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Old October 24th, 2007, 12:51 PM   #1001
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Veterans' Glass City Skyway Update

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Old October 24th, 2007, 02:59 PM   #1002
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Is the Skyway Center or whatever it was called still being planned or did this idea get scraped?
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Old October 24th, 2007, 11:09 PM   #1003
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Pardon my pun, you don't happen to be Opal Covey? She kept talking about a ferris wheel for the east side of the river during her run for mayor in 2000-01 endlessly.

I am definatly not Opal Covey. I am a junior at St. Johns Jesuit who is very interested in the way this community is being formed. I know that if they built a ferris wheel down there i would most definatly go down there more for dates, to eat, and enjoy toledo's skyline along with the Veterns Glass Skyway and its Colors during the night. Does anyone like this idea? I know i do. People may make fun because of my age but after all we are the generation who will take control after you. Teens are interested in the "New Thing" Fallen Timbers is new--so teens will be there. Westfield new (and always new stores comming in)-- teens. We are the ones who get to spend all of our parents money. The marina district needs something that will make it different from any other. A ferris wheel would make this distinction. Dont be fooled into thinking that this would not work, because obviously people before me have had the idea to.
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Old October 25th, 2007, 03:44 AM   #1004
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I'm a junior at St. Johns Jesuit who is very interested in the way this community is being formed. I know that if they built a ferris wheel down there i would most definatly go down there more for dates, to eat, and enjoy toledo's skyline along with the Veterns Glass Skyway and its Colors during the night. Does anyone like this idea? I know i do. People may make fun because of my age but after all we are the generation who will take control after you.

This may sound cynical, but that completely explains the earlier dating comments. Trust me, once you're 21 (I'm 22 myself), dating options expand exponentially. You can go to nice bars and clubs, 21+ shows, etc., etc. If you move to a true college town for school like Athens, Bowling Green, or Oxford (Ohio's best college towns), you lose dating options, but finding someone to hook up with is much easier. Toledo gives you both since it's a big city that also has a big university with an increasing on-campus and adjacent student population. It's not really a commuter school anymore. The majority of students live on campus or in neighborhoods adjacent to to it, so you will see a lot more businesses (mainly bars and retail) opening up in that section of Toledo. The UT area is already undergoing a small revival.

I don't think a Marina District ferris wheel is that bad of an idea. Dillin already said he's putting in an "urban river beach", so anything is possible I guess. Coney Island in Brooklyn has a big ferris wheel, right? Why not Toledo too? I'd support a ferris wheel, and the views would be incredible.

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Old October 25th, 2007, 04:24 AM   #1005
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i appreciate you not being a typical adult and saying that my opinion doesnt count or that my ideas arent of possible consideration. I hope that you dont look down upon me now that my true idenity is revealed...
The all-year ferris wheel is a good idea, in my perspective.
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Old October 25th, 2007, 06:50 AM   #1006
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Anyone know what's replacing the old Bob Evans across from Northtowne?
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Old October 25th, 2007, 12:30 PM   #1007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mudhen419 View Post
Is the Skyway Center or whatever it was called still being planned or did this idea get scraped?

I haven't read or heard anything of the latest.
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Old October 25th, 2007, 12:32 PM   #1008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovetoledo View Post
Pardon my pun, you don't happen to be Opal Covey? She kept talking about a ferris wheel for the east side of the river during her run for mayor in 2000-01 endlessly.

I am definatly not Opal Covey. I am a junior at St. Johns Jesuit who is very interested in the way this community is being formed. I know that if they built a ferris wheel down there i would most definatly go down there more for dates, to eat, and enjoy toledo's skyline along with the Veterns Glass Skyway and its Colors during the night. Does anyone like this idea? I know i do. People may make fun because of my age but after all we are the generation who will take control after you. Teens are interested in the "New Thing" Fallen Timbers is new--so teens will be there. Westfield new (and always new stores comming in)-- teens. We are the ones who get to spend all of our parents money. The marina district needs something that will make it different from any other. A ferris wheel would make this distinction. Dont be fooled into thinking that this would not work, because obviously people before me have had the idea to.

