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Old February 5th, 2008, 09:07 AM   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BARAKALDO View Post
I have moved from Bilbao to Dublin one month ago. Dublin has been a little deception for me. I expected more from this city. I am not chauvinist, but Bilbao, not a country capital city, is much more modern than Dublin. Bilbao has two metro lines (in some months the new 3 line works are starting and other 2 new lines are under sutdy) while Dulbin, the capital of the Republic of Ireland has the worst public transport system I have ever seen and experienced. How can this be possible in this city where its population pays so many taxes. One of the most expensive to live cities in the world, Dublin, has the worst roads, urban design and public transport system. I cannot understand it.
Agree with a lot of what you say, but Ireland is a very low taxing country. Also, you live in Blanchardstown...suburbia sux the world over.
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Old February 5th, 2008, 09:10 AM   #62
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Article in the independent online about council and heights. It mentions 12 buildings in the pipeline that will be 50m+

http://www.independent.ie/national-n...t-1280711.html
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Old February 8th, 2008, 02:50 PM   #63
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T2 Dublin Airport U/C. Completion 2009. Big images!














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Old February 8th, 2008, 03:32 PM   #64
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Proposed new Aer Lingus HQ @ Dublin Airport














Incorproating 162,000 sq. m. development with 3,850 car parking spaces, comprising retail, offices and hotels. Currently at design stage. Valued at approx. €500 million.

Note the final image incorporates the proposed Metro with a new underground station.
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Old February 8th, 2008, 04:47 PM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BARAKALDO View Post
I have moved from Bilbao to Dublin one month ago. Dublin has been a little deception for me. I expected more from this city. I am not chauvinist, but Bilbao, not a country capital city, is much more modern than Dublin. Bilbao has two metro lines (in some months the new 3 line works are starting and other 2 new lines are under sutdy) while Dulbin, the capital of the Republic of Ireland has the worst public transport system I have ever seen and experienced. How can this be possible in this city where its population pays so many taxes. One of the most expensive to live cities in the world, Dublin, has the worst roads, urban design and public transport system. I cannot understand it.
The thing about the Republic is that its public services have yet to catch up with its booming economy.

Barely 15 years ago, the Republic was in the economic doldrums, 10 years ago the economy began to boom.

So, only in the last 7-8 years has dublin had the revenues to even begin to think about spending on public infrastructure works.

In time, Dublin and many other Irish Republic towns and cities will be up to the best Europe has to offer.

Of course, thats of little comfort to those like you, that have to suffer in the mean time.
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Old February 8th, 2008, 05:58 PM   #66
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More anti-high rise rhetoric posted in a leading Irish broadsheet,demonstrates how many planned high rises an taisce have managed to stop.Reckon we should just concentrate on docklands for future development cause its just pointless lookin elsewhere. Labels 4/5/6/ storey buildings as high rise lol.




High-rise obsession must be resisted

Dublin planners seem ready to allow high-rise anywhere, contrary to their own policy, writes Michael Smith .

More than a decade ago An Taisce - a charity - announced that it would appeal all unplanned high-rise in Dublin City. From Georges Quay to Spencer Dock to Ballsbridge to Smithfield it has been mostly successful in these Bord Pleanála appeals.

High-rise has, since 2000, been planned only for Docklands and around Heuston. Outside of these areas An Taisce has taken a stringent stance and on at least 20 occasions got Dublin City Council decisions overturned - for breaching its own development plan. The pressure for high-rise has been unrelenting for all that time, even though communities do not want it.

However, some city council officials appear to think otherwise and seem happy to press on with high-rise. For years senior management would overrule the city's chief professional planner, Pat McDonnell, who took a sceptical stance on high-rise. Since Pat McDonnell retired and was replaced by Dick Gleeson, senior management don't even have to overrule planners, as those in favour of high-rise are in the ascendant in the planning department, too.

City council management and planners are unduly deferential to developers, and do not seem to appreciate that human scale is a big part of the city centre's international appeal and bolsters our fragile sense of community.

Dublin City Council has granted permission for 10 tall buildings in the last two years. An Taisce, often alone, made submissions to An Bord Pleanála which, for example, overturned permissions for a 16-storey development on the north side of Thomas Street, a 13-storey apartment block at the Tivoli Theatre, a 12-storey residential scheme at School Street and a 13-storey building at Bridgefoot Street.

