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Old April 11th, 2007, 12:48 PM   #1
habagatcentral1
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Cebuano Literary Works and Linguistics

Discussions about the concept, the characteristics, the sentence, the vocabualry, the grammar and the evolution of Cebuano and Binisaya here in this thread and also learn words that seemed to have been buried due to fast Westernization of our languages in the Philippines.

So, post away na mga bai!

Quote:
Cebuano is spoken natively by the inhabitants of Cebu, Bohol, Negros Oriental and some parts of Leyte and the Samar islands and throughout Mindanao. It is also spoken in a few towns and islands in Samar. Until 1975, Cebuano surpassed Tagalog in terms of number of native speakers. Some dialects of Cebuano give different names to the language. Residents of Bohol may refer to Cebuano as Bol-anon while Cebuano-speakers in Leyte may call their dialect Kana. It is also spoken by Warays in Samar and Leyte, Eskaya in Bohol, and by native (like Atas, Bagobos, and Bukidnons), migrant Filipino ethnic groups (like Ilocanos and Ilonggos), and foreign ethnic groups (like Indonesians, Spanish, and Koreans) as second language. Cebuano is a language with Verb Subject Object sentence order. It uses prepositions rather than postpositions. Nouns come after adjectives, but before genitives or relative phrases.

Source: Wikipedia.com
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Old April 11th, 2007, 12:48 PM   #2
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Cebuano Language - Compiled Threads

Discussions about the concept, the characteristics, the sentence, the vocabualry, the grammar and the evolution of Cebuano and Binisaya here in this thread and also learn words that seemed to have been buried due to fast Westernization of our languages in the Philippines.

So, post away na mga bai!

Quote:
Cebuano is spoken natively by the inhabitants of Cebu, Bohol, Negros Oriental and some parts of Leyte and the Samar islands and throughout Mindanao. It is also spoken in a few towns and islands in Samar. Until 1975, Cebuano surpassed Tagalog in terms of number of native speakers. Some dialects of Cebuano give different names to the language. Residents of Bohol may refer to Cebuano as Bol-anon while Cebuano-speakers in Leyte may call their dialect Kana. It is also spoken by Warays in Samar and Leyte, Eskaya in Bohol, and by native (like Atas, Bagobos, and Bukidnons), migrant Filipino ethnic groups (like Ilocanos and Ilonggos), and foreign ethnic groups (like Indonesians, Spanish, and Koreans) as second language. Cebuano is a language with Verb Subject Object sentence order. It uses prepositions rather than postpositions. Nouns come after adjectives, but before genitives or relative phrases.

Source: Wikipedia.com
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:10 PM   #3
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Bernie,

Nice thread. Anyway, does anyone out there know how many Filipinos know how to speak and write Cebuano?
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:10 PM   #4
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Bernie,

Nice thread. Anyway, does anyone out there know how many Filipinos know how to speak and write Cebuano?
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:32 PM   #5
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Let's start the thread with the Cebuano version of the Philippine National Anthem

Nasudnong Awit (Cebuano version of the Philippine National Anthem, Lupang Hinirang)


Translated into Cebuano by Jess Vestil

Yutang tabunon
Mutya nga masilakon,
Putling bahandi,
Amo kang gimahal.
Mithing gisimba,
Yuta's mga bayani,
Sa manlulupig,
Pagadapigan ka.
Ang mga buntod mo,
Ug lapyahan sa langit mong bughaw,
Nagahulad sa awit, lamdag sa
Kaliwat tang gawas.
Silaw sa adlaw ug bituon
Sa nasudnong bandila,
Nagatima-an nga buhion ta
Ang atong pagka-usa.
Yutang maanyag, duyan ka sa pagmahal,
Landong sa langit ang dughan mo;
Pakatam-ison namo nga maulipon ka
Ang kamatayon sa ngalan mo.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:32 PM   #6
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Let's start the thread with the Cebuano version of the Philippine National Anthem