Thanks for clarifying yourself ilovetoledo, because Opal always talked about ferris wheel for years when she was on the campaign trail. However, I am still on the fence about the ferris wheel thingy and I think it's more suitable if it was built in between The Docks and Boyer ship museum because having a ferris wheel nearby residential development does not make sense.
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Old October 25th, 2007, 12:34 PM   #1009
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Quote:
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Anyone know what's replacing the old Bob Evans across from Northtowne?
tk29, an authentic, locally-owned Mexican restaurant is moving in from the last I heard.
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Old October 26th, 2007, 12:58 AM   #1010
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Starboard Condo's

Anyone have any info on this development?

http://duketporter.com/Starboard%20Side%20A.html

I've never explored that "neck of the woods." Hope this trend continues along the river. We need river living all along the downtown corridor, in my opinion. Hopefully the Marina District will spur more of these types of developments (single family homes too?) in the near future.
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Old October 26th, 2007, 11:57 AM   #1011
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^Some of them have already been built. I think they opened in 2005. They're pretty nice and they have great views of ship traffic on the river (Andersons and Cargill are just upstream).
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Old October 26th, 2007, 12:38 PM   #1012
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Quote:
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^Some of them have already been built. I think they opened in 2005. They're pretty nice and they have great views of ship traffic on the river (Andersons and Cargill are just upstream).
I second what Pilliod said, because they are sold out in terms of this project the nearby developments of the brand new Locke Branch library and medical center which just recently opened up and new bike trail/ widened south entrance to International Park/The Docks. It's a rather nice area especially Miami Street turns into River Road which is a great scenic road to travel on during the fall season.
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Old October 26th, 2007, 12:46 PM   #1013
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Delta: ZincOx Resources Development

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Old October 26th, 2007, 12:51 PM   #1014
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Downtown Arena Development Update

Arena prices
By Justin R. Kalmes
Toledo Free Press Metro Editor
[email protected]


Luxury suite prices for Lucas County's new multipurpose sports arena appear to be in line with premium seating charges offered at similar-size venues in other mid-level markets.

The new arena, which will seat 8,000 to 10,000 people, depending on its use, will feature 20 luxury suites with seating for 12 individuals. Leases will cost $40,000 for just hockey and arena football contests or $55,000 for all events in the building. Lease prices include 12 tickets for each event that falls within its respective agreement, but do not include food and beverage fees.

It is expected the new Toledo arena will house an ECHL hockey franchise and an Arena Football League 2 team. The ECHL and af2 serve as low developmental leagues for professional hockey and football, respectively.

At Van Andel Arena in Grand Rapids, Mich., leases for one of the building's 42 private suites average $33,000, said Lynne Ike, the arena's director of marketing. The 12,500-seat arena, which opened in 1996, is home to the American Hockey League's Grand Rapids Griffins and the Arena Football League's Grand Rapids Rampage.

Ike said she has a waiting list of about 50 individuals or companies interested in suite leases.

“I've only had four suites turn over in my six years on the job,” Ike said. “It's been pretty steady since we opened in 1996.”

In addition to about 48 home contests for the Griffins and Rampage, Van Andel houses about 77 other events each year, including ice shows, concerts, Detroit Pistons exhibition games, Michigan State basketball games, professional wrestling shows and college hockey games, Ike said. The Lucas County arena is expected to host 100 to 125 events of that nature each year.

Though lease prices for Van Andel's suites are less than luxury box fees at the new Toledo arena, they do not include tickets for individual events or food and beverage fees.

Ike said event traffic at Van Andel typically slows in summer because many performers book outdoor tours during that period.

The Grand Rapids venue is managed by Philadelphia-based SMG, which was hired earlier this year to manage the new Lucas County arena and the SeaGate Convention Centre.

At the Allen County War Memorial Coliseum in Fort Wayne, Ind., luxury suite leases range in price from $26,000 to $36,000 depending on the length of the agreement and size of the suite. A three-year lease for a 16-person suite costs $30,000. That price jumps to $36,000 for a 26-person suite. Five-, seven- and 10-year leases are also available for the arena's 24 suites.

Lease prices include tickets for all home games for the International Hockey League's Fort Wayne Komets, the NBA Development League's Fort Wayne Mad Ants, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne men's basketball and any future sports franchise.

Tickets for other arena events and food and beverage fees are not included in suite lease prices.

