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Old September 4th, 2014, 02:57 PM   #481
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Scotswood Road Bridge and Scotswood Suspension Bridge

Some photographs of the bridges courtesy of the Newcastle City Libraries Archive Collection on Flickr:

015280:Scotswood Bridges Newcastle upon Tyne 1966
Type : Photograph Medium : Print-black-and-white Description : A 1966 view of the first and second Scotswood Bridges taken from Heath Crescent Newcastle upn Tyne. To the right is the second Scotswood Bridge which is under construction. To the left is the first Scotswood Bridge which is still being used by traffic. The second Scotswood Bridge was not completed until 1967



026090: Scotswood Bridge, Newcastle upon Tyne, 1901
Type : Lantern Slide Description : A view of Scotswood Bridge taken in 1901. The view is of the suspension or 'chain' bridge which opened in 1831. The photograph has been taken from further down the river looking up to Scotswood Bridge. In the foreground there are two boats on the river bank and two in the river.



062237:Scotswood Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown c.1890
Type : Photograph Medium : Print-black-and-white Description : A view of the Scotswood Bridge taken c.1890. The bridge opened in 1831 and was a suspension or 'chain' bridge. There is open land in the foreground and across the river in Gateshead. The toll house is to the left of Scotswood Bridge



050923:Scotswood Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown 1907
Type : Photograph Medium : Print-black-and-white Description : A 1907 view of Scotswood Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne. The bridge opened in 1831 and was a suspension or 'chain' bridge. The photograph has been taken on Scotswood Bridge looking towards the Gateshead side of the river. There are several men standing near the exit from the bridge one of them is holding the reins of a horse-drawn cart



058095:Scotswood Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown c.1966

Type : Photograph Medium : Print-black-and-white Description : A view of the second Scotswood Bridge taken c. 1966. The bridge opened in 1967. In the photograph to the right can be seen Scotswood Bridge under construction. To the left of the second bridge can be seen the first Scotswood Bridge



003377:Scotswood Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown 1931

Type : Lantern Slide Description : A 1931 view of Scotswood Road Bridge. The bridge opened in 1831 and was a suspension or 'chain' bridge. The photograph has been taken from the Newcastle side of the river looking across to Scotswood Bridge. In the background there are houses on the river bank.



051145:Scotswood Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown 1910
Type : Lantern Slide Description : A view of Scotswood Suspension Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne taken in 1910. The view is looking across the river to Blaydon. There is a large meadow in the foreground. Rowing boats can be seen on the river bank at Blaydon



065281:Scotswood Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Allam T.
Type : Print Medium : Engraving-handcoloured Description : An 1832 engraving of Scotswood Bridge. The bridge was completed in 1831 and was a suspension or 'chain' bridge. Scotswood Bridge is shown in a rural setting with fields and trees in the foreground and in the background



38674a:Scotswood Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown 1967

Type : Photograph Medium : Print-black-and-white Description : A 1967 view of the demolition of the first Scotswood Bridge. The bridge had been built in 1967. The photograph shows one of the stone suspension towers with the metal chains being taken apart

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Old September 4th, 2014, 03:17 PM   #482
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Where some of the masonry from the Scotswood Bridge in post above ended up

Where some 2,500 tons of the masonry from the the pillars of the bridge in post immediately above ended up:-

See this post http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=434

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Old September 4th, 2014, 03:49 PM   #483
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Scotswood Bridge

Just been looking through the previous posts on the Scotswood Bridge and came across this fine one from johnnypd from back in 2009:

image hosted on flickr


Not only a good reminder of the old suspension bridge (Chain Bridge) but also the inclusion of one of the ash hoppers heading upstream for another load from the Power Station at Lemmington. They were designed so that their height permitted them to so under the Swing Bridge without the need for it to open.

I have memories of the old bridge - we used to go across to see an Aunt in Blaydon and would get off on the north side and walk across. I found it a terrifying experience as many of the wooden slats in the walkway were damaged and you could see the river beneath.
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Old September 16th, 2014, 01:49 PM   #484
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Blaydon Road Bridge

Designed by Bullen and Partners with building work by Edmund Nuttall, Blaydon Road Bridge was built between 1987 and 1990, now carrying the A1. It was opened to traffic on 3rd December 1990, the Queen having officially unveiled a plaque on the bridge, 1st December 1990.