Nasudnong Awit (Cebuano version of the Philippine National Anthem, Lupang Hinirang)


Translated into Cebuano by Jess Vestil

Yutang tabunon
Mutya nga masilakon,
Putling bahandi,
Amo kang gimahal.
Mithing gisimba,
Yuta's mga bayani,
Sa manlulupig,
Pagadapigan ka.
Ang mga buntod mo,
Ug lapyahan sa langit mong bughaw,
Nagahulad sa awit, lamdag sa
Kaliwat tang gawas.
Silaw sa adlaw ug bituon
Sa nasudnong bandila,
Nagatima-an nga buhion ta
Ang atong pagka-usa.
Yutang maanyag, duyan ka sa pagmahal,
Landong sa langit ang dughan mo;
Pakatam-ison namo nga maulipon ka
Ang kamatayon sa ngalan mo.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ang_Bantayanon View Post
Bernie,

Nice thread. Anyway, does anyone out there know how many Filipinos know how to speak and write Cebuano?
Total speakers:

first language: 20 million (ethnologue)

second language: 11 million (est.)

source: Wikipedia
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:33 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ang_Bantayanon View Post
Bernie,

Nice thread. Anyway, does anyone out there know how many Filipinos know how to speak and write Cebuano?
Total speakers:

first language: 20 million (ethnologue)

second language: 11 million (est.)

source: Wikipedia
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:39 PM   #9
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Cebuano, also known as Sugboanon, is an Austronesian language spoken in the Philippines by about 20,000,000 (ethnologue) people and is a subgroup or member of Bisaya, Visayan and Binisayâ. The name came from the Philippine island of Cebu, with the Spanish suffix -ano meaning native, of a place, added at the end. Cebuano is given the ISO 639-2 three letter code ceb, but has no ISO 639-1 two letter code.

Cebuano is a member of the Visayan language family.

The Visayan languages of the Philippines, along with Tagalog and Bikol, are part of the Central Philippine language family. Most Visayan languages are spoken in the Visayas region but they are also spoken in the Bicol Region (particularly in Sorsogon and Masbate), islands south of Luzon such as those that make up Romblon, the northern and western areas of Mindanao, and the province of Sulu located southwest of Mindanao. Some residents of Metro Manila also speak Visayan.

Over thirty languages constitute the Visayan language family. The Visayan language with the most speakers is Cebuano, spoken by 20 million people as a native language in Central Visayas, northern and eastern parts of Mindanao. Two other well-known Visayan languages are Hiligaynon, spoken by 7 million in western Visayas and Waray-Waray spoken by 3 million in eastern Visayas.

Nomenclature


Native speakers of Visayan languages, especially Cebuano, Hiligaynon, and Waray-Waray not only refer to their language by their local name, but also by Bisaya or Binisaya, meaning Visayan language. This is misleading or may lead to confusion as different languages may be called Bisaya by their respective speakers despite their languages being mutually unintelligible. However, languages that are classified within the Visayan language family but spoken natively in places outside of the Visayas do not use the self-reference Bisaya or Binisaya. To speakers of Butuanon, Suriganon, and Masbatenyo, the term Bisaya usually refers to Cebuano. Since Tausugs are mostly Muslims, they view the term Bisaya as a religious term referring to Christian Filipinos (mostly referring either to Cebuano or Hiligaynon as they are the neighboring languages). One must also recognize the distinction between this Bisaya language and people and that of the Malaysian Bisaya.

Geographic distribution
Regions in the Philippines where Visayan languages are predominantly spoken.
Regions in the Philippines where Visayan languages are predominantly spoken.

The Visayan languages are further divided into five subfamilies. The list below is by no means exhaustive. Asi and Cebuano constitute their own subfamilies. For a complete listing and information on all Bisayan languages, refer to http://www.ethnologue.com/show_family.asp?subid=92372

* Asi - spoken in towns on Tablas Island as well as the islands of Banton, Simara, and Maestro de Campo in Romblon province..

