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Old March 6th, 2010, 01:36 AM   #1
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Improving the TTC

I wonder what the TTC management is doing if they are learning from Philly. Clearly they are incompetent.

Quote:
TTC learning from Philly's transit revival
U.S. city offers lessons on how to turn around a system plagued with problems, rider complaints

Published On Fri Mar 05 2010

Tess Kalinowski Transportation Reporter


Complaints about old-fashioned tokens, dirty stations and surly service aren't unique to the TTC.

Officials at Philadelphia's SEPTA (Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority) system were hearing them long before Torontonians began publishing pictures of sleeping subway collectors.

But when Joe Casey became general manager of SEPTA two years ago, he decided it was time riders knew their gripes had been heard by those at the top of the system, which includes regional rail similar to GO Transit, as well as buses, trolleys and a subway.

Casey's innovations – from making information kiosks more visible in stations to creating "quiet cars" on the regional rail – have transformed some of SEPTA's harshest critics into constructive allies.

"Communication, cleanliness, convenience and courtesy – those were the areas that our customers ranked us as lower in our customer surveys," he said.

Toronto officials, plagued with similar complaints, have been in touch with Philadelphia in their search for solutions, said Gary Webster, the TTC's chief general manager.

To transform SEPTA's culture, Casey named a general manager of customer service, Kim Heinle, who has a background in the hospitality industry. They introduced weekly classes in customer service for transit workers.

The system still gets just as many complaints – and Casey admits it's hard to gauge the success of that program. But on the other side of the equation, in two years, customer commendations have doubled.

SEPTA tries to follow up with customers on complaints and compliments within two days. Employees receive gift cards as rewards for good service. Managers also regularly visit train and bus stations to survey customer satisfaction.

Administrators assist on the front lines during service disruptions, and everyone's job review has a customer-service performance goal. Even retirees have been tapped to help assist riders at major community events.

SEPTA is also introducing some of the technology the TTC is trying to expedite in the wake of its recent troubles, including next-bus-arrival notifications. A proposal for a smart fare card is expected to roll out in the spring.

"Joe (Casey) is a commuter. He's ridden the railroad for years so he sees the system from a commuter's perspective," said Matthew Mitchell of the Delaware Valley Association of Rail Passengers. The group, which lobbies for transit funding and accessible service, used to have a more adversarial relationship with SEPTA.

Although the group is still critical, Mitchell says, "We don't have to make a public stink about things to get action."

When he got the job, Casey said he was going to clean up the system. Before a single cleaner had been deployed, people were congratulating him on the improvement.

"We had a negative image before I took over," he said. "That's slowly changing, but a lot of it is image."
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/ttc/...t-revival?bn=1
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Old March 12th, 2010, 10:01 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Skybean View Post
I wonder what the TTC management is doing if they are learning from Philly. Clearly they are incompetent.



http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/ttc/...t-revival?bn=1
They are further ahead than Toronto is. No shame in learning from someone who is a little bit ahead of you.

Cheers, m
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Old March 13th, 2010, 12:14 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by allurban View Post
They are further ahead than Toronto is. No shame in learning from someone who is a little bit ahead of you.

Cheers, m
What does that even mean? Ahead in what?
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Old March 25th, 2010, 04:31 AM   #4
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TTC plans suicide barriers on Yonge line
It’s unclear how cost, up to $10 million per station, will be paid
Published On Wed Mar 24 2010




Singapore provides an example of how subway screen doors work. Many of the Singapore subway's platforms are walled in with glass enclosures. Trains stop precisely at the platform doors, and both doors then open. This keeps the station cleaner and quieter and safe from suicide attempts.
Chris So/Toronto Star
Tess Kalinowski Transportation Reporter

The TTC wants to install suicide barriers on its subway platforms, possibly within three or four years at some stations.

Councillors on the transit commission recommended Wednesday that the barriers, known as platform screen doors, be added to the capital budget between 2011 and 2015.

But with the TTC anticipating a $1.5 billion capital shortfall by the end of the decade, the cost of up to $10 million per station has no funding yet.

“Anything that would add to the capital shortfall would be the responsibility of the province and the city to cover,” said TTC chair Adam Giambrone.

Platform screen doors are in use on subways around the world, including London, Paris, Barcelona, Hong Kong and Rome, according to a TTC report.

The platform doors must line up precisely with the train doors, something that can’t be done manually but will be possible once the TTC installs its new computerized signaling system, called automatic train control.

The first phase, from Eglinton to Union, won’t be complete until 2013, and it will be 2015 before it is installed all the way to Downsview.

As well as suicide and accident prevention, the barriers would permit trains to move faster, stop people from jamming the doors and keep garbage from falling to the tracks, where it sometimes catches fire and causes delays.

The TTC reported 18 suicide attempts last year, 77 incidents of unauthorized people going down to track level, and 14 accidental falls.

“Suicide is an illness and it is not something within the person’s control. Anything they can do to prevent suicide is going to save lives, and I think they have a responsibility to do that since the technology exists,” said barrier advocate Lindsay Hill, a lawyer, wife and mother who has personally suffered from mental illness. “Sometimes you walk down to the platform and you hear the silence and you hear the rushing wind, and that calls to you,” she told the commission.

TTC vice-chair Joe Mihevc said the commission will need mental health advocates to support the call for provincial and federal funds to pay for the barriers.

The TTC has an awareness program to help employees spot people who may be in distress on the system.
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/tran...onge-line?bn=1
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Old March 25th, 2010, 09:01 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by ale26 View Post
What does that even mean? Ahead in what?
further ahead in fixing their customer service problems.