The cost of buildings the bridge was £17 millions

Dimensions are:
Total length 332 m
Width 14.6 m
Longest span 108 m

(Source: Crossing the Tyne by Manders and Potts)

These photographs taken 5th August 2014:

From the south side of the Tyne











From the north side of the Tyne






Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.c...0Road%20Bridge
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Old September 20th, 2014, 02:18 PM   #485
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Scotswood Road Bridge

I was wandering through Jack Phillips Clippings Collection and happened upon this article from the Newcastle Evening Chronicle of July 16 1963:


Scan hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.c...0Road%20Bridge
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Old September 20th, 2014, 04:24 PM   #486
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Why oh why did they demolish that wonderful suspension bridge?
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Old September 20th, 2014, 05:51 PM   #487
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Quote:
Originally Posted by No Opinion View Post

Why oh why did they demolish that wonderful suspension bridge?
Two lanes, built for horses and carriages rather than motor vehicles, falling to bits, expensive to maintain etc etc.
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Old September 20th, 2014, 07:45 PM   #488
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Two lanes, built for horses and carriages rather than motor vehicles, falling to bits, expensive to maintain etc etc.
I can understand its need to be replaced, and its expenditure to maintain, but even so, what a loss.

Reminds me of the old Iron Bridge across the Wear at Sunderland. Yes it needed replacing, with the adjacent Wearmouth Bridge, but it should have been preserved as it was a masterful example of early bridge building. Not exactly sure of its dimensions, but i think i heard it was a contemporary of the Iron Bridge at Coalbrookdale, only three times the length and far more impressive. What it would mean for Sunderland to have that still.
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Old September 20th, 2014, 08:48 PM   #489
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Quote:
Originally Posted by No Opinion View Post
I can understand its need to be replaced, and its expenditure to maintain, but even so, what a loss.

Reminds me of the old Iron Bridge across the Wear at Sunderland. Yes it needed replacing, with the adjacent Wearmouth Bridge, but it should have been preserved as it was a masterful example of early bridge building. Not exactly sure of its dimensions, but i think i heard it was a contemporary of the Iron Bridge at Coalbrookdale, only three times the length and far more impressive. What it would mean for Sunderland to have that still.
Yes it would have been good to keep Scotswood Suspension Bridge from a heritage perspective and indeed there was a vigorous campaign at the time to have that done. However it was the cost of maintenance that decided its fate, constant problems with its chains and anchors corroding.
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Old September 27th, 2014, 01:59 PM   #490
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Bridges over the River Tyne, 1952

This photograph has recently been uploaded by Tyne & Wear Museums to their Flickr Photostream.

Bridges over the River Tyne, 1952
Aerial view of the bridges of the River Tyne, August 1952 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/2/8597A).


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Old September 27th, 2014, 02:23 PM   #491
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Bridges over the River Tyne & central Newcastle and Gateshead areas, June 2014

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
This photograph has recently been uploaded by Tyne & Wear Museums to their Flickr Photostream.

Bridges over the River Tyne, 1952
Aerial view of the bridges of the River Tyne, August 1952 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/2/8597A).



To compare with "Bridges in 1952" picture above - these aerial pictures from the Trinity Square Development, Gateshead, from June 2014, kindly supplied to me by Bowmer and Kirkland Ltd (with permission to use)

Not quite the same angle but comparison can be easily made









Images hosted on Photobucket

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Old September 27th, 2014, 05:08 PM   #492
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[/QUOTE]



Comparing these fantastic old and new aerial photos it becomes very easy to see how the higher and longer spanning Bridges over the Tyne have effectively pushed the town centre of Gateshead further South up the hill.

The associated infrastructure to these bridges then cut the Town Centre off from its regressional wake, allowing for an invasion from the Newcastle side, of the Baltic, Sage, Hilton and Ochre Yards, which leap across the river.

Time for Gateshead to re assert itself and break through these barriers and the urban core can feel attached once again.
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Old October 12th, 2014, 12:02 PM   #493
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Calls for the the iconic Tyne Bridge to be given a facelift as it starts to look a bit shabby

Courtesy of the Chronicle Live/Sunday Sun, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...-given-7916678
Calls for the the iconic Tyne Bridge to be given a facelift as it starts to look a bit shabby
Oct 12, 2014 08:00 By Craig Thompson



It is the symbol of the North and recognised across the world . . . but is the Tyne Bridge in need of a facelift?

The North East’s most recognisable landmark has not been painted in almost 15 years, and is not scheduled for a touch up for at least another two. But, as our photographs show, the iconic structure is looking a little bit the worse for wear, with large sections of paint missing and a covering of bird droppings.