* Cebuano
- includes Boholano.

* Southern Visayan - Tausug, Butuanon, and Surigaonon (including Jaun-Jaun).

* Central Visayan - includes Hiligaynon, Waray-Waray, Romblomanon, Ati, Capiznon, Masbatenyo, Porohanon, the Bisakol languages of Sorsogon and Northern Samar, and others.

* Western Visayan - includes Kinaray-a (the major language of Antique), Aklan languages (Aklanon, Malaynon), Onhan, Caluyanon, Cuyonon, Ratagnon, and others.



Table of speakers
Language Speakers
Aklanon 394,545 (1990 census)
Ati
1,500 (1980 SIL)
Bantoanon 200,000 (2002 SIL)
Butuanon 34,547 (1990 census)
Caluyanon 30,000 (1994 SIL)
Capiznon 638,653(2000)
Cebuano 20,043,502 in the Philippines (1995 census)
Cuyonon 123,384 (1990 census)
Hiligaynon 7,000,000 in the Philippines (1995)
Inonhan
85,829 (2000 WCD)
Kinaray-A 377,529 (1994 SIL)
Malaynon 8,500 (1973 SIL)
Masbatenyo 350,000 (2002 SIL)
Porohanon 23,000
Ratagnon 2 to 3 (2000 Wurm) (Nearly extinct)
Romblomanon and Asi) 200,000 (1987 SIL)
Sorsogon, Masbate 85,000 (1975 census)
Sorsogon, Waray 185,000 (1975 census)
Surigaonon 344,974 (1990 census)
Tausug 900,000 in the Philippines (2000 SIL) (Population total all countries: 1,022,000)
Waray-Waray 2,437,688 (1990 census)
Total 33,463,654

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visayan_languages
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:39 PM   #10
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Cebuano, also known as Sugboanon, is an Austronesian language spoken in the Philippines by about 20,000,000 (ethnologue) people and is a subgroup or member of Bisaya, Visayan and Binisayâ. The name came from the Philippine island of Cebu, with the Spanish suffix -ano meaning native, of a place, added at the end. Cebuano is given the ISO 639-2 three letter code ceb, but has no ISO 639-1 two letter code.

Cebuano is a member of the Visayan language family.

The Visayan languages of the Philippines, along with Tagalog and Bikol, are part of the Central Philippine language family. Most Visayan languages are spoken in the Visayas region but they are also spoken in the Bicol Region (particularly in Sorsogon and Masbate), islands south of Luzon such as those that make up Romblon, the northern and western areas of Mindanao, and the province of Sulu located southwest of Mindanao. Some residents of Metro Manila also speak Visayan.

Over thirty languages constitute the Visayan language family. The Visayan language with the most speakers is Cebuano, spoken by 20 million people as a native language in Central Visayas, northern and eastern parts of Mindanao. Two other well-known Visayan languages are Hiligaynon, spoken by 7 million in western Visayas and Waray-Waray spoken by 3 million in eastern Visayas.

Nomenclature


Native speakers of Visayan languages, especially Cebuano, Hiligaynon, and Waray-Waray not only refer to their language by their local name, but also by Bisaya or Binisaya, meaning Visayan language. This is misleading or may lead to confusion as different languages may be called Bisaya by their respective speakers despite their languages being mutually unintelligible. However, languages that are classified within the Visayan language family but spoken natively in places outside of the Visayas do not use the self-reference Bisaya or Binisaya. To speakers of Butuanon, Suriganon, and Masbatenyo, the term Bisaya usually refers to Cebuano. Since Tausugs are mostly Muslims, they view the term Bisaya as a religious term referring to Christian Filipinos (mostly referring either to Cebuano or Hiligaynon as they are the neighboring languages). One must also recognize the distinction between this Bisaya language and people and that of the Malaysian Bisaya.

Geographic distribution
Regions in the Philippines where Visayan languages are predominantly spoken.
Regions in the Philippines where Visayan languages are predominantly spoken.

