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Old March 5th, 2008, 02:42 PM   #81
Metrolink
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They are just teasing us now.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 04:20 PM   #82
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Its a safe bet that this is going to get a lot of opposition (assuming they push ahead with it). Many motorists are already brassed off at the increasing amount of 'anti-car' development in this country.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 04:29 PM   #83
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Such as what?

It really pisses me off this idea of anti-car Britain.

I am a 'motorist', I drive about.

Exactly where are we anti-car for the law abiding citizen?
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Old March 5th, 2008, 04:42 PM   #84
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It’s a shame “Anti-public-transport-passenger” isn’t quite as snappy as “Anti-car”.

How is it anti car, to prioritise buses on a stretch of road where the vast majority of people travelling along it are in buses not cars? Why would there clearly be a lot of opposition to this scheme when the regular car users of this section of road are in the minority? That is of course unless members of the pro-car lobby who neither use the road nor are ever likely to, stick their nose in on some twisted notion of principle.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 04:50 PM   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metrolink View Post
Such as what?

It really pisses me off this idea of anti-car Britain.

I am a 'motorist', I drive about.

Exactly where are we anti-car for the law abiding citizen?
It seems you already have a general idea of what I meant. I don't agree with such protests myself.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 05:46 PM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Architecty View Post
It’s a shame “Anti-public-transport-passenger” isn’t quite as snappy as “Anti-car”.

How is it anti car, to prioritise buses on a stretch of road where the vast majority of people travelling along it are in buses not cars? Why would there clearly be a lot of opposition to this scheme when the regular car users of this section of road are in the minority? That is of course unless members of the pro-car lobby who neither use the road nor are ever likely to, stick their nose in on some twisted notion of principle.
"Anti-bus" is though. It just seems that fewer people are prepared to stick up for the bus.

I got the bus into Bolton the other day, for the first time in years, on the way to the theatre as we were both having a drink. It is a little under 4 miles. The price for a single ticket was £2.90. There were no cheap returns available. Total return cost = £10.60. On that bus were about 7 other people. Without wanting to sound ageist or elitist, I suspect that none of them had to pay full fare for various reasons.

By car, it would have cost less than £2 in petrol plus 90p parking. By taxi (which we got on the way back), it was about £6.



I won't be catching the bus again.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 05:55 PM   #87
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^ Why didn't you get a daysaver for about £3.50?
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Old March 5th, 2008, 06:04 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ferge View Post
Just need a mini central park to go at the end of it
Not quite central park, but the bus prioritised/car banning part of the scheme does end by Whitworth park, there's also Plattfields just the over side of Rusholme from it (still on same route).

On a seperate note, if this goes ahead, it will have a profound effect on the Man Uni campuss i.e. no major road going through the middle of it and a reduction from 4 lane to 2 lane road.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 08:10 PM   #89
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This is a great idea, I work on Oxford Rd and my head pounds at the end of the day from all the noise pollution outside the shop it really is horrendously noisy. I for one will be exstatic if this scheme goes ahead, the trees will also help to dampen any noise from the buses/trams whatever. Yes there are loads and loads of buses travelling down Oxford but there's at least twice as many cars per hour so this is good, it's not anti car it's just pro change/evolution. Lets face it, something HAS to be done about it, may as well be this.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 08:46 PM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chogmook View Post
^ Why didn't you get a daysaver for about £3.50?
Saver tickets aren't available after a certain time, according to the driver. No idea whether he was right or not.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 08:47 PM   #91
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if the money is there then it sounds like a good idea to me. the area is so overrun with pedestrians anyway that cars don't have much luck there and there are loads of lights to hold you up. meanwhile you've got boundary lane, cambridge street, princess road and upper brooke street relatively empty but people (myself included) choose to go down oxford road because we can't be bothered to think of a quicker route, and because it looks nice to drive down, and because we can stop at the offy for a can of coke. the only big bonus to the driver of oxford road is it doesn't connect with the mancunian way so sometimes it can be quicker than the alternatives but this lack of connection with the manc way is precisely why it is possible to cut this road out for cars without much side effects.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 09:00 PM   #92
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Fantastic idea. Been in off the record discussions about Deansgate. Dull stuff about estimating the width of the road, how much could be pedestrianised, whether trams, buss etc should be just allowed.

