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Old February 3rd, 2016, 03:17 PM   #2941
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skopje/Скопје View Post
The police headquarters in Hague, The Netherlands (1981). I really like this one.
Me too! Probably a little late in the game for Brutalism, and it's more of a brutalist-postmodernist hybrid, but I dig it!
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Old February 4th, 2016, 02:50 PM   #2942
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Philips computing center in Eindhoven, The Netherlands









photos by Klaas Vermaas
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Old February 7th, 2016, 12:01 PM   #2943
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Wah Luck House, Washington, DC, USA

S8129: Wah Luck House by Corey'sWorld (MDCoreBear), on Flickr
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Old February 7th, 2016, 04:36 PM   #2944
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Philips computing center in Eindhoven, The Netherlands


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It's not a style I like, but it does show the huge difference keeping such buildings looking clean makes.

Modern buildings all too often age really badly, and very quickly, and need to retain that "fresh out of the packet" look to retain elegance.
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Old February 8th, 2016, 03:04 PM   #2945
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Interesting article, one of the many recently...

Quote:
What cities of the future can learn from brutalism

4th February 2016

By Christopher Beanland

The conventional wisdom goes that, for its all fury and fanfare, brutalism was a mere speck in architectural history; a 20-year experiment from 1955 to 1975 that produced some interesting outcomes and some downright weird cityscapes. Modernism is over, our faith in the future is damaged, and architecture today should just respond to what's already there rather than creating brave new worlds built from great cliffs of exposed concrete and multiple, vertiginous levels.

But hold on a second. Last month, Alejandro Aravena won the Pritzker Prize – architecture's highest honour. He's also curating this summer's Venice Architecture Biennale. The Chilean's designs for the Santiago studio Elemental are completely neobrutalist: huge Jenga blocks stacked on one another like at UC Santiago and the Novartis Healthcare building in Shanghai. He also designs social housing, which was a cornerstone of brutalism.

Talking of that social housing, blocks around Britain like Balfron Tower and Keeling House in London, and Park Hill in Sheffield have been remade into slick yuppie housing – their concrete boldness is fetishised and desired. Hotels are opening in former brutalist buildings like Camden's Town Hall Annexe in King's Cross and the Mivtachim Sanatorium in Israel. The style has many fans among the design cognoscenti.

Cities of the future would do well to learn from brutalism. And before today's mayors and planners spit out their coffee in astonishment, here's why: brutalism, simply, is nowhere near as bad as it's been painted.

For fairness, let's get the mistake out of the way first. Brutalist buildings paid far too much heed to cars. Their rigid segregation of people and cars and their shameless kowtowing before the internal combustion engine made spaces that weren't friendly for pedestrians and underpasses which no one liked being in. This was a major failing, but it was understandable because architects sought to protect people from traffic – and at the time this separation of flesh and metal was received wisdom.

Yet we have much to learn from brutalism elsewhere. Today's cities are filled with buildings that retreat, that cough and splutter. Brutalist buildings asserted themselves and looked right. They were tough and iconic without even trying. They were also architecture as pure art – sculptural and abstract forms that tested the viewer. We need more of that.

Today's 'iconic' buildings are kitschy, show-off pieces that look crap after a few years: take Sheffield's former Pop Music Museum or Lyon's Musée des Confluences. For every successful Tate Modern or Guggenheim Bilbao there are hundreds of crummy pretenders. Brutalist buildings look good after decades – and they can be remodelled into the perfect cultural space. Marcel Breuer's old Whitney Museum in New York is reborn this year as the Met Breuer – a perfect place to display art.

Brutalist buildings incorporated public space – lots of it. Cities today need public space more than ever. But financial pressures mean that ever more of the ground we stand on ends up getting built on. Brutalist buildings have given us incredible sweeps of non-corporate public space like Nathan Philips Square outside Toronto's City Hall, the Barbican's water gardens and the Southbank Centre in London where those unloved undercrofts are skater heaven. But on the roof of the Queen Elizabeth Hall is one of Central London's most gorgeous terraces, while the squares and terraces dotted around Denys Lasdun's UEA Campus in Norwich give life and energy to a university setting, letting students hang out and talk and eat their lunch.

Brutalist architects like Rodney Gordon and Erno Goldfinger thought about space in three dimensions. But today our tall buildings turn out bland and our shopping centres and airports blur into each other. Brutalist buildings made a play of many levels, of staircases and escalators, of building complexity and excitement. Cities of the future that could embrace that idea again would be much more exciting places to explore and live in.