It’s unclear when the bridge will next see a lick of paint, although Newcastle City Council today said a paint job has been pencilled into their 2017/18 budget. However, some visitors crossing the bridge this weekend say improvement works are needed a lot sooner.

Bobbie Greenfield, 60, retired, of Hebburn, said: “Just a few weeks ago the Great North Run sign was up there and the bridge looked glorious on the TV. But when you get up close, you can see it’s not looking quite so healthy Because it’s such a symbol of the area, I’d like to see it as well looked after as it possibly could be.”

The bridge cost around £66,000 to repaint in 1976, but 10 times that in 1985, and £1.9m in 2000.

Read more and see image gallery @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...-given-7916678

Here are some of my images from 2000 of the New Tyne Bridge receiving its last makeover:




















Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.c...%20-%20Vol%201
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Old October 13th, 2014, 11:26 AM   #494
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Hexham Bridge

Grade II* Listed Hexham Bridge, crossing the Tyne, some images taken of and from on 10th October 2014.

the Protection Listing courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co...-bridge-acomb-

Description: Hexham Bridge

Grade: II*
Date Listed: 2 October 1951
English Heritage Building ID: 239008

OS Grid Reference: NY9406964679
OS Grid Coordinates: 394069, 564679
Latitude/Longitude: 54.9767, -2.0942

Location: A6079, Acomb, Northumberland NE46 3SG

Locality: Sandhoe
County: Northumberland
Country: England
Postcode: NE46 3SG

Hexham Bridge

NY 9464 10/109 2.10.51.

II*

1793. Fifth bridge built within 30 years of each other; previous ones destroyed by flood. 9 arched stone bridge designed by engineer-architect Robert Mylne. Blind oculi with 4 keystones in spandrels of arches.

Listing NGR: NY9406964679










Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.c...exham%20Bridge
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Old October 27th, 2014, 02:03 PM   #495
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A view from the Swing Bridge, 8th June 2014 given the HDR treatment.


Image hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.c...%20-%20Vol%201
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Old November 4th, 2014, 01:01 PM   #496
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Ovingham Bridge repair delays put traders’ survival at risk

From today's Hexham Courant @ http://www.hexhamcourant.co.uk/news/...risk-1.1172465
Ovingham Bridge repair delays put traders’ survival at risk
4th November 2014

BUSINESSES in Low Prudhoe are fearing for their survival following news that Ovingham Bridge will be closed for over a year.

Northumberland County Council has confirmed that the contractor is currently four weeks behind schedule due to extra metal work repairs required in the course of the bridge’s £3m facelift. The delay means that the anticipated completion date has been stretched from 12 to 13 months.

A number of local traders who operate from properties close to the bridge in Low Prudhoe are already suffering from a drop in trade after just three months of closure. Leigh Dixon is the owner of children’s soft play centre, Funstation which has been open at Station Road in Low Prudhoe for just under a year. She said: “The bridge closure has had an impact on business, people are saying that because the bridge is closed it’s not as easy to come in. We are missing a few groups of people who used to come over from Ovingham regularly. The ‘road closed’ sign at the bottom of Station Bank has also had an effect because people approaching think our road is inaccessible. I’ve had people asking if we’re still open; I had to put a banner up on Glendinning Recovery’s fence to let people know.”

Following representations from traders and Hexham’s MP Guy Opperman, the county council’s highways agency has installed two additional “Business as usual” signs on Station Road.

Extra work on the bridge was deemed necessary after the frame for the bracing, which holds the trusses in place at the Ovingham end, was found to be corroded. Repairs had to be carried out before the existing deck could be demolished to ensure that when the deck was removed, the trusses remained stable. That work has now been completed and demolition of the deck has started.

Read more @ http://www.hexhamcourant.co.uk/news/...risk-1.1172465
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Old November 13th, 2014, 11:05 AM   #497
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Calendar created from archive pictures of Tyne Bridge construction

From yesterday's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/cal...s-tyne-8098176
Calendar created from archive pictures of Tyne Bridge construction
Nov 12, 2014 19:00 By Tony Henderson


Tyne Bridge calendar picture

Photographs from the collection of one of the key figures behind the building of the Tyne Bridge will now be seen by thousands as part of a 2015 calendar.

The calendar has been created by Tyne Wear Archives and Museums (TWAM). The pictures, together with personal effects and family documents, were donated to TWAM. They belonged to Jame Geddie, who died in 1944.