But not Oxford Road. Very much impressed although admitedly its not that startlingly original. But its doesnt need to be.

Of course its linked to possible C Charge and greater control over the buses and maybe future thinking of a Didsbury via Wilmslow Road to St Peters Sq tram-train service.

It will put more pressure on the two adjacent parrellel roads to the west and east, but that these exist allows some flexibility for private car drivers.

Also aside from the transport issues, a more ped friendly Oxford Road would encourage greater commerical use of this corner from Petersfield to Curry Alley. Its mostly populated by young some creative types. The market is already there it just needs its space to develop.

And it might actually be quite pleasant, especially as its north-south orientated and will always catch the light during the day.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 09:26 PM   #93
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care to expand any on those Deansgate discussions? they sound interesting actually.
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Old March 6th, 2008, 12:52 AM   #94
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City South (Manchester City South Partnership)

From Manchester Confidential. Link to new City South website below article. (lots of interesting stuff)

City South: where’s that?



Jonathan Schofield attends the launch of a new city area and wonders whether it'll amount to more than a hill of beans


City South. Go on where is it?

Manchester is re-branding areas again. We’ve got new names all over the place, a Victorian gent coming back would get in a right tizz trying to work out which bit’s which. Some of these re-brandings have worked and been adopted, some have gone nowhere.

Quote:
The ambition, is for the different groups, and others, to work together to create several thousand more jobs in an area which apparently already accounts for 12% (37,000 people) of the city centre’s workforce.
You might know where Chinatown and the Northern Quarter is, but come on folks have you heard of Petersfields or the Millennium Quarter? Outside the city, we’ve got places such as New East Manchester and North City.

So here comes City South. This was launched on Tuesday at Whitworth Art Gallery – the poor artworks have never seen so many suits – led by Sir Howard Bernstein, city chief executive, and Professor Alan Gilbert, the boss of the University of Manchester. Lots of words like ‘connectivity’ were used.

The new area is filled with big public bodies. The lead partnership will comprise the City Council, the University, the Metropolitan University, the Central Manchester and Manchester Children’s University Hospital’s NHS Trust and the North West Regional Development Agency. The universities and the hospitals are already investing £1.5bn into the area.

The geographical area stretches from Central Library to Rusholme, bounded by Upper Brook Street and Cambridge Street. The ambition, is for the different groups listed above, and others, to work together to create several thousand more jobs in an area which apparently already accounts for 12% (37,000 people) of the city centre’s workforce. More business words such as ‘maximising the economic potential of the area by harnessing the investment currently being made’ were bandied around at the opening. In many respects it’s a way of recognising the importance of this area - the city’s so-called ‘knowledge capital’.

The standout scheme, the unifying one, is the closing of Oxford Road to all vehicles and replacing the buses with a Bus Rapid Transit system (sort of coach-trams). This, on the face of it is eminently sensible, greatly speeding up travel from the city centre to the universities and the hospitals. But there are concerns. It would mean that buses from, say Didsbury and Withington, would have to be deflected east or west, unless passengers are supposed to get off at Whitworth Park and then use the Rapid Transit System. This might make worse the situation in Rusholme where a recent traffic calming scheme has slipped into coma with horrible traffic jams forming all through the day. An advantage of the new idea would be to create a strong civic sense of space down Oxford Road, make it an airy less fume-filled boulevard.

The timeframe for results from the City South initiative is woolly – five years was mentioned and then stretching on into some heavenly distance of urban fulfilment. In fact a lot of the scheme seemed woolly and dependent on other things. The Bus Rapid Transit system, for example, will depend on the success of the Transport Innovation Fund (Congestion Charging).

