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Old January 15th, 2017, 09:37 PM   #141
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Quote:
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The same organisation (Perth Zoo) that has let multiple introduced fauna species loose to become pests, is in charge of this project, so. One of which is a parrot that steals the nests and food of a local Threatened cockatoo species.
I hardly think elephants and rhinos could get loose and become pests. Not the same thing as birds or rodents.
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Old January 16th, 2017, 05:57 AM   #142
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You mean like horses, camels, goats, buffalo and donkeys? These are all naturalised in Aus.
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Old January 16th, 2017, 03:45 PM   #143
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^
Yeah, something like that, writ large, is kinda what I had in mind. You'd have to find a very large piece of privately-owned land (I'm thinking something about the size of Kruger National Park) in an area like, say, this in the Northern Territory, which looks about as close to Africa as you can get (without actually being in Africa) would do the trick. You'd have to really fence it off and manage it intensively, but from the standpoint of the elephants and rhinos and whatever else you put there, they'd never know they weren't in Africa anymore.

I can even imagine parts of south Texas being suitable for something like that. Large parts of it look like this and, while getting colder than most places in Africa (except maybe parts of South Africa), it would probably be good-enough, though I think you'd have a hard time finding a super-sized parcel of land.
Why would you even consider this though since the populations of these threatened animals in large well protected African reserves like Etosha, Chobe, Moremi, Central Kalahari, Kgalagadi, Kruger are all stable or increasing. Kruger has a massive Elephant over population problem and even with the ongoing war against international syndicates poaching our Rhino from Mozambique the population of Rhino in Kruger is still stable or increasing.
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Old January 16th, 2017, 05:49 PM   #144
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Just rhinos.
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Old January 17th, 2017, 03:24 AM   #145
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It's just easier for governments to look like they're doing their bit for conservation, by having captive breeding programmes for animals from other countries. It's much harder to actually do something in your own country, because conservation v. economy.
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Old January 17th, 2017, 03:30 AM   #146
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And they're high profile animals as well. I sometimes think that the general public don't realise just how many species there are out there. There are like a golden dozen that everyone talks about and responds to. Which politicians tap into, rather than really looking into it and making 'courageous' decisions.
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Old January 17th, 2017, 07:19 PM   #147
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You mean like horses, camels, goats, buffalo and donkeys? These are all naturalised in Aus.
That's only because nobody ever tried to contain them. Those are domesticated animals which are widely owned and thus can easily escape to the wild because all those owners are difficult to control. If you had a single entity controlling what would basically be a large zoo, complete with fence, and containing animals which are very rarely, if ever, domesticated, that would be much easier to control.

Anyway, my plan is probably never going to happen so this discussion is all academic.
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Old January 17th, 2017, 07:23 PM   #148
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Why would you even consider this though since the populations of these threatened animals in large well protected African reserves like Etosha, Chobe, Moremi, Central Kalahari, Kgalagadi, Kruger are all stable or increasing. Kruger has a massive Elephant over population problem and even with the ongoing war against international syndicates poaching our Rhino from Mozambique the population of Rhino in Kruger is still stable or increasing.
If there are over-populations of some species in some areas, then perhaps the need to create non-African reserves for those species might be less. I was just going by the overall trends for those species in the articles myself and others have linked.
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Old January 18th, 2017, 05:55 AM   #149
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A wild Malayan tiger spotted by a motorist resting next to LPT2 highway a few days ago in Terengganu, Malaysia's east coast.
There are as few as 250 wild Malayan tigers left, making it the rarest subspecies of tiger. Conservation efforts are being helmed by Malaysian and US zoos.



A week after the critically endangered Malayan tiger spotted and went viral, an endangered Malayan tapir was found roaming next to the same highway.




Rapid expansion of Malaysian infrastructure has caused further fragmentation of habitat, and with roads, plantations creep in. Last year a pregnant tigress was hit by a car in this same stretch of motorway. Autopsy revealed that she was bearing 2 very precious cubs.

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Old January 18th, 2017, 06:44 PM   #150
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RIP the kitty cat and her two unborn cubs.
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Old March 29th, 2017, 12:35 AM   #151
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Meow.

Photos of new tiger cubs in Thailand reveal a 'miraculous' comeback for the species
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Conservationists on Tuesday hailed the discovery of a new breeding population of tigers in Thailand as a "miraculous" victory for a sub-species nearly wiped out by poaching.

Images of some tigers including six cubs, captured by camera traps in an eastern Thai jungle throughout 2016, confirm the presence of what is only the world's second known breeding population of the endangered Indochinese tiger.

The only other growing population -- the largest in the world with about three dozen tigers -- is based in a western forest corridor in Thailand near the border with Myanmar.

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Old April 12th, 2017, 06:01 AM   #152
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Pleistocene Park in north-east Siberia had a Kickstarter going to raise funds to buy and transport bison and yak to the park.
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects...em-to-save-the
Quote:
The specific scope of this campaign is to bring herds of bison and yaks to Pleistocene Park in the spring and summer of 2017. We will buy several American plains bison from a little reserve near the city of Perm, in the central part of Russia. Yaks will be bought in the republic of Tuva, on the border with Mongolia in southern Siberia. Using heavy duty trucks we will drive animals to one of the farthest parts of Siberia reachable by road, the village of Seimchan, 500 km west of Magadan. This distance is similar to driving round trip from San Francisco to New York. In Seimchan we will load animals on the first barge to navigate the Kolyma River after the winter ice recedes. After a few days on the river we will arrive in Pleistocene Park near the town of Cherskii, close to the point where the Kolyma empties into the Arctic Ocean.