His early career in civil and bridge engineering took him to South Africa, Argentina and the Middle East and to Greece with the army in the First World War. And in 1925 he was chief assistant engineer on the construction of the Tyne Bridge.

“It is likely that he worked closely with photographers on their visits to the bridge, suggesting many of the view points and organising assistance to get the cameras and tripods in place,” said John Clayson, keeper of science and industry at TWAM.

The calendar is £9.99, from Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums shops including Discovery Museum, the Great North Museum and the Laing Art Gallery, and also online at www.twmuseums.org.uk/shop .

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/cal...s-tyne-8098176
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Old November 20th, 2014, 03:35 PM   #498
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On This Day In History - 20th November 2000

So it was 14 years ago today that the Gateshead Millennium Bridge was lifted into place - On This Day In History - 20th November 2000.

This is a note I wrote on the occasion:

Well I eventually managed, at long last (weather delayed the journey of the Bridge), to get photographs of the Millennium Eye Bridge as it made it's majestic way from Howdon to the Quayside.

I got to Jarrow Staithes (just along from the Marine Police Station) at 07.30 to see the Asian Hercules II and it's precious cargo just leaving the AMEC yard at Point Pleasant. As was par for the course, 'officially' the time of departure had been set as 08.00, so luckily I had left in plenty of time. Low and behold, whilst the 'Authorities' had set down a load of No Parking bollards, I was the only one there.

Took some photographs of the procession setting off (wonder if I'm the only one to get some snaps of this)

One thing that was noticeable was the fact that the bridge was being carried by the crane at a 90 degree angle, i.e. head on and not the 180 degree, i.e. bridge across the river, as had been shown on computerised images.

Into the car and headed for Hebburn Riverside Park where the frost covered wooden promenade summed up the freezing cold, but clear day.

One or two folk about and therefore managed to get a good position for taking some snaps. As the move up river had commenced earlier than expected there was a sudden rush of folk who just made it to the Park before the jib of the crane hoved into view.

By the time the Millennium Bridge reached the Park there was already a sizeable crowd with quite a few South Tyneside Council Officials attempting to control the traffic.

From Hebburn Riverside Park the view of the crane and bridge was spectacular and it was so close to the shore that you could imagine reaching out and touching them both. By this time, about 08.15, the sun had risen and was reflecting off the crane and bridge, adding to the spectacle.

As soon as the procession had passed it was into the car again, this time heading for Bill Quay where a fantastic view of the crane and bridge could be obtained from quite high up on the valley of the river. At this point in the river it is quite straight from the bend at Wallsend and Bill Quay. Lots of folk were at Bill Quay, most, if not all, carrying camera's, whether they be digital, analogue of video.

Again it was off in the car, this time to South Shore where another sizeable crowd had gathered. A great view from here of the procession coming round the bend from Friars Goose.

Then onto Newcastle to try and get a photograph of the bridge arriving at the Quayside. A lot of traffic problems getting to the Quayside, I suppose everyone had the same idea and most, if not all of the car parks on the Quayside had been closed for the day. Anyway managed to park for free in Hanover Street.

Along to the Quayside and just missed the actual arrival, but hey, that's life.

Big crowds (10,000 according to the press, but I would doubt this figure) had already gathered so it was quite difficult to get a good position to take a photograph. However, where there's a will there's a way and I managed to get shots from a number of different angles. As it was a very sunny day, and the sun was in the South, it made for some 'interesting' shots.

The crowd was a wide mixture of folk, ranging from office workers taking time out, to school kids, to pensioners and to many who must have taken a 'sickie'.

What a marvellous sight, the huge crane towering above the Quayside with the Millennium Bridge hung out in front.

After securing itself to an anchor at the stern, the Asian Hercules II was then attached to the bollards in the river, so they did become of use. The crane barge then manoeuvred itself inch by inch up river.

There then appeared to be a moment of pure comedy when The Harbour Masters cutter assisted in attempting to turn the bridge from 90 degrees to 180 degrees. This consisted of lines being attached to the cutter from the bridge, the idea being for the cutter to pull the bridge around. the first attempt nearly led to the cutter pulling itself in such a way that it nearly capsized. However, a second attempt resulted in setting the bridge in the necessary swing.

I eventually managed to get a good position overlooking the resting place of the bridge and managed to get some photographs of the bridge being lowered into position.

The accuracy of the manoeuvring to lower the bridge onto its mooring point was meticulous and certainly took a lot of time and effort, indeed having read the media coverage, it appears the engineers only had a 3 millimetre element of error.