The Visayan languages are further divided into five subfamilies. The list below is by no means exhaustive. Asi and Cebuano constitute their own subfamilies. For a complete listing and information on all Bisayan languages, refer to http://www.ethnologue.com/show_family.asp?subid=92372

* Asi - spoken in towns on Tablas Island as well as the islands of Banton, Simara, and Maestro de Campo in Romblon province..

* Cebuano
- includes Boholano.

* Southern Visayan - Tausug, Butuanon, and Surigaonon (including Jaun-Jaun).

* Central Visayan - includes Hiligaynon, Waray-Waray, Romblomanon, Ati, Capiznon, Masbatenyo, Porohanon, the Bisakol languages of Sorsogon and Northern Samar, and others.

* Western Visayan - includes Kinaray-a (the major language of Antique), Aklan languages (Aklanon, Malaynon), Onhan, Caluyanon, Cuyonon, Ratagnon, and others.



Table of speakers
Language Speakers
Aklanon 394,545 (1990 census)
Ati
1,500 (1980 SIL)
Bantoanon 200,000 (2002 SIL)
Butuanon 34,547 (1990 census)
Caluyanon 30,000 (1994 SIL)
Capiznon 638,653(2000)
Cebuano 20,043,502 in the Philippines (1995 census)
Cuyonon 123,384 (1990 census)
Hiligaynon 7,000,000 in the Philippines (1995)
Inonhan
85,829 (2000 WCD)
Kinaray-A 377,529 (1994 SIL)
Malaynon 8,500 (1973 SIL)
Masbatenyo 350,000 (2002 SIL)
Porohanon 23,000
Ratagnon 2 to 3 (2000 Wurm) (Nearly extinct)
Romblomanon and Asi) 200,000 (1987 SIL)
Sorsogon, Masbate 85,000 (1975 census)
Sorsogon, Waray 185,000 (1975 census)
Surigaonon 344,974 (1990 census)
Tausug 900,000 in the Philippines (2000 SIL) (Population total all countries: 1,022,000)
Waray-Waray 2,437,688 (1990 census)
Total 33,463,654

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visayan_languages
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:41 PM   #11
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Geographic distribution

Cebuano is spoken natively by the inhabitants of Cebu, Bohol, Negros Oriental and some parts of Leyte and the Samar islands and throughout Mindanao. It is also spoken in a few towns and islands in Samar. Until 1975, Cebuano surpassed Tagalog in terms of number of native speakers. Some dialects of Cebuano give different names to the language. Residents of Bohol may refer to Cebuano as Bol-anon while Cebuano-speakers in Leyte may call their dialect Kana. It is also spoken by Warays in Samar and Leyte, Eskaya in Bohol, and by native (like Atas, Bagobos, and Bukidnons), migrant Filipino ethnic groups (like Ilocanos and Ilonggos), and foreign ethnic groups (like Indonesians, Spanish, and Koreans) as second language. Cebuano is a language with Verb Subject Object sentence order. It uses prepositions rather than postpositions. Nouns come after adjectives, but before genitives or relative phrases.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:41 PM   #12
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Geographic distribution

Cebuano is spoken natively by the inhabitants of Cebu, Bohol, Negros Oriental and some parts of Leyte and the Samar islands and throughout Mindanao. It is also spoken in a few towns and islands in Samar. Until 1975, Cebuano surpassed Tagalog in terms of number of native speakers. Some dialects of Cebuano give different names to the language. Residents of Bohol may refer to Cebuano as Bol-anon while Cebuano-speakers in Leyte may call their dialect Kana. It is also spoken by Warays in Samar and Leyte, Eskaya in Bohol, and by native (like Atas, Bagobos, and Bukidnons), migrant Filipino ethnic groups (like Ilocanos and Ilonggos), and foreign ethnic groups (like Indonesians, Spanish, and Koreans) as second language. Cebuano is a language with Verb Subject Object sentence order. It uses prepositions rather than postpositions. Nouns come after adjectives, but before genitives or relative phrases.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:41 PM   #13
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Sounds