The 12,500-seat arena houses more than 100 events each year, said Shannon Green, the venue's director of premium seating. Green said there is a suite waiting list of about 35 individuals or companies interested in leases.

At Wachovia Arena at Casey Plaza in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., a three-year lease for a luxury suite costs $37,500 per year and includes 12 tickets to two preseason and 40 regular-season games for the arena's AHL franchise, the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins. Wachovia Arena is also home to an af2 franchise.

Prices for luxury suites at Columbus' Nationwide Arena, home to the NHL's Blue Jackets and the Arena Football League's Destroyers, cost considerably more than suite fees in smaller markets. Larry Hoepfner, senior vice president of business operations for the Columbus Blue Jackets, said the average price for one of the arena's 36 luxury suites is about $150,000 annually and includes 12 seats for each of the approximately 150 events that take place there each year. Nationwide Arena has a total of 52 suites, but 16 were sold to major companies in the Columbus area as part of the arena's construction deal, Hoepfner said.

The key to convincing corporations to purchase suite leases is justifying the $150,000 fee with good entertainment, Hoepfner said.

“Our job is to provide as many events as we can for our suite holders,” he said.
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Old October 26th, 2007, 12:54 PM   #1015
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Downtown Arena Development Update No. 2

Suites compete for business elite
By Duane Ramsey
Toledo Free Press Staff Writer
[email protected]


Toledo appears to have avoided a national trend at arenas and stadiums that are having trouble selling corporate suites at sports venues across the country.

The Toledo Mud Hens and the University of Toledo report no trouble selling out their suites to local companies. The real test may come when the Toledo market adds 32 additional suites at the new Downtown arena and renovated Savage Hall in the next two years.

UT has sold out all 44 of the suites at the Glass Bowl since the new press and skybox facility opened in 1990, according to Mike Karabin, senior associate athletic director.

At a cost of $20,000 per season for each suite with 24 tickets and amenities, those suites generate $1 million in revenue annually for the athletic department. The Glass Bowl also has 300 stadium club seats at $1,200 each that contribute to that revenue.

“We have been fortunate to sell suites to both large and small businesses, many that have been with us from the beginning,” Karabin said.

The Mud Hens have a waiting list of 10 to 12 companies for the 29 suites rented at Fifth Third Field. Most of the companies renting suites have five-, 10- or 15-year contracts, signed when the ballpark opened.

“The key to success in Toledo is that we have the university, a public institution, and not-for-profit sports franchises for arena football and hockey. It's not private groups or corporations profiting from that income,” said Joe Napoli, vice president/general manager of the Toledo Mud Hens Baseball Club Inc.

Napoli said he believes local businesses and labor leaders look at their investment from the perspectives of economic impact, quality of life and community relations.

The Mud Hens keep three suites open for rental by companies or persons for individual games at a cost of $1,000 to $1,500 each, which includes $250 for food and beverages. They have reservations for more than 50 of the 200 dates and suites for the 2008 home games, Napoli said.

Name recognition

Fifth Third Bank just completed the sixth season in a 15-year deal for the naming rights to the Downtown ballpark. Three primary reasons led to Fifth Third Bank's decision to invest in the naming rights for Fifth Third Field, according to Karen Fraker, senior vice president for marketing at Fifth Third Bank.

First, the bank believed Downtown development was important to the community. Second, it provided a good source of affordable entertainment for families of the bank's customers and employees.

Also, “the name recognition for the bank has gone far beyond our expectations,” Fraker said. “It has become a destination and an icon in the community.”

The naming of the baseball field in Toledo is not unique for the bank, which also has sponsored Fifth Third Field in Dayton and Fifth Third Park in Grand Rapids, Mich., for minor league baseball teams in those cities.

“It coincides with our company's culture and is supported corporately,” said Fraker. “Our employees are encouraged to become involved in community activities and organizations.”

Fifth Third Bank's corporate suite at Fifth Third Field was not part of the naming package. The company had committed to the suite before negotiating the naming rights.

The bank's business lends itself to using sports events that “provide perfect venues for entertaining customers and interacting with movers and shakers in the community,” Fraker said.

Fifth Third Bank also has suites at the football stadiums at Bowling Green State University and the University of Toledo.