It looks like we’re going to have to wait before we can work out whether City South is more than just a talking shop. Or whether the area becomes as well known as Chinatown rather than disappearing up its own branding backside as happened with the Millennium Quarter.

www.manchestercitysouth.com
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Old March 6th, 2008, 12:56 AM   #95
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City South? Jesus that branding sucks.

Has no one in the town hall got an 1800s map to give them a bit of help in all this naming business?
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Old March 6th, 2008, 01:08 AM   #96
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http://www.manchestereveningnews.co....on_green_route

Watch HB discuss the proposal on video. Please stay still oh great one.
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Old March 6th, 2008, 10:21 AM   #97
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Click on link for video of Scu bus planned for the green corridor.

'Green corridor' plan hailed
Paul R Taylor
6/ 3/2008

RADICAL plans to transform one of Manchester's busiest roads into a `green corridor' have been welcomed by business leaders and environmentalists.

The proposals - revealed in yesterday's M.E.N - will see general traffic banned from a key half-mile stretch of Oxford Road to allow special central lanes for new `eco buses'.

The low-emission high-frequency shuttle service will run from Christie Hospital to Salford Crescent, and from Parrs Wood to Piccadilly, with Oxford Road railway station modernised to act as a terminal.

The vehicles - a cross between a coach and a tram - will ferry thousands of passengers into the city, shaving 15 minutes of the current commute and reducing pollution.

Oxford Road itself would be extensively remodelled along its length, and pedestrianised between Hathersage Road near to the Manchester Royal Infirmary, to Grosvenor Street near the Aquatics Centre.

Both business leaders and green campaigners say they are broadly in favour of the scheme, but that certain issues must be resolved and there must be full consultation.

Chris Fletcher, policy director at the Greater Manchester Chamber of Commerce, said: "These are very interesting proposals that if delivered correctly could have major benefits for enabling employees to get into the city centre quicker as well as reducing environmental impact.

"However, there are some questions that need answering such as what is the plan for businesses that rely on deliveries in those sections that will be closed to through traffic?

Volume

"There also needs to be full detailed plans on what happens to displaced traffic. While this scheme would reduce traffic volume it is important that it doesn't transfer problems to other areas."

The plans will not become reality for at least five years and rely on the introduction of congestion charging and the bid for the government's £3bn Transport Innovation Fund. If successful, there could be similar routes to Leigh and Bolton.

Mr Fletcher said: "The other element is that this is linked to the TIF bid being successful and the introduction of a congestion charge so it really is part of a much broader package of much needed public transport improvements.

"It is really important though that a full consultation process takes place to make sure what is delivered is sympathetic to people's needs and has maximum benefit."

The plans are included in the development framework for the south of the city, revealed at the launch of the Manchester City South Partnership.

The new agency plans to regenerate 600 acres surrounding the corridor and claims it can create 34,000 jobs.

As well as major new office and housing developments, Oxford Road will be revamped with news lines of trees, landscaping, multi-coloured lighting and public art.

Brian Candeland, chairman of Manchester Green Party, said: "This green corridor bus route is the sort of thing we should be looking at.

"We need radical solutions to deal with climate change and congestion.

Consultation

"Obviously there would need to be full consultation, and we would need to establish how it would affect things like cycle routes.

"But it sounds as if it has great potential - especially as it is something that could be extended elsewhere with minimum need for new infrastructure."

Oxford Road is officially the busiest bus route in Europe with more than 100 buses an hour.

Prof Rod Coombs, of Manchester University, is a representative on the partnership.

"The partnership has come together because both universities, the council and hospital trust have a shared interest in making Oxford Road a nicer place," he said. "If an academic or student can finish in the lab at 7pm, and then stroll up to the Cornerhouse or into the city centre, along an attractive road with interesting shops and open air cultural events, it's much more likely Manchester will attract the best.

"It's a much more attractive proposition than standing getting splashed by puddles as one of the scores of dirty, noisy and half-empty buses passes by."

Gordon Reid, chief executive of Cityco - which manages Manchester city centre, said: "Cityco is excited about the potential benefits that the Oxford Road `green corridor' will bring to the city.