Cebuano has sixteen consonants: p, t, k, ʔ (the glottal stop), b, d, g, m, n, ng, s, h, w, l, r and y. There are three vowels: i, a, and u/o. The vowels u and o are allophones, with u always being used when it is the beginning of a syllable, and o always used when it ends a syllable. But there are some exceptions, like kamatuoran (truth) and hangtúd (until). When Spanish arrived, e has been added, but exclusive to foreign loanwords. Accent is also a distinguisher of words, so that dápit means "to invite", while dapít means "near" or "nearby place". Consonants [d] and [ɾ] were once allophones, but cannot interchange, like kabunturan (uplands) [from buntód, mountain] is correct but not kabuntudan and tagadihá (from there) [from dihá, there] is correct but not tagarihá.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:41 PM   #14
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Sounds

Cebuano has sixteen consonants: p, t, k, ʔ (the glottal stop), b, d, g, m, n, ng, s, h, w, l, r and y. There are three vowels: i, a, and u/o. The vowels u and o are allophones, with u always being used when it is the beginning of a syllable, and o always used when it ends a syllable. But there are some exceptions, like kamatuoran (truth) and hangtúd (until). When Spanish arrived, e has been added, but exclusive to foreign loanwords. Accent is also a distinguisher of words, so that dápit means "to invite", while dapít means "near" or "nearby place". Consonants [d] and [ɾ] were once allophones, but cannot interchange, like kabunturan (uplands) [from buntód, mountain] is correct but not kabuntudan and tagadihá (from there) [from dihá, there] is correct but not tagarihá.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:46 PM   #15
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Grammar

Pronouns

Nouns in Cebuano are inflected for person, number, and case.

The four cases are nominative, preposed genitive, postposed genitive, and oblique.

Cases - Absolutive - Ergative₁(Postposed) - Ergative₂(Preposed) - Oblique
1st person singular - ako, ko - nako, ko - akong - kanako, nako
2nd person singular - ikaw, ka - nimo, mo - imong - kanimo, nimo
3rd person singular - siya - niya - iyang - kaniya, niya
1st person plural inclusive - kita, ta - nato - atong - kanato, nato
1st person plural exclusive - kami, mi - namo - among - kanamo, namo
2nd person plural - kamo, mo - ninyo - inyong - kaninyo, ninyo
3rd person plural - sila - nila - ilang - kanila, nila

Cebuano, like most other Austronesian languages, makes use of the inclusive and exclusive we. This distinction, not found in most European languages, signifies whether or not the addressee is included in the pronoun "we."

Examples:

Moadto kami sa sine.
"We (someone else and I, but not you) will go to the movies."

Moadto kita sa sine.
"We (you and I, and perhaps someone else) will go to the movies."
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:46 PM   #16
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Grammar

Pronouns

Nouns in Cebuano are inflected for person, number, and case.

The four cases are nominative, preposed genitive, postposed genitive, and oblique.

Cases - Absolutive - Ergative₁(Postposed) - Ergative₂(Preposed) - Oblique
1st person singular - ako, ko - nako, ko - akong - kanako, nako
2nd person singular - ikaw, ka - nimo, mo - imong - kanimo, nimo
3rd person singular - siya - niya - iyang - kaniya, niya
1st person plural inclusive - kita, ta - nato - atong - kanato, nato
1st person plural exclusive - kami, mi - namo - among - kanamo, namo
2nd person plural - kamo, mo - ninyo - inyong - kaninyo, ninyo
3rd person plural - sila - nila - ilang - kanila, nila

Cebuano, like most other Austronesian languages, makes use of the inclusive and exclusive we. This distinction, not found in most European languages, signifies whether or not the addressee is included in the pronoun "we."

Examples:

Moadto kami sa sine.
"We (someone else and I, but not you) will go to the movies."