In the past six years, Fifth Third Bank has invested $14 million in community relations, which include the naming rights and suites at the ballpark and stadiums, along with all donations, grants and sponsorships, Fraker said.

Sharing suites

It's not just large companies that use sports suites. Toledo-based AlfaGreen Supreme uses suites at the Glass Bowl and Fifth Third Field to entertain customers without having to worry about the weather conditions and still enjoy the game.

AlfaGreen shares a suite at the Glass Bowl, benefiting from the cost affordability and flexible plans available in the Toledo market compared to major conferences and professional sports teams. The company processes alfalfa by dehydration for use in animal feed and fertilizers at its facility in North Toledo.

OmniSource Corporation of Toledo has leased a full suite at the Glass Bowl for the past eight to 10 years due to the affordability of the entire package. The local metal-recycling firm also has season tickets for UT basketball, Toledo Mud Hens and some of the Detroit pro teams.

“It's a great, relaxed way to entertain customers, and people really enjoy it,” said Doty Hamilton of OmniSource, which has customers in Toledo, Northwest Ohio and Southeast Michigan. “It's been a tremendous asset for us.”

OmniSource doesn't have a suite at Fifth Third Field, but Hamilton said they rent the Roost at individual Mud Hens games for entertaining customers in the family-friendly ballpark.

Hamilton said they will wait and see what the suites cost at the new Downtown arena or Savage Hall before the company considers using them.

Columbia Gas of Ohio shares a suite at Fifth Third Field with two other companies and shares a suite at the Glass Bowl with one other firm.

“We try to be a good corporate citizen for the entire community and support many different charities and organizations with various facets of commitments,” said Chris Kozak, communications and community relations manager for Columbia Gas. Kozak is an occasional Toledo Free Press contributor of arts and sports columns.

Fraker and Kozak said they have been approached about renting suites at the new Downtown arena and renovated Savage Hall. Neither has committed to either location but both are considering their options.

The new arena

Naming rights for the new Downtown arena remain available. Napoli said it has had some interest in the naming rights and is discussing it with parties of interest, which he declined to identify.

Toledo Arena Sports plans to have between 100 and 125 events per year for arena football, hockey, music concerts, motocross and a variety of family shows at the Downtown arena. Napoli said they want to provide a long list of diverse events that will appeal to all age, economic and social groups.

Hockey will return to Toledo at the arena in the fall of 2009 and arena football will run annually from March through July 2010.

The new arena will offer 20 corporate suites with 12 seats in each suite. Leases for the suites will run $40,000 for the sports teams or $55,000 for all events in the arena and will permit sharing of suites by up to three tenants.

“We think it's the right number. We wanted it to balance with the suites in the new Savage Hall, Glass Bowl and Fifth Third Field,” Napoli said. “We were pleasantly surprised by the number of companies interested in the larger package.”

There are companies from the Toledo area that have or share suites in the major league cities of Cleveland and Detroit. Some of those companies also want to support the home teams, said Napoli.

Research shows that people from the 13-county region of Northwest Ohio travel to Detroit, Cleveland or Columbus for sports and entertainment events amounting to $42 million in economic impact.

“We want to capture more of those dollars that have left and keep them here,” Napoli said.

Some businesses have flourished around Fifth Third Field and the SeaGate Centre.

“The arena will create a more vibrant Downtown with more reasons for people to come here. We want Downtown to thrive for the whole region,” Napoli said. “People feel secure and comfortable coming to events in Toledo. People from outside the community have been very complimentary, sharing favorable feelings about their visits to Toledo.”

Neither Napoli nor Karabin isconcerned about competition for suites at the Downtown arena and the new Savage Hall. They agreed that some companies will support both, while others may support the college or professional sports.

The renovated Savage Hall may have a slight advantage because it will open for the 2008 basketball season. The Downtown arena is scheduled to open for the 2009 hockey season.

The new Savage Hall will offer 12 suites at a cost of $30,000 per year. It will also include 17 loge boxes ranging from eight to 18 seats complete with theater-style seating and waitress service similar to the 200 club seats in the Glass Bowl.

Karabin said the location of the suites in the new Savage Hall will be “A-plus, on the sidelines and close to the action.” They will be located across the upper level on the west side of the current arena.

“We already have several commitments for suites,” Karabin said. “It will be the best facility in our league when it's completed.”