An Taisce is currently involved in other Bord Pleanála appeals including the Arnotts redevelopment which involves a 16-storey element, a 13-storey development on Merrion Road, and the proposed demolition of most of the Clarence Hotel. The city council is also encouraging a Liberty Hall-height sky-borne ski-slope structure at the Carlton site on O'Connell Street.

Inevitably these applications are dressed up in property supplement-speak as "crystalline", "sculptural", "breathtaking" and as heralding Ireland's arrival in the big time. The reality - as we know from O'Connell Bridge House, Liberty Hall, Georges Quay etc, as well as from much of England, is that there can be few urban aesthetics as depressing as an unplanned, incoherent skyline.

Whose interest does senior management at the council think it serves? Developers perceive that the council is a pushover. This is why Treasury Holdings want their 35-storey hotel to the rear of the Convention Centre to be considered by the city council and not the Docklands Authority (which has actually objected to the council over the scheme).

That is why Manor Park Homes are chancing their arm with first a 51-storey application for Thomas Street and now, after rebuff, a 32-storey version. That is why Seán Dunne's company is trying to get the council to agree area plans that allow high-rise in Ballsbridge - he knows that without them An Bord Pleanála will overturn any speculative permissions the council may grant him. But city councillors are not giving their management a free rein. In a major blow to Seán Dunne, among many other developers, they rejected management's recent plans to allow height "flexibility", even in areas where high-rise was not supposed to be allowed.

Dublin city is probably the only local authority in the State where the elected representatives have a more solid view of good planning than officials. It is evident that councillors are increasingly unhappy with the advice from management.

Under pressure from their communities we expect councillors to reject the charter for widespread high-rise that management has recently presented - Maximising the City's Potential: A Strategy for Intensification and Height .

No European capital has successfully superseded an intact low-rise historic core by high-rise. So why in 2008 is Dublin trying to? Our models should be Paris, Rome and Helsinki, which have continued to thrive without succumbing to the extreme hypertrophy characteristic in American urbanism. Strict specific limitations on height must be established. We should not repeat the mistakes of London or Belfast, borrowing a pretend modern model which was developed at the turn of the last century in the US.

We should all be able to agree on height. Dense development tends to serve the common good and the environment by allowing provision of an intensity of amenities and public transport. This is why An Taisce has opposed a lot of one-off housing in the countryside.

All things being equal (which they often are not) high can be good. But it must not interfere with the historic integrity of the city or diminish the amenities for locals. It is also true that high-rise structures are seldom energy-efficient and that the vague prospect of high-rise contributes to speculation and associated dereliction. And of course high-density development need not be high-rise. The Georgian Fitzwilliam area is very high density.

In Dublin city much can be achieved through high-density rather than high-rise. For example, we know that there are 350 hectares of Z6- and Z7-zoned land in the outer city (Naas Rd/Park West, Dublin Industrial Estate, Coolock Industrial Estate, etc) near public transport corridors, which could be developed to high densities.

That, combined with a possible 250 hectares in the port area would allow for the provision of up to 120,000 dwelling units in very high-density developments at 4/5/6-storey heights, with 200 units per hectare. This suggests that mere demographics and economics do not require the city council's indulgence of high rise.

So, where is high-rise desirable? The answer is we do not know. All we have is a confusing, incomplete and preliminary 2000 study, by DEGW, understood to be a firm of UK planning consultants. Outside Dublin city, it is possible that, if green fields have to be rezoned, consideration should be given to high-rise where there is excellent public transport. Much soulless suburbia could actually be improved by attractive high-rise.

An Taisce favours plan-led high-rise in suitable parts of Docklands, particularly, subject to improved accessibility, on the Poolbeg Peninsula where they could serve as portals to the city; and on specific sites near Heuston.

There may be other possibilities: Ballymun can absorb some high-quality high-rise. Perhaps some of the commercial/industrial areas in Walkinstown, the Naas Road, parts of Crumlin and parts of Finglas might derive some architectural interest from height punctuation.