"The area is, of course, hugely significant in its own right, but it is also an important ambassador route to the city centre. "The quality of the initiative being proposed would be to the advantage of the city centre, our own area of operation, as well as the south of the city and we look forward to building on our existing relationships with the City South Partnership."

http://www.manchestereveningnews.co....hailed?rss=yes
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Old March 6th, 2008, 09:27 PM   #98
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New agency established to unlock Manchester’s economic potential
Published Wednesday 5th March 08 in Business news

A new development agency for Manchester called Manchester City South Partnership has been set up to drive the knowledge economy and create 34,000 jobs for an area immediately south of the city centre.

The Partnership includes Manchester City Council, the University of Manchester, Manchester Metropolitan University and the Central Manchester and Manchester Children's University Hospitals NHS Trust and the North West Regional Development Agency.

Investment programmes totalling £1.5 billion are currently being undertaken by the universities and the Health Trust. The Partnership has been established to ensure these investments connect and offer maximum benefit for Manchester and the North West region.

The Partnership's first major task will be to undertake an extensive consultation exercise on the proposed development plans with all stakeholders. This will involve people who live and work in and around the area, university staff and students, hospital staff and patients, the wider business community, the arts and cultural community, retailers and commuters.

Professor Alan Gilbert, Chairman of the Manchester City South Partnership said: "What we are embarking on is one of the most ambitious and exciting development initiatives Manchester - and the region as a whole- has seen in a decade. It will encompass the huge university and hospital investment programmes that are already underway, creating iconic institutions that will not only advance education, science and innovation, but also more broadly enrich the culture, create jobs and enhance the economic and social wellbeing of the communities we serve."

Sir Howard Bernstein, Chief Executive of Manchester City Council added: "It is clear that this part of the city has significant economic growth potential and it's our mission to unlock this. Although our core objective is to maximise the area's contribution to the city and regional economy, the strategic development framework will also address a range of related issues including transport, environment, culture, retail, employment and linkage to surrounding communities, all of which are equally important for the sustainable future of the city. This is certainly going to be a challenge but one which we will embrace wholeheartedly with confidence and enthusiasm."

For more information and to download the strategic development framework visit www.manchestercitysouth.com
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Old March 7th, 2008, 12:58 AM   #99
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I wish I was in that position to share that form of information, but you should ask certain well known bureucrats on MCC if want, as I am not a Manchester council employee or elected member and cant expand.

But its really deadly dull stuff about ratios of space, over numbers of pedestrians and vehicles on major roads within the county. My bit was about its environmental impact of pollution and public health policies needed.

Loads of off the record suggestions are talked about all the time. Its not the Rgt Hon Metrolink nor just on this forum. But its so odd and funny that stuff mentioned as a half joke or in a moment of thought storming at a meeting, appears on here and even as policy.
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Old May 17th, 2008, 12:27 AM   #100
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Chief exec named for Manchester City South Partnership
By Simon Binns


Jackie Potter, currently executive director of tourism and regeneration at Blackpool Council, has been appointed chief executive of Manchester City South Partnership, a new agency launched in March.

The agency will spearhead the redevelopment of the Oxford Road corridor and try to create 34,000 jobs for the area.

Potter is a chartered surveyor and spent her earlier career with the Valuation Office Agency in Yorkshire until 1997. She then spent four years as district valuer and valuation officer for the North West Group based in Preston followed by the position of director with operational responsibility for half of the organisation's national network.

Before joining Blackpool Council in 2005 she worked at Government Office North West as director of spatial development responsible for the planning and transport policy and advice across the North West Region. At Blackpool, her responsibilities included leading the council's contribution to the physical and economic regeneration of the town, working closely with ReBlackpool URC.

Professor Alan Gilbert, chairman of the Manchester City South Partnership, said: "Jackie brings a wealth of experience which will prove invaluable in driving forward our plans for this part of the city. Our core objective is to maximise the area's contribution to the city and regional economy.”

Potter said: "The region's future depends on a vibrant and expanding knowledge economy, so the importance of this initiative should not be underestimated.”

She will take up the post in July.
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