Some preliminary work will begin outside this winter. Savage Hall will be vacated next March when the basketball season ends and the construction begins. The new facility is scheduled to open in November 2008 for the basketball season.
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Old October 26th, 2007, 12:56 PM   #1016
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Wal-Mart/North Towne Development Update

Wal-Mart expands in area with three new supercenters
By Duane Ramsey
Toledo Free Press Staff Writer
[email protected]


As Wal-Mart opens three newly renovated stores into supercenters in the Toledo area, the retailer is also looking for a location on the north side of the city, possibly the former Northtowne Mall site, for another hypermarket.
Wal-Mart will hold grand openings for the newly converted supercenters on West Central Avenue and Glendale Avenue in November. The supercenter on Navarre Avenue in Oregon celebrated its grand opening Oct. 17.

The opening of the three supercenters will create an additional 150 jobs per store. Each supercenter employs about 350 people, so Wal-Mart has about 1,100 employees in the Toledo area that includes the store at Spring Meadows in Holland, said Dan Moore, marketing manager for Wal-Mart's Northwest Ohio market.
Wal-Mart will open another supercenter on U.S. 25 in Perrysburg during the first quarter of 2008. The company currently operates 10 locations in its Northwest Ohio market, including stores in Bowling Green, Bryan, Fremont, Napoleon and Wauseon.

Moore said Wal-Mart is looking for the right location for another supercenter on the north side of Toledo after it was unable to secure a desired site in Bedford, Mich. Moore said a northern location could be open in 2010 or 2011.

There are reports Wal-Mart may be interested in the vacant Northtowne Mall site. Ron Mosby, senior manager for public affairs in Ohio for Wal-Mart, would not confirm the company's interest in any specific site.

“We look at every reasonable opportunity to grow on sites that would be easy for our customers,” Mosby said. He declined to comment on whether the Northtowne site meets the company's needs.

At this time, Wal-Mart has made no formal applications or requests with the City of Toledo regarding a site in North Toledo, according to both city council and the mayor's office.

“We will favor any new development in that area that will attract not only shoppers from the immediate vicinity, but will bring in money from Northwest Ohio and Michigan residents, as well,” Toledo Mayor Carty Finkbeiner said.

‘We can do better'

Outgoing City Councilman Joe Birmingham, who represents District 6 where the Northtowne site is located, said he recently met with Mosby and other Wal-Mart officials encouraging them to consider Northtowne for a new supercenter.

“I hope that would be a site they would be interested in. If Wal-Mart can take that vacant site and bring business to that area, I'm all for it,” said Birmingham, who was defeated in the primary election.

Lindsay Webb, the Democratic candidate for Birmingham's seat, is still undecided on her position of a possible Wal-Mart supercenter on the Northtowne site.

“I will vote the conscience of my community,” Webb said.

Webb said she does not support or shop at Wal-Mart. She is a member of the UAW, an employment law specialist and advocate for displaced workers.

“I believe that we can do better than Wal-Mart,” said Webb, noting one of her constituents suggested that The Andersons would be a good retail fit at the Northtowne site.

The Andersons currently is focusing on further developing its specialty food store in Sylvania. A company official said the company will evaluate opportunities for new locations in the market, but did not comment specifically about the Northtowne site.

Webb said she has received phone calls and e-mails with feedback about the subject, but would not comment on their content. She plans to hold at least four public meetings in District 6 to discuss the possible redevelopment of Northtowne and other topics with her constituents.

David Ball, the Green Party candidate for the District 6 seat, also thinks the area can do better than Wal-Mart or another retail store. As the largest Fortune 500 company in the world, Wal-Mart hires mostly part-time employees and doesn't offer health care to them, he said.

“We're focusing on retail and malls when we need to do something to bring in jobs that will invest in the technologies of the future, such as computers, wind and solar energy, to keep more of our students from moving out of Toledo and Northwest Ohio,” Ball said.

Economic impact

Wal-Mart's decision could depend on the rezoning of the Northtowne site. Lakeside Center, which owns the 75-acre site, had it rezoned for light industrial to meet its original redevelopment plan for the parcel. The site would need to be rezoned for commercial-retail to allow Wal-Mart to build a new supercenter on it.