These suggestions are not definitive because they are not rooted in proper research and proper local consultation. And of course, even if the site is right for high-rise, it may not be suitable for ultra-high-rise - each planning application should be subjected to a rigorous assessment. It is crucial, too, that once particular areas have been deemed suitable, there should be a rigid commitment not to build high-rise - unplanned - anywhere else.

We do not know where high-rise may be desirable since the proper study has never been done of the capacity of areas to accept high-rise. National and European law requires a strategic environmental assessment to be carried out on the effect of its proposals. This has not been done. An Taisce in Dublin city is looking for residents' groups to join it in its opposition to unplanned high-rise: [email protected]

Maximising the City's Potential: A Strategy for Intensification and Height , will be on display in the Civic Offices at Wood Quay until March 7th.

Last edited by cubix; February 8th, 2008 at 07:34 PM.
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Old February 9th, 2008, 02:05 PM   #67
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I'd say some of those nimbys are probably right. We were promised a landmark building and look at what we got:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...=305784&page=3

The most effective way of reducing sprawl isn't by building loads of tall buildings (although there's nothing wrong with them if they are good), but by changing the mindset of the people so that raising a child in an apartment is fine (just like everywhere in Europe).
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Old February 13th, 2008, 12:31 PM   #68
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Some news on the metro.

Quote:
Metro stations get the green light in fast-track decision

By Treacy Hogan and Paul Melia
Wednesday February 13 2008


WORK on the Metro from Dublin city centre to the airport is to start even though a builder has not been picked.


Transport Minister Noel Dempsey yesterday got Cabinet approval for Exchequer funding to be used to fast-track construction of stations at the new Mater Hospital and at Terminal 2 in Dublin Airport.

The RPA will now go ahead and build the station boxes at the Mater and Dublin Airport.

If they waited for the successful bidder to build these stations it would cause significant disruption at both the Mater and the airport as construction on the new hospital and new terminal would be already under way.

By giving the green light to the RPA now to get construction under way they minimise disruption at both locations.

Later this week the RPA will invite the four international consortia that have pre-qualified to tender for the Metro North project to engage in a technical workshop in advance of inviting them to formally bid for the project.

It is understood that the Rail Procurement Agency (RPA) will have to delay lodging its Railway Order Application to An Bord Pleanala by up to three months because the design for Metro North is not sufficiently detailed for the purposes of a planning application.

The RPA has planned to lodge the application to the Board early this year under new legislation which allows for the "fast tracking" of strategic infrastructure projects, but it could be the summer before the design is complete.

Completion

This could result in a delay in Metro coming on stream. Construction work was due to be completed by 2012, but informed sources have said it is likely to be 2013 before work is finished.

However, yesterday Mr Dempsey secured Government approval for the RPA to begin enabling works on the construction of the station sites at the new Mater Hospital and Terminal 2 in Dublin Airport.

The Government has now agreed the financing structure of the project so that the RPA can proceed with the bidding process.

The Metro will be the largest infrastructure project currently under way in Europe and Mr Dempsey said he was pushing to get it delivered as quickly as possible.

Mr Dempsey said the Metro was vital as a cost-effective public transport alternative to get people out of their cars.

"We can't let cars continue to pour onto our streets. It's unsustainable, it's causing traffic gridlock, costing the economy millions and people precious time," he added.

The proposed route for Metro North would serve areas where the population is expected to double in the next 20 years.
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Old February 19th, 2008, 02:16 PM   #69
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Quote:
THE country's most exclusive suburb is to become home to a 15-storey building after planning permission was granted for a €600m development in the capital yesterday.


Despite dozens of objections from the well-heeled, Dublin City Council has given developer Ray Grehan permission to build his ambitious Number One Ballsbridge project on the site of UCD's former Veterinary School.

Mr Grehan, whose company Glenkerrin bought the 2.2-acre site for a record €83m an acre in early 2006, plans to build 109 exclusive apartments, offices and shops on a site in the heart of Dublin 4 which is beside another controversial proposal -- Sean Dunne's 132-metre skyscraper on the Jury's Hotel and Berkeley Court site.



Last night, Mr Grehan said he was very happy with the council's decision, but added he expected it to be appealed to An Bord Pleanala.