Moadto kita sa sine.
"We (you and I, and perhaps someone else) will go to the movies."
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:48 PM   #17
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Vocabulary and borrowed words

Cebuano has long borrowed words from Spanish, such as krus [cruz] (cross), swerte [suerte] (luck), and brilyante [brillante] (brilliant). It has several hundred loan words from English as well, which are altered to conform to the limited phonemic inventory of Cebuano: brislit (bracelet), hayskul (high school), syapin (shopping), dikstrus (dextrose), sipir (zipper), bigsyat (big shot), or prayd tsikin (fried chicken), "espisyal"(special). There are also words from other languages like Arabic like salamat (thanks) and religious words like imam and Islam, and Sanskrit mahárlika [mahardikka] (nobility) and karma.

The use of asa and hain

Asa and hain - both mean where - have distinct uses in formal Cebuano writing.

Asa is used when asking about a place. Asa ka padulong? (Where are you going?) Asa ta molarga? (Where are we travelling to?)

Hain is used when asking about a person or thing. Hain na ang gunting? (Where is the pair of scissors?) Hain na si Arsenia? (Where is Arsenia?)

In modern spoken Cebuano, however, asa is commonly used to replace hain. You can rarely hear hain being used (and it is usually spoken by old native Cebuanos).
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:48 PM   #18
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Vocabulary and borrowed words

Cebuano has long borrowed words from Spanish, such as krus [cruz] (cross), swerte [suerte] (luck), and brilyante [brillante] (brilliant). It has several hundred loan words from English as well, which are altered to conform to the limited phonemic inventory of Cebuano: brislit (bracelet), hayskul (high school), syapin (shopping), dikstrus (dextrose), sipir (zipper), bigsyat (big shot), or prayd tsikin (fried chicken), "espisyal"(special). There are also words from other languages like Arabic like salamat (thanks) and religious words like imam and Islam, and Sanskrit mahárlika [mahardikka] (nobility) and karma.

The use of asa and hain

Asa and hain - both mean where - have distinct uses in formal Cebuano writing.

Asa is used when asking about a place. Asa ka padulong? (Where are you going?) Asa ta molarga? (Where are we travelling to?)

Hain is used when asking about a person or thing. Hain na ang gunting? (Where is the pair of scissors?) Hain na si Arsenia? (Where is Arsenia?)

In modern spoken Cebuano, however, asa is commonly used to replace hain. You can rarely hear hain being used (and it is usually spoken by old native Cebuanos).
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:53 PM   #19
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Posts: 13,640
Likes (Received): 507

Common expressions

* I am Miguel de Guia. Ako si Miguel de Guia.
* May I ask a question? Mahimo bang mangutana? or Puwede ko mangutana?
* How are you? Kumusta ka?
* Good. (I am well.) Maayo.
* How old are you? Pila'y imong idad?
* How much? Pila? or Tag-pila?
* How many? Pila?
* I don't know. Wala ko kahibalo. or Ambut.
* Good day! Maayong adlaw!
* Good Morning! Maayong buntag!
* Good Noon! Maayong udto!
* Good Afternoon! Maayong hapon! or Maayong Palis!
* Good Evening! Maayong gabii!
* Who are you? "Kinsa ka?" (Informal)
* When is Kanus-ǎ ang
* Where do you live? Asa ka nagpuyô?
* Where are you from? Taga-asa ka?
* Where are you going? Asa ka padulong?
* Where are they going? "Asa sila padulong?"
* Where is Asa ang
* Where is the bathroom? Asa man ang banyo?
* Where is the toilet? Asa man ang kasilyas? or Asa man ang CR? (CR = English "Comfort Room")
* Where is the market? Asa man ang merkado?
* What Unsa
* What's this? Unsa ni?
* What's that? Unsa nâ?
* What should we do? Unsay among buhaton? or Unsay atong buhaton? or Unsay angay namong buhaton? or Unsay angay natong buhaton
* What is your name? Unsay ngalan nimo? Unsay imong ngalan?, or colloquially, Kinsa'y ngalan nimo?
* What number of child are you? Ikapila ka sa imong pamilya? (Firstborn, secondborn, etc.; common expression in Cebuano, not English)
* I would like to buy that. Gusto ko mopalit anâ.
* I would like two of those. Gusto ko ug duha anâ.
* Hello, my name is Miko. Kumusta, Miko akong ngalan., or colloquially, Ako si Miko.
* Shut up Hilom! or Saba!
* Help Me! Tabangi ko!
* Help! Tabang!
* Please, help me! "Palihug tabangi ko!" or "Palihug tabangi ako!"
* Wait a minute Kadiyot lang or Huwat sâ
* What time is it? Unsa nang (namang) orasa?
* It's five o'clock Alas singko na
* I love you. Gihigugma ko ikaw. or Nahigugma ko nimo. or Gihigugma tika. or Gimahal ko ikaw
* Take care. Pag-ayo-ayo! or Pag-amping
* Take that! (slang) Usapa 'na! (literally "Chew it!")
* Ouch! Agay!
* Don't! Ayaw!
* Yes Oo, O
* No Dili, Di
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Old April 11th, 2007, 02:53 PM   #20
Sinjin P.
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Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: CEB, SIN
Posts: 13,640
Likes (Received): 507

