingham and wrote “There is not one bridge over the North Tyne, but they have a summer ford at the town and a winter ford a mile lower called Bridge Ford”.

The Bellingham Tyne Bridge was designed by the architect John Green and originally included a single storied toll-house. It is a Grade II Listed Building.

This is the listing text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co...-#.WICAxFxWK34

Description: Bellingham Bridge

Grade: II
Date Listed: 7 March 1985
English Heritage Building ID: 239386

OS Grid Reference: NY8339983230
OS Grid Coordinates: 383399, 583230
Latitude/Longitude: 55.1431, -2.2620

Location: B6320, Bellingham, Northumberland NE48 2JX

Locality: Bellingham
County: Northumberland
Country: England
Postcode: NE48 2JX

BELLINGHAM B6320
NY 8283 - 8383
21/1
GV II

Bridge. 1834 by John Green. Ashlar. 4 broad segmental arches separated by
triangular cutwaters. Broad band marks base of parapet which is capped by
chamfered coping.

Listing NGR: NY8339983230

These early postcard views of the Tyne Bridge from my collection:







These photographs taken 26th June 2014:










Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.c...0Tyne%20Bridge
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Old February 10th, 2017, 03:18 PM   #764
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Five bridges and tunnels across the River Tyne that never came to be

Interesting article from Dave Morton in today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...river-12584727
Five bridges and tunnels across the River Tyne that never came to be
David Morton 10 February 2017


How a proposed 1967 'Golden Gate' bridge over the River Tyne between North and South Shields might have looked

They are much-loved and established aspects of the Tyneside landscape... The Tyne Bridge, the High Level Bridge, the Swing Bridge, the Millennium Bridge and the rest.

But today’s familiar views across the River Tyne could have been very different. There remain, in dusty vaults, records of a host of bridges and tunnels which were conceived and planned but never saw the light of day. Here we recall five Tyne crossings which never came to be:

1. A first Tyne Tunnel: Most of us will have queued at one of the two Tyne Tunnels that link the Howdon and Jarrow sides of the river. The first tunnel, opened by the Queen, has been in use since 1967. The second came into operation in 2011. But they might well have been long predated by a mid-Victorian version running between Newcastle and Gateshead which would have replaced the old Georgian Tyne Bridge. A Tyne Improvement Commission plan in 1864 considered a tunnel near where the Swing Bridge sits today. It would have been around 3m in diameter, 174m long, and 12m below the river bed, but never got past the planning stage.

2. The Tyne’s own ‘Golden Gate’ bridge: In 1967, Dennis Clark Slater, architect planner of Cramlington New Town, conceived a Golden Gate-type structure that would span “the narrows” between the Low Lights in North Shields and Lawe Road in South Shields . The suspension bridge would have a span of 2,000 feet – as opposed to the 531ft span of the Tyne Bridge. The estimated cost at the time was around £16m - about 20% of the cost of a nuclear submarine, or the price of two Concorde aircraft. The plan was a non-starter and the Tyne Tunnel (today there are two) between Jarrow and Howdon would be the preferred solution to the challenge of increasingly busy North-South traffic in this part of the world.

4. A new bridge around 1946, just west of the High Level Bridge: World War II was over and urban redevelopment was one of the many subjects on the agenda as Britain sought to rebuild much of itself. Thankfully the Percy Parr plan for Newcastle at the time never came to pass. Alarmingly, to accommodate the growing number of cars, the city as we know it would have been totally demolished - then rebuilt! This bridge appears to be part of those plans.



Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...river-12584727
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Old February 10th, 2017, 09:49 PM   #765
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Someone has mentioned in the comments about the 1969 Tyne Deck. What is that?
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Old February 10th, 2017, 10:53 PM   #766
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Godscrasher View Post
Someone has mentioned in the comments about the 1969 Tyne Deck. What is that?

This has been discussed on the "Newcastle as it Might Have Been" thread . . .


Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
December 14th 2009.

The "Tyne Deck" proposals.

These proposals were originally posted by WilfBurnsFan on November 4th 2009 on the "International Conference Centre" thread. I thought they definitely deserved an airing on THIS thread!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by WilfBurnsFan View Post
This was Ryder & Yates, in 1969:
"The development in visual terms of the monumental building complex in an area of historical development representing continuity of major achievements and thus unifying the aspirations of the Region... The destruction of a boundary and the formation of a new City of Tyneside ... The transformation of an area potentially the most vital on the Tyne, from dereliction to the centre of public activity, a symbol of re-birth... The upper Tyne transformed into a linear lake with all the advantages to be derived from the constant water level with its banks not exposed disfigured and eroded by an ebbing tide... A reservoir beneficial to the Water Company particularly on the completion of the Solway barrage for retaining water from the Lake District."