"We're happy, it's the first phase but I'd imagine the board will have the ultimate say," he said. "I would have thought we weren't too controversial, but at the end of the day I'm very happy to get the permission."

And he said he might delay construction works until Mr Dunne's more controversial application is approved -- but added that builders were ready to move in if required.

He refused to be drawn on how much apartments were likely to cost, saying it would depend on market conditions.

However, they would not be aimed at the lower end of the market, and he said Ballsbridge might not be as affected by a slowdown in the property market as other parts of the city.

The proposal also includes two public squares to be named New Shelbourne Plaza and New Pembroke Square.

The city council granted permission subject to 21 conditions, but none would delay the project. Mr Grehan will have to pay €4.4m in levies to the council to provide water, sewerage and other infrastructure.

Architects HKR said it was an "exciting and challenging project" which was a "unique opportunity" to develop a landmark site.

"During the design process, careful consideration was given to the concerns previously expressed by residents in the area and the granting of planning permission is testament to the success of this process," design director David King Smith said. "Our successful proposal will not only have minimal visual impact but will also integrate with the character and design of the surrounding buildings and Ballsbridge area."

However, not every one will be happy with the decision. More than 80 objections were received by the city council, including one from An Taisce, which said the application was premature as a local area plan -- which would outline how Ballsbridge should develop -- was being drafted.

Heritage officer Ian Lumley said the group would not be commenting until it had seen the planning conditions. However, an appeal from one of the many objectors is likely.

Artists impression

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Old February 25th, 2008, 03:53 PM   #70
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Heres a 3D video of the Jury's Berkley Court development, it looks briliant but of course will be shot down, because its in Ballsbridge (or just in Ireland in general, )

http://www.vimeo.com/663195/
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Old March 12th, 2008, 06:19 PM   #71
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The Sunday Business Post

The Dublin Docklands Development Authority (DDDA) looks set to go ahead with a major infill and high-rise scheme called Liffey Island in the North Lotts area. The land is then likely to be developed to include 15 to 17 tall buildings of more than 12 storeys, including ground floor shops, four to five storeys of offices overhead and residential units on top of that. The development would straddle North Wall Quay between the East Link Bridge and the Santiago Calatrava bridge, which is running years behind schedule. It would include towers being built on stilts in the Liffey, something that is likely to draw widespread opposition, given the tradition of quays in Dublin having buildings set back from the quay front with a roadway and footpaths between them and the river. It is generally accepted that the design of the north docklands in particular was too low, creating a repetitive and boring skyline. Plans by the DDDA such as The Watchtower at The Point Village, the U2 Tower and the Anthony Gormley sculpture planned for the Liffey are designed to address that.



So they seem pretty serious about this,is anyone aware of similar schemes around the world,building high rise on stilts cause they realise the vast amount of whats been built over the years is boring and repetitive.
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Old March 14th, 2008, 03:35 PM   #72
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i saw some renders of this awhile back on archiseek. they looked VERY interesting if i remember correctly. lots of crazy ass shaped buildings. i like alot
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Old March 15th, 2008, 12:10 AM   #73
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Renders?I certainly haven't seen any of those.Wil have a look..

Last edited by zodiac85; March 15th, 2008 at 12:16 AM.
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Old March 28th, 2008, 06:23 PM   #74
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Elm Park is a development that is nearing completion just south of Dublin 4












I do like this development. It looks really good. Like the use of timber.





image hosted on flickr



image hosted on flickr








Nice
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Old April 9th, 2008, 11:48 AM   #75
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Plans for a new "Northern Quarter" on the site of Arnotts department store in Dublin will have to go back to the drawing board following the rejection by An Bord Pleanála of several major elements of the development, including a 16-storey tower. The board has told Arnotts that the plans could not proceed in their current form and has directed them to reduce the height of the tower by nine storeys and ensure that no other building in the development was higher than seven. In its letter to Arnotts, the board said the development would be "unduly obtrusive on the skyline" and would "seriously detract from the balance and architectural coherence of these streets". The wording of the board's letter is a powerful signal that it will not allow any high-rise buildings in the historic core of the city. While it is sure to come as a major blow to Arnotts who had its plans passed almost in full by Dublin City Council last year, it also sets a marker for future developments in the area, including the redevelopment of the Carlton site a short distance north of Arnotts.
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Old April 9th, 2008, 06:40 PM   #76
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Thanks Cubix - thought they would not get away with it as envisaged.