Wal-Mart's supercenters compete with Meijer, which operates stores that also offer food and general merchandise in Maumee, Oregon, Sylvania and Toledo. The Meijer store located on Alexis Road is about one mile east of the Northtowne site.

“The competition Wal-Mart creates among retailers benefits people whether they shop at Wal-Mart or not,” said Mia Masten, director of corporate affairs for Wal-Mart's Midwest region. “At the end of the day, the consumer wins by paying less for what they buy.”

Wal-Mart not only has a significant presence in the Toledo area, but across Ohio. The company employs more than 51,950 people in the state.

The retailer has paid more than $82.4 million in state and local taxes in Ohio and collected more than $410 million in state sales taxes during its 2007 fiscal year.

However, Wal-Mart also has sought to minimize its payment of property taxes by filing more than 2,100 assessment challenges on properties where its stores and warehouses are located.

Based on a national sample of Wal-Mart stores and distribution centers, the company has filed challenges at more than one-third of its locations in the United States, according to Good Jobs First, a non-profit, non-partisan research center in Washington, D.C.

Wal-Mart has filed one challenge in Lucas County asking for a reduction in the assessed value of its store in Oregon from the current market value of $10.5 million to $7 million in 2006. No decision or recommendation has been made on the company's request.

It is not uncommon for large companies to file an “informal,” a request for challenging the assessed values of commercial property, according to the Lucas County Auditor's Office. An auditor considers the construction costs, expenses, income and value of other comparable properties and makes a recommendation.

If the company doesn't agree with the reassessed value, it can appeal to the board of revisions in the auditor's office. The board would render a decision within 60 to 90 days. That ruling can be appealed to the Board of Tax Appeals or Court of Common Pleas.

After Wal-Mart completed the conversion of its store in Bowling Green to a supercenter, the company filed for a reassessment on the site of the original store that is now a parking lot. Currently, the assessed value for that supercenter is $11.1 million, according to the Wood County Auditor's Office.

Good Jobs First reported that Wal-Mart loses more assessment challenges than it wins despite its enormous legal resources. The report also showed that Wal-Mart receives more than $1.2 billion in property tax abatements, income tax credits and sales tax diversions as economic development subsidies where it builds or expands stores.

In fiscal year 2006, Wal-Mart reported it spent nearly $14 billion on merchandise and services from 2,195 suppliers in Ohio. Wal-Mart stores and Sam's Club locations gave $7.4 million in cash and in-kind donations statewide in 2006.

Wal-Mart contributed a total of $25,000 to 10 different organizations in the community with the grand opening in Oregon. Moore said it would contribute similar amounts with the grand openings in November. The company is restoring a soccer field and park near the Glendale store that will be completed next spring at a cost of $56,000, Moore said.

At the same time, the retailer claims to have saved customers in Ohio an average of $2,515 per family by shopping at 141 Wal-Mart stores and 30 Sam's Clubs in 2006.

Wal-Mart recently lowered the price of more than 100 generic prescriptions to $4 each, providing access to drugs for 90 percent of all therapeutic categories. The company claims it has saved customers $350 million since it launched the prescription program.

New research conducted for Wal-Mart by Global Insight, an independent research firm, shows the retailer saves American families an average of $2,500 each year. That number reflects a 7.3 percent increase from $2,329 in 2004, according to the research.

Global Insight updated its original financial analysis of Wal-Mart's national and local impacts in terms of jobs, wages, prices and consumer buying power conducted in 2005.

The updated study confirmed the continued reduction in prices due to the presence of Wal-Mart, and growth in consumer spending from 2004 to 2006 translated directly into savings for consumers of $287 billion in 2006. That total represents savings of $957 per person or $2,500 per U.S. household.

The retailer is tracking the savings so far this year by installing a “savings ticker” outside Wal-Mart's home office in Bentonville, Ark. Wal-Mart claims it has issued 20 percent more price rollbacks in 2007 than last year.
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"HOLY TOLEDO!!!"
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Old October 27th, 2007, 03:34 PM   #1017
ilovetoledo
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Times are a changin...

Fifth Third ready to move into SeaGate

By MARK REITER
BLADE BUSINESS WRITER



The move of Fifth Third Bank into its new digs at the 32-story glass tower on Summit Street will begin this weekend.