Common expressions

* I am Miguel de Guia. Ako si Miguel de Guia.
* May I ask a question? Mahimo bang mangutana? or Puwede ko mangutana?
* How are you? Kumusta ka?
* Good. (I am well.) Maayo.
* How old are you? Pila'y imong idad?
* How much? Pila? or Tag-pila?
* How many? Pila?
* I don't know. Wala ko kahibalo. or Ambut.
* Good day! Maayong adlaw!
* Good Morning! Maayong buntag!
* Good Noon! Maayong udto!
* Good Afternoon! Maayong hapon! or Maayong Palis!
* Good Evening! Maayong gabii!
* Who are you? "Kinsa ka?" (Informal)
* When is Kanus-ǎ ang
* Where do you live? Asa ka nagpuyô?
* Where are you from? Taga-asa ka?
* Where are you going? Asa ka padulong?
* Where are they going? "Asa sila padulong?"
* Where is Asa ang
* Where is the bathroom? Asa man ang banyo?
* Where is the toilet? Asa man ang kasilyas? or Asa man ang CR? (CR = English "Comfort Room")
* Where is the market? Asa man ang merkado?
* What Unsa
* What's this? Unsa ni?
* What's that? Unsa nâ?
* What should we do? Unsay among buhaton? or Unsay atong buhaton? or Unsay angay namong buhaton? or Unsay angay natong buhaton
* What is your name? Unsay ngalan nimo? Unsay imong ngalan?, or colloquially, Kinsa'y ngalan nimo?
* What number of child are you? Ikapila ka sa imong pamilya? (Firstborn, secondborn, etc.; common expression in Cebuano, not English)
* I would like to buy that. Gusto ko mopalit anâ.
* I would like two of those. Gusto ko ug duha anâ.
* Hello, my name is Miko. Kumusta, Miko akong ngalan., or colloquially, Ako si Miko.
* Shut up Hilom! or Saba!
* Help Me! Tabangi ko!
* Help! Tabang!
* Please, help me! "Palihug tabangi ko!" or "Palihug tabangi ako!"
* Wait a minute Kadiyot lang or Huwat sâ
* What time is it? Unsa nang (namang) orasa?
* It's five o'clock Alas singko na
* I love you. Gihigugma ko ikaw. or Nahigugma ko nimo. or Gihigugma tika. or Gimahal ko ikaw
* Take care. Pag-ayo-ayo! or Pag-amping
* Take that! (slang) Usapa 'na! (literally "Chew it!")
* Ouch! Agay!
* Don't! Ayaw!
* Yes Oo, O
* No Dili, Di
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