How will the Kickstarter money be spent?

Our goal is to raise 106,000 dollars. This is the minimum we need to:

Purchase animals;
Purchase and preparation of containers for animal transport;
Rent 2 big trucks for transportation to Seimchan;
River ship transportation fee from Seimchan to Cherskii;
Small barge rental for 40km transportation from the port in Cherskii to the Pleistocene Park pier.
Purchasing food for the animals for the duration of the trip;
Miscellaneous trip expenses, including 2-3 people travelling with the animals,
Expense of manufacturing and delivery of Kickstarter rewards
Taxes, bank and legal fees
They made it! They raised 110 000 USD
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Old May 6th, 2017, 10:44 AM   #153
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Rare Russian tiger returns to the wild

03 May

Amur tigers were nearly driven to extinction, but conservation work in Russia is helping them bouncing back slowly.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-3...ns-to-the-wild
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Old May 19th, 2017, 08:47 PM   #154
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Arctic stronghold of world’s seeds flooded after permafrost melts

Friday 19 May 2017 16.39 BST

It was designed as an impregnable deep-freeze to protect the world’s most precious seeds from any global disaster and ensure humanity’s food supply forever. But the Global Seed Vault, buried in a mountain deep inside the Arctic circle, has been breached after global warming produced extraordinary temperatures over the winter, sending meltwater gushing into the entrance tunnel.

The vault is on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen and contains almost a million packets of seeds, each a variety of an important food crop. When it was opened in 2008, the deep permafrost through which the vault was sunk was expected to provide “failsafe” protection against “the challenge of natural or man-made disasters”.

But soaring temperatures in the Arctic at the end of the world’s hottest ever recorded year led to melting and heavy rain, when light snow should have been falling. “It was not in our plans to think that the permafrost would not be there and that it would experience extreme weather like that,” said Hege Njaa Aschim, from the Norwegian government, which owns the vault.

https://www.theguardian.com/environm...rmafrost-melts


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Old June 3rd, 2017, 09:45 AM   #155
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Old July 10th, 2017, 09:07 PM   #156
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Old July 12th, 2017, 09:02 AM   #157
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Lynx could return to Britain this year after absence of 1,300 years

Friday 7 July 2017 15.39 BST

After an absence of 1,300 years, the lynx could be back in UK forests by the end of 2017. The Lynx UK Trust has announced it will apply for a trial reintroduction for six lynx into the Kielder forest, Northumberland, following a two-year consultation process with local stakeholders.

The secretive cat can grow to 1.5m in length and feeds almost exclusively by ambushing deer. Attacks on humans are unknown, but it was hunted to extinction for its fur in the UK. The Kielder forest was chosen by the trust from five possible sites, due to its abundance of deer, large forest area and the absence of major roads.

Sheep farmers and some locals are opposed to the reintroduction, but Dr Paul O’Donoghue, chief scientific advisor to the Lynx UK Trust and expert adviser to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) believes there are good reasons for reintroducing the predator.

https://www.theguardian.com/environm...-of-1300-years
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Old July 15th, 2017, 09:17 AM   #158
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World's large carnivores being pushed off the map

Six of the world's large carnivores have lost more than 90% of their historic range, according to a study.

The Ethiopian wolf, red wolf, tiger, lion, African wild dog and cheetah have all been squeezed out as land is lost to human settlements and farming.

Reintroduction of carnivores into areas where they once roamed is vital in conservation, say scientists.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-40596729
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Old July 23rd, 2017, 02:37 PM   #159
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Reintroduction of lions to Rwanda's Akagera National Park

Amidst the gloom and doom, a bit of good news about lions. This video documents the reintroduction of lions into Rwanda in 2015.
Lions have disappeared in that country since the genocide years.



Another clip from mainstream media.



New cubs born in 2016.

Quote:
Three lion cubs were born in a wildlife park in Rwanda, boosting efforts to restore the country’s lion population, which was wiped out following the country’s 1994 genocide.

African Parks, a Johannesburg-based group that manages Akagera National Park in Rwanda, said the mother is 11-year-old Shema, one of seven lions transported from South Africa to Rwanda, as we reported last year. Their father, Ntwari, is five years old, one of two males in the group from South Africa.

“It’s news that we have been waiting for,” Sarah Hall, Akagera’s tourism and marketing manager, said Friday.
http://thewildlife.wbur.org/2016/05/...ration-effort/
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Old July 23rd, 2017, 10:04 PM   #160
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We need to reintroduce lions and other big cats in Europe. Lions, leopards, and others roamed all over southern Europe up until Roman times, and all over in prehistory. In fact most of the big cats killed for Roman entertainment were native and it's probably what led to their extinction. So what do you think Europeans? Are you ready for wild lions in your forests?
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