Dont have the link to the full article but some info on the 'Liffey Island' scheme.

Quote:
The Sunday Business Post

A covered arcade along part of the Liffey with shops and cafes is being planned by the Dublin Docklands Development Authority. Details of the project were unveiled last week as the authority outlined further details of its Liffey Island plan for the north docklands at a meeting of the North Lotts’ Residents Association. The authority also said that the land between Spencer Dock and Point Village will have significantly higher development than allowed for under the 2003 masterplan. The new masterplan will allow buildings of up to 25 storeys, but most of them will be between 14 and 15 storeys. Those attending the meeting were vetted and this reporter was asked to leave. However, details of the plans were subsequently posted on architectural discussion forum archiseek.com.
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Old April 15th, 2008, 08:49 PM   #77
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theres a pic of the model of the liffey island over on archiseek; just to give people an idea of the scaling
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Old April 23rd, 2008, 01:06 PM   #78
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Quote:
1.25bn plan by developers for O'Connell St
Monday, 21 April 2008 22:02
A planning application for a €1.25bn development of Upper O'Connell Street and surrounding areas in central Dublin is to be lodged later this week.

Chartered Land, which is behind Dundrum Shopping centre, says the development would bring 3,000 jobs when completed and up to 7,000 jobs during construction.

The plans cover a 5.5-acre area known as Dublin Central which stretches from O'Connell Street to Moore Street and from Henry Street to Parnell Street.

AdvertisementThe proposals include a mixture of residential and retail development, along with three new public squares and two pedestrian streets. There will also be a rooftop restaurant quarter.

The facade of the Carlton cinema will also be retained but it will be relocated 50m north of its present location to make way for a new square. The cinema has been closed for the last 14 years due to multiple and protracted legal wrangles.

The centrepiece of the development will be a 12-storey building with a sloping public park on its roof. The park, which will cover more than an acre, will be accessed by cable car.

However the height of the building could be problematic.

An Bord Pleanála recently wrote to Arnotts advising it to reduce the height of its proposed 16-storey tower nearby by nine storeys as the board believed it 'distracted from the balance and architectural structure of the streets'.

A number of listed and protected buildings are located within the area and the developers say they will preserve a number of houses including number 16 Moore Street - the last headquarters of the leaders of the 1916 Rising.

An undertaking has also been given to maintain Moore Street market
Article and video on this link

http://www.rte.ie/news/2008/0421/carlton.html
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Old April 23rd, 2008, 03:42 PM   #79
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I know Moore Street is a bit of a dump but it has so much character (Moore St is where the market is am i right?), i hope this new plan won't ruin that. The sloping public park on the roof looks amazing but i fear that the proposals will be to high for the council. If this all gets the go ahead though O'Connell St is going to be one big building site for years, with the Metro Station and Tunnells, Arnotts site and this.. lol.. and just after they finished doing the street redesign. It needs to happen though, O'Connell St has so much potential.
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Old April 23rd, 2008, 04:57 PM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hcrosskey View Post
I know Moore Street is a bit of a dump but it has so much character (Moore St is where the market is am i right?), i hope this new plan won't ruin that. The sloping public park on the roof looks amazing but i fear that the proposals will be to high for the council. If this all gets the go ahead though O'Connell St is going to be one big building site for years, with the Metro Station and Tunnells, Arnotts site and this.. lol.. and just after they finished doing the street redesign. It needs to happen though, O'Connell St has so much potential.


Some of its potential is already there. The Northern end of the street needs work. Funny thing is - to me O'Connell St has always been a construction site! In fact you could probrably go all the way back to when Nelson was blown up in the 60's - since then something has always been constructed on the street. In the 90's it was always being dug up for something 'new' - only a few years ago you had the luas and reconstruction of the street at the same time. Now it seems the entire street will be turned into a building site. The metro will require a massive trench towards the south end of the street (I dont know whether even the needle will have to be taken down to accomodate that), the two luas lines have to be connected and sites developed. Thankfully the interconnector will be on the southside (btw that means you can rule out St Stephens Green aswell)
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