The deck would have contained in its structure sluice gates to control upstream water levels, locks to allow small craft through, and a salmon leap. "The principal function of the deck is to create an acceptable site for the erection of important public buildings that will be related to the new administrative boundaries, and to the Region. Acceptable in the sense that the Deck being part of the river is the common inheritence of Tyneside, reaching beyond reactionary parochial attitudes and, in terms of precise location, the historic centre of the people of the Tyne."
[Northern Architect May 1969]
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Old February 11th, 2017, 10:01 PM   #767
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This has been discussed on the "Newcastle as it Might Have Been" thread . . .
I love the concept, still.
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Old February 15th, 2017, 08:14 PM   #768
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High Level Bridge

Not sure what work is underway on the High Level Bridge but noticed this scaffolding up in Javel Groupe, Close, Quayside this afternoon, 15th February 2017.




Images hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-ellwood/
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Old February 17th, 2017, 12:10 PM   #769
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Bridges on the River Tyne - 1961

New photograph on the Tyne & Wear Museums Flickr Photostream @ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_ne...in/dateposted/

Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums
Bridges on the River Tyne
View along the River Tyne towards the Tyne Bridge, June 1961 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/2/26897B).

Tyne & Wear Archives presents a series of images taken by the Newcastle-based photographers Turners Ltd.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/32930963985/sizes/l
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Old February 17th, 2017, 12:43 PM   #770
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This week I had an absent bid at Millers Salerooms on an antiquarian framed photo of the Quayside and bridges. The oak frame of the photo had been made from timber of Pons Aelius, removed from the river in the early 1800s. My bid was forty five quid and it sold for fifty, on the hammer. I did buy some other stuff though.
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Old February 17th, 2017, 01:18 PM   #771
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Pons Aelius

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Originally Posted by David Aspinall View Post
This week I had an absent bid at Millers Salerooms on an antiquarian framed photo of the Quayside and bridges. The oak frame of the photo had been made from timber of Pons Aelius, removed from the river in the early 1800s. My bid was forty five quid and it sold for fifty, on the hammer. I did buy some other stuff though.
Did the frame have any provenance with it David?

Mention of the pilings from Pons Aelius was made in this posting from 2015:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
You might be interested in this excerpt from John Collingwood Bruce Life and Letters by his son The Right Honourable Sir Gainsford Bruce, D.C.L. (1905) - I've always wondered what happened to the cabinet mentioned below, made from piles from Pons Aelius.

1248 the bridge, which no doubt in its upper parts was constructed of timber, was consumed by a raging fire; great efforts were made to retrieve the disaster, and in the thirteenth century a new bridge was erected which we may call the medieval] bridge.

This bridge was destroyed by a flood in 1771, and was replaced by a stone bridge in 1775. In 1872 it became necessary to remove this bridge in order to construct the present swing bridge to enable large vessels to pass up the river to the Elswick works and other places above the bridge.

At the time Dr Bruce made his inspection, in consequence of the improvements which had been already effected in the river the low-water mark was one yard lower at Newcastle than it used to be. This circumstance made it possible to view the foundations to great advantage.

"Resting upon the framework of the pier, we stood in a manner high and dry upon what for ages had been the natural bed of the river, the stream still flowing past us on either side."

The first thing noticed was the piling of the stone bridge. Bay piles twelve inches square had been driven into the bed of the river, and immediately inside of them were sheeting piles six inches thick closely grooved into each other. On the space thus enclosed the foundation of the pier was laid. When the foundations were laid bare, timbers which were part of the piling of the medieval bridge were observed, In addition to the timbers which had been laid down to form the foundation of the stone bridge of the last century, and of the bridge of the thirteenth century, other timbers were to be discerned within the area of the modern pier which must have been used for the foundations of the bridge of Hadrian. The Roman oak was jet black, the outside of it friable, and the heart strong but fibrous. The oak of the medieval foundation was slimy, with a greenish tint of decay about one inch deep from the surface, the heart solid and of a brown colour. The timber of last century was quite fresh. The Roman piles were drawn, as were the other piles. The Roman piles with one exception were without a shoe, but the points were broken and torn, leading to the sup- position that the shoe had become a mass of oxidised iron which the partially decayed timber could not bring away with it.

On the 3rd of April 1872 Dr Bruce read before the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle a paper on "The Three Bridges, Roman, Medieval, and Modern, over the Tyne at Newcastle."

In this paper he gave a minute account of the foundations of the three bridges, illustrated by drawings and plans. He afterwards printed the substance of the paper with illustrations, including a very beautiful etching of the medieval bridge, by T. M. Richardson.

Dr Bruce was able to secure a portion of the piles of the Roman bridge and a portion of the piles of the medieval bridge, and he had a cabinet made of this old oak in which he kept a folio copy of 'The Roman Wall' and his copy of 'Hodgson's Northumberland' and other choice books which he especially prized.

He alludes to this oak in a letter to his son, Gainsford :-

"NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE, 4th April 1872.