I then joined the many spectators on the Tyne Bridge and what a sight the new bridge is from there. If anyone wants to get a 'real idea' of what the Millennium Bridge looks like, I would suggest this vantage point. The real artistry and magnificent lines of the bridges architecture can be witnessed from here.

A marvellous day out, history in the making witnessed and loads of photographs of the Millennium Bridges journey taken.

A small selection of photographs from the day:

Bridge sets off from Howdon:


Bridge passing Hebburn Riverside Park


Approaching Bill Quay


Arrival at the Quayside













Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.c...%20-%20Journey

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Old November 28th, 2014, 12:53 PM   #499
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William Martin - Design for High Level Bridge

Reading through the October 1887 edition of the North Country Lore and Legend I happened upon an article on Haltwhisle born William Martin, the Anti Newtonian Philosopher.

An interesting piece on Martin's life can be found on the Oxford DNB site @ http://www.oxforddnb.com/templates/a...id=18218&back=

He founded the Martinean Society, based on opposition to the Royal Society, and particularly hostile to the Newtonian theory of gravitation, against which he harboured a growing antagonism, which ultimately embraced all men of science. Styling himself ‘anti-newtonian’, Martin began giving lectures, first in the Newcastle district and from 1830 throughout England. Throughout these years his voice was heard at many meetings, ranting against scientists in general. He was inevitably drawn to the annual gatherings of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, the butt of his polemic The defeat of the eighth scientific meeting of the British Association of Asses, which we may properly call the rich folks' hopping, or the false philosophers in an uproar (1838). Newton remained his chief hate, but Herschel, Faraday, Sedgwick, and Lardner attracted his wrath. Declaring himself a staunch supporter of the Church of England he also denounced papists, bishops, Puseyites, Unitarians, and all those he considered to have left the true path. In a torrent of pamphlets he heaped abuse on impostors, false philosophers, and those who had converted his inventions to their own gain, continuing the while to work on further mechanical projects. In 1835 he proposed a new form of miners' safety lamp, and when it was rejected because of its fragility and uncertain performance he denounced the discoveries of George Stevenson and Humphry Davy in these fields as dishonest, claiming that they had stolen his ideas. Martin was a familiar figure in and around Newcastle: J. B. Langhorne described him as ‘a stout, portly man, perfectly cracked but harmless. He used to strut about wearing the Society of Arts medal round his neck’ (N&Q, 134). From 1849 Martin lived with his brother John at Chelsea, where he died on 9 February 1851.


Portrait by George Patten from the National Portait Gallery web site @ http://www.npg.org.uk/collections/se...role=sit&rNo=0

Anyway getting back to the Lore & Legend, these drawings were put forward by Martin as a potential High Level Bridge - like the idea of the lions on top of the arches. Evidently the lion was found on several of Martin's productions.




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Old Yesterday, 06:23 PM   #500
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On This Day In History - 21st December 1806

John Sykes reports this unfortunate but not rare example of damage being sustained by Haydon Bridge for this day in history 21st December 1806.

About ten o'clock on the morning, one of the arches of Haydon Bridge, about 95 feet in span, which had long shewn evident signs of weakness and decay, fell with a tremendous crash, just at the time a number of people were passing to church. One unfortunate man sunk with the ruins to the depth of forty feet, but was taken out alive, with a broken thigh bone and otherwise much bruised.

The old bridge is Grade II Listed and this is the protection text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co...bridge-haydon-

Description: Old Bridge Now Footbridge

Grade: II
Date Listed: 20 October 1952
English Heritage Building ID: 239294

OS Grid Reference: NY8432964294
OS Grid Coordinates: 384329, 564294
Latitude/Longitude: 54.9730, -2.2463

Location: Ratcliffe Road, Haydon, Northumberland NE47 6LL

Locality: Haydon
County: Northumberland
Country: England
Postcode: NE47 6LL

NY 8464 HAYDON HAYDON BRIDGE

13/44 Old bridge, now footbridge
20/10/52 (Previously listed as Haydon
Bridge

Bridge, c.1680, altered C20. Squared stone. Six segmental arches, 4 southern with arch rings, 2 northern ribbed, probably C20 rebuilds. Triangular cutwaters carried up as passing places. Parapet with chamfered coping, set forward on west in C20 widening.

Listing NGR: NY8432964294

These images were taken in July 2014:










Images hosted on www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
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Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
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bridges, historic newcastle, historic north east eng, history, millennium bridge, newcastle, newcastle transport, river tyne

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