About 80 employees who will begin work Monday on the 22nd floor of the former world headquarters of Owens-Illinois Inc. were packing yesterday to have boxes ready for movers, said Karen Fraker, vice president of marketing for Fifth Third.

The first phase in transferring banking operations into what is to be called Fifth Third Center at One SeaGate involves employees in the banking and mortgage division in the bank's
17-story office building at Madison Avenue and Huron Street and the investment advisory group at a facility it owns on Monroe Street in Sylvania Township.

When the move is finished in early December, about 300 employees will be in 110,000 square feet of office space on four floors of the glass-and-steel structure.

The century-old building at Madison and Huron has been the headquarters for Fifth Third's northwest Ohio region and its predecessors since 1931. A bank branch on the first floor of the building will remain.

The bank is looking for buyers for the 5520 Monroe St. site, although the bank branch and investment staff will stay at that location.

The bank opened a branch on the first floor of the One SeaGate building this month. The first of four signs that will adorn the top of the building have been installed. The remaining signs will be installed next month.

Considered downtown's premier office spot, it was the home for 25 years of glass-maker Owens-Illinois, which moved from the downtown for new headquarters in Perrysburg.

The 800,000-square-foot structure was sold in August for $40 million to New York-based Amtrust Realty Corp., an investment group that has gained a reputation for turning around underperforming properties. The new owner has retained CB Richard Ellis/Reichle Klein to market the site.

The addition of the Fifth Third office staff will increase the building's occupancy to 50 percent, said Jeremy Miller, a real estate agent for the Maumee firm.

The Collaborative Inc., a Toledo architectural firm, has been hired by Amtrust Realty to redesign the sublevel of the building, he said.
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Old October 27th, 2007, 09:41 PM   #1018
Pilliod Njaim
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^Collaborative Inc. is an amazing company. They've done lots of work at Ohio University, and I've been very impressed. They're top of their game in Ohio.
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Old October 28th, 2007, 03:31 AM   #1019
toledo25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonjourtoledo View Post
Here are several things that we need downtown:

1) Video Store (Blockbuster) that is open until midnight 7 days a week
2) Book Store (Books-A-Million or Borders) that is open until 11pm 7 days a week
3) Coffeehouse (Starbuck's or Caribou Coffee) that is open until midnight 7 days a week
4) Scrambler's Marie that is open 7 days a week
5) FedEx Kinko's 24/7
6) Walgreen's with Pharmacy 24/7
7) Radio Shack that is open 6-7 days a week
8) Panera Bread that is open 7 days a week until 11pm
9) Full-scale grocery store to occupy the former Superior Antique at Erie Street Market that is open open 7 days a week
10) A second shop of Wixey Bakery open 5-6 days a week
11) Chipolte that is open 7 days a week until midnight
12) Meats & More open 5-6 days a week
13) GNC store open 5-6 days a week
14) Monnette's Produce Market open 7 days a week
15) Hardware Store (either ACE or True Value) open 7 days a week
16) Ben Franklin Store open 7 days a week
17) Veternarian clinic with boarding & grooming open 5-6 days a week

and last but not least,

17) Fitness Center with sauna open 7 days a week until midnight
I AGREE 100% If those things existed downtown my partner and I would have bought a space downtown instead of West Toledo, but we love our house now so getting us to sell and move to downtown might not work hehe
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Old October 30th, 2007, 02:29 AM   #1020
ilovetoledo
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Ideas on Downtown

Here are some ideas for a better downtown:
I was thinking a better welcoming section into downtown from the AW trail. Better than a billboard. Possibly a wall and on it "Welcome to Downtown Toledo" an a fountain in front. I was thinking close to the shoreline by the downtown side of the river we could have lights in the water shineing up on the sky line. How cool would that look haveing lights shine out of the water or maybe a fountain in front of downtown with lights at night shineing on it?? New streetscape lights. Maumee in their downtown have their own type of lights that set downtown Maumee apart from the city. If anyway needs to be fixed it would be the AW trail comming into downtown. I think they should fix this because this is considered the red carpet leading into downtown. Who wants a rough ride on the way there. Does anyone know what is going on with the triangle building upon entrance into downtown from the trail or the steam plant--why is this taking so long?
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