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Old July 13th, 2014, 05:22 PM   #81
Terick
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El museo se ve interesante. El que pueda visite y traiga fotos.
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Old July 13th, 2014, 11:37 PM   #82
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You can't seriously expect someone from say, Bokoshe, Oklahoma know anything about Puerto Rico can you? That would be like expecting someone from Las Marias know anything about Sterling, North Dakota. Most of the population of the world have never heard of Puerto Rico. It's just a fact.

That being said, I too was born and raised on the mainland. I learned Spanish because I wanted to. Not because I was taught, or forced. I wanted to. Why? Because it is part of my ethnicity. It has nothing to do where I am.

The sprinkling of signs in English around the island is not going to bring about the downfall of local culture. It enriches it. Just observe the younger generations on the island, regardless of their political affiliations. They seem to be very comfortable with mainland culture and lingo.

The Puerto Rico of the 1980's or any other decade, doesn't exist anymore. It will never come back. Culture, like language, is a living thing. It is not static. It evolves.

Only you, can keep alive what is culturally important. Regardless of what a sign says, what the locals may know or what language they speak.

Being Puertorican is in the heart.
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Old July 15th, 2014, 04:55 AM   #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultramatic View Post
You can't seriously expect someone from say, Bokoshe, Oklahoma know anything about Puerto Rico can you? That would be like expecting someone from Las Marias know anything about Sterling, North Dakota. Most of the population of the world have never heard of Puerto Rico. It's just a fact.

That being said, I too was born and raised on the mainland. I learned Spanish because I wanted to. Not because I was taught, or forced. I wanted to. Why? Because it is part of my ethnicity. It has nothing to do where I am.

The sprinkling of signs in English around the island is not going to bring about the downfall of local culture. It enriches it. Just observe the younger generations on the island, regardless of their political affiliations. They seem to be very comfortable with mainland culture and lingo.

The Puerto Rico of the 1980's or any other decade, doesn't exist anymore. It will never come back. Culture, like language, is a living thing. It is not static. It evolves.

Only you, can keep alive what is culturally important. Regardless of what a sign says, what the locals may know or what language they speak.

Being Puertorican is in the heart.
Ultramatic- I could not have said it better! I too was born and raised on the mainland and my wife and children were also born on the mainland. We were raised at my home with English and Spanish being equal. My parents were born and raised in Puerto Rico, yet they dominated the English language very well and never had any trouble when they moved to the mainland. They taught us the importance of our culture, and I am teaching my kids the same thing. We live in the beautiful town of Ciales and five of our neighbors are also bilingual families. The Puerto Rican culture has always been evolving and will continue to do so regardless of whether they put English signs or not. If you drive around the island a good portion of the business signs that you see are in English or hasn't anybody taken noticed of that? Being able to dominate two languages regardless if they are English and Spanish is actually beneficial. That said, the museum is very nice and if they take the English sign and replace it with Spanish or put the sign in both languages it will still be a nice museum. Let's enjoy it people.
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Old October 10th, 2014, 10:04 PM   #84
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