Class was deliberately absent from brutalist buildings. The shiny towers we have today for the rich and the more prosaic buildings for the poor exemplify inequalities, as do 'poor doors' and anti-homeless spikes. Everyone was welcome in brutalist libraries, flats, estates, churches – before 'defensible space' and the individualistic era of the 1980s pissed on the dream. In tomorrow's cities these truly egalitarian spaces could mark out a city that really cared about all its residents.

Brutalist buildings looked to the future. They recognised that they were alien, sometimes scary, and not like what was already there. They were an investment in the city, showing great vision and optimism. Much of what has been built in cities in the last 10 years often looks like it's come straight back from the past – especially houses, many of which just pander to false notions of a cosy history.

What cities can really learn from brutalism is faith. Brutalism was an act of faith, a song to the city. It was rough and tough but so are cities – they're not the countryside. If we built like this again it would say that we love our cities and we see them as places that can be exciting, innovative, fair, prosperous and long-lasting.
http://thelongandshort.org/cities/wh...from-brutalism
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Old February 8th, 2016, 04:37 PM   #2946
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Rebberg House, Zurich, Switzerland (1960)
Architect:Hans Demarmels



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Old February 8th, 2016, 07:04 PM   #2947
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Posted here before, but worth a repost. After all, the architect won the Pritzker Prize.

UC Innovation Center, Santiago, Chile (2014)
Architect: Alejandro Aravena













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Old February 8th, 2016, 07:46 PM   #2948
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St. Mauritius Church, Wiesbaden, Germany (1968)
Architects: Jürgen Jüchser, Peter Ressel, Otto Herbert Hajek















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Old February 9th, 2016, 03:49 AM   #2949
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Terminal Neige, Flaine, France (1962)
Architect: Marcel Breuer







The resort has been renovated, I love the furniture.




















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Old February 9th, 2016, 04:09 AM   #2950
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Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, Kohala Coast, HI, USA (1965)
Architect: Robert Trent Jones Sr. (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill)


















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Last edited by ThatOneGuy; February 9th, 2016 at 05:25 AM.
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Old February 9th, 2016, 04:36 AM   #2951
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Reyes House, Mexico City, Mexico (2014)
Architects: Pedro Reyes, Carla Fernández



























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Old February 9th, 2016, 01:38 PM   #2952
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La Tulipe, Geneva, Switzerland (1975-76)












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Old February 9th, 2016, 05:53 PM   #2953
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Friedenskirche, Monheim am Rhein, Germany (1974)
Architect: Walter Förderer







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Old February 10th, 2016, 03:48 PM   #2954
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I think that we already had this building, but the photos were not that good:

Town Hall, Agadir, Morocco (1960's, architect: Le Corbusier)

Post-corbusian Agadir Town hall by Emile Duhon (1911-1983) by bcmng, on Flickr

Post-corbusian Agadir Town hall by Emile Duhon (1911-1983) by bcmng, on Flickr

Post-corbusian Agadir Town hall by Emile Duhon (1911-1983) by bcmng, on Flickr

Post-corbusian Agadir Town hall by Emile Duhon (1911-1983) by bcmng, on Flickr

Post-corbusian Agadir Town hall by Emile Duhon (1911-1983) by bcmng, on Flickr

Post-corbusian Agadir Town hall by Emile Duhon (1911-1983) by bcmng, on Flickr

Post-corbusian Agadir Town hall by Emile Duhon (1911-1983) by bcmng, on Flickr
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Old February 10th, 2016, 04:36 PM   #2955
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The caption says the architect is Emile Duhon

That would be a really crappy building for Corbusier
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Old February 10th, 2016, 06:49 PM   #2956
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I took the info from here minube.net
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Old February 10th, 2016, 08:05 PM   #2957
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As far as I know he never built anything in Africa, but some Africans took inspiration from him. That brise-soleil does look "Corbusian"
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Old February 11th, 2016, 12:29 PM   #2958
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That building is of Emile DUHON. Definitely not Le Corbusier.
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Old February 11th, 2016, 06:46 PM   #2959
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New Delhi, India

New Delhi, on Barakhambha Road by Ðariusz, on Flickr

New Delhi, on Barakhambha Road by Ðariusz, on Flickr

New Delhi, on Barakhambha Road by Ðariusz, on Flickr
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Old February 11th, 2016, 06:54 PM   #2960
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Cemetery Building, Erlenbach, Switzerland

IMG_6617 by trevor.patt, on Flickr

IMG_6637 by trevor.patt, on Flickr

IMG_6644 by trevor.patt, on Flickr

IMG_6616 by trevor.patt, on Flickr
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