" I am almost at a standstill with the "Lapidarium'; I am stopped for woodcuts, and besides that the Easter holidays have thrown things out of gear at the printing-office, I have got some more black oak taken out of the foundation of Hadrian's bridge over the Tyne. We saw distinctly the foundation of the Roman, the medieval, and the more modern bridge. The timber, however, must be dried very gradually; it will not be ready for working up into furniture for a twelvemonth. We shall have plenty of time, therefore, to fix upon designs."
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Old February 17th, 2017, 06:41 PM   #772
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No, there was no provenance, just a note stuck on the back, which I never saw, explaining the origin of the wood. There must've been a fair bit of wood pilings pulled out and it is probably a local myth, like saint's remains. Another recycling trope are the interiors of the Olympia, which was stripped out at least in Jarrow. Thanks for background sources on Pons Aelius. The Roman road, up the hill, must've snaked a couple of times perhaps.
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Old February 19th, 2017, 08:01 PM   #773
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Bywell Bridge

16/04575/LBC | Listed building consent for masonry repairs, re-pointing spandrel walls, wingwalls, arch barrel & parapets. Renewing/harpening approach grass verges to bitmac/rocbinda finish. Removing existing concrete flagstones and replacing with bitmac/rocbinda. Repair gullies/drainage. - | Bywell Bridge B6309/06 Bywell Hexham Northumberland
Reference 16/04575/LBC
Alternative Reference Not Available
Application Received Fri 09 Dec 2016
Application Validated Fri 09 Dec 2016
Address Bywell Bridge B6309/06 Bywell Hexham Northumberland
Proposal Listed building consent for masonry repairs, re-pointing spandrel walls, wingwalls, arch barrel & parapets. Renewing/harpening approach grass verges to bitmac/rocbinda finish. Removing existing concrete flagstones and replacing with bitmac/rocbinda. Repair gullies/drainage.
Status Decided
Decision Application Permitted
Decision Issued Date Wed 15 Feb 2017
https://publicaccess.northumberland....=OI2STWQS0IG00

Grade II Listed, this is the listing text courtesy of the Historic England web site @ https://historicengland.org.uk/listi...-entry/1154576

BYWELL BRIDGE OVER RIVER TYNE (THAT PART IN BROOMLEY AND STOCKSFIELD PARISH)

BROOMLEY AND STOCKSFIELD B 6309 NZ 06 SE

5/77
Bywell Bridge over River Tyne (that 1 54.69 part in Broomley and Stocksfield parish)

II

Bridge, 1836-8, by George Basevi.

Ashlar, tooled except on parapet. 5 segmental moulded arches of equal height springing from hollow- Chamfered imposts. Cutwaters with curved faces below bold roll moulding, upper parts triangular in plan with bold hollow-chamfered top cornice. Moulded cornice below parapet which has moulded plinth and cornice and a raised panel above each arch; similar internal face to parapet, segmental coping. Serpentine wing walls. 2 plainer flood arches, without parapet, on south.

Partly in Bywell parish.

Listing NGR: NZ0519761964
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Old Today, 06:56 PM   #774
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How the Tyne Bridge was built - and the consequences that came with it

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ences-12636060
How the Tyne Bridge was built - and the consequences that came with it
Sonia Sharma 21 February 2017


Pictures of the building of the Tyne Bridge which were commissioned by the building firm Dorman Long for engineer and contractor's agent James Ruck (Photo: ncjMedia archives)

t was a magnificent feat of engineering that united both sides of the river.

Talk of constructing the famous Tyne Bridge - to ease congestion and encourage trade in the region - actually began in the late 19th century. But it wasn’t until 1924 that plans started to take shape. Work then began in August 1925 and it took just three years to complete the 531ft and 7,112-tonne steel and granite structure between Newcastle and Gateshead. It was designed by Mott, Hay and Anderson, and was built by Dorman Long and Co of Middlesbrough.

A number of buildings were demolished to make way for the giant crossing, including the Goat Inn, the Earl of Durham, the Ridley Arms, the Steamboat Inn, Ray’s lodging house, a powder mill, a pickle factory and a bank.

The structure was built like a ship, using shipbuilding techniques with rivets and panels which were welded together. The job began with the sinking of caissons - watertight chambers - 84ft long and 28ft wide into solid rock on either side of the river. These were reinforced with 10,400 tons of concrete. A derrick crane with a special jib 115ft long picked up sections of steelwork for the bridge from railway wagons on the riverside. Abutments of grey Cornish granite, 100ft wide, were also built with passenger lifts. Their intended use was as warehouses.

Nathaniel Collins, 33, a scaffolder from South Shields, lost his life after he fell from the crossing. He had been working near the top of the bridge which, at that time, was at least 175ft above the river. The arches weren’t more than a few feet apart.Poignantly, the following Saturday, February 25, around midday, the arches were finally joined amid great cheers.

Read more and see video @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ences-12636060
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