Because they have actually started doing something...while ttc has barely gotten themselves past 'denial'

Cheers, m
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Old April 12th, 2010, 04:46 AM   #6
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Quote:
TTC listens as riders vent
‘Operators do slack off a lot,’ TTC employee says
Published On Sun Apr 11 2010




Tess Kalinowski Transportation Reporter

Anger brought them together.

But when the TTC's union met face-to-face with riders at a town hall Sunday, there were few signs of the animosity that badly strained riders' relationship with frontline transit workers a couple of months back.

The first of three meetings organized by the transit workers' union proved that “the frustration we've been hearing about over the last few months isn't necessarily directed only at the frontline employees,” said Bob Kinnear, president of Local 113 of the Amalgamated Transit Union.

“Yes there have been disappointing incidences, which the union does not condone in any way. But I think there's been some clarity that it's the underlying issues with service and lack thereof that more important issues,” he said.

The meetings were organized when anger at transit workers boiled over earlier this year. Already annoyed by a fare hike and token shortages, riders were outraged by published photos of a sleeping subway collector and video of a bus driver taking an unauthorized coffee break.

The 480-seat auditorium at Downsview Secondary School was more than half full as riders waited turns at the microphone to ask about why buses and streetcars don't arrive on schedule and why, after a long wait, they turn up in bunches.

They wanted to know:

• Who ordered new buses with a step up to the back so that strollers block access to the rear?

• Why doesn't the TTC order people to take off bulky backpacks?

• Why don't fare vending machines work?

• And why do buses seem to pull away when drivers can see someone running toward them?

The union spokespeople on the panel moderated by talk radio host John Tory, were apologetic.

The normally defiant Kinnear, who had earlier this year warned riders against abusing drivers and threatening to take transit workers' pictures, acknowledged that his members had a role to play in the customer service crisis.

He started the meeting by recalling his own frustration as a subway collector when a rider seeking directions couldn't understand what he was being told through the speaker.

Kinnear said he opened the door to his booth and pointed to a sign.

“Can't you read?” he asked the rider.

Kinnear said he's never forgotten the customer's apology because he couldn't read.

“We can take some responsibility for the dissatisfaction of frontline customer service,” he conceded.

“Operators do slack off a lot,” driver John Bethune told the audience, later stressing, “I didn't say anything that wasn't true.”


“TTC management need to go back to train us so we can do the job properly,” panelist and driver Anthony Wallace said after the meeting. “We need to make sure we serve the public to the best of our ability.”

While riders praised the union for organizing the meeting, several said they were frustrated because TTC management wasn't allowed to respond to many of the broader queries.

“It would have been a more productive meeting,” said Wilson bus rider Claudette Passby.

“The union leader is good at taking responsibility. But the union leader is not the one who should be up on the stage,” she said.

“I was looking for more about why more funding is not put into (the TTC), and why we don't have a better fare system,” said Carrie McLean, whose brother is a TTC worker.

She says the TTC's old-fashioned fare system should be replaced by the kind of smartcards available on other major transit systems such as London and Hong Kong.


“It was a waste of time for me to come. Management should have been up there because there's a big problem,” said McLean.

But Tory Moote, who attended the town hall with two friends from York University, said the threesome plan to go to the other meetings scheduled in the coming weeks because they want to hear more discussion of broader issues such as transit funding.

“We're angry and we want to ride the TTC. We don't want to drive,” said Alex, who didn't want her last name used. “These are all on the periphery of what's going on. Where's our money going? Why are a third of TTC employees being paid over $100,000?”

Senior TTC officials were on hand, however, to listen to rider comments.

The information will be considered along with other customer service initiatives underway at the TTC, including an expert panel that will be making recommendations for improvements in June, said chief general manager Gary Webster.

The public will have an opportunity to ask managers questions later, said Giambrone.

“What's exciting is you're beginning that dialogue,” he said. “It was frustrating for me because there were some answers I was wanting to give and talk about. There's some questions that might be better answered by TTC management and the commission. The customer service panel will be making an announcement over the coming weeks about their own customer engagement.”

But those events will not be in competition with the union-sponsored meetings, he said.

Prior to Sunday's event Kinnear said that he didn't know how many people to expect. The cafeteria next to the auditorium had been opened up with fruit and beverages prepared for those who might have to watch the meeting on monitors. But in the end, only a few TTC workers sat and watched there and the refreshments were packed away.

The session did, however, run overtime, with Tory allowing questions to continue for more than 30 minutes after a cable broadcast was scheduled to end.

Another town hall takes place on Sunday in Scarborough and in May 2 at Ryerson University. Information and other queries and comments can be directed to the union's website at wemovetoronto.ca.
Quote:

Audience nuggets:


Riders who attended the transit workers' union open house Sunday at Downsview Secondary School were equipped with clickers so the audience could be immediately polled on transit concerns.

Among the results:

• 32 per cent said their commute required riding on three TTC vehicles;

• 31 per cent said they had regularly seen avoidable cases of poor customer service by frontline transit workers in the last two or three years;

• 31 per cent said they had occasionally seen poor customer service within the last two or three years;

• 95 per cent answered “yes” when asked if TTC technology is out of date;


• 60 per cent answered “yes” when asked if they had experienced problems such as broken vending machines on the TTC;

• 75 per cent said they had seen TTC employees being threated or abused;

• 44 per cent said they strongly agree or agree with paying tolls or other taxes if the money was devoted to improving transit; 42 per cent disagreed or strongly disagreed;

• 63 per cent agreed or strongly agreed that there is a problem with the way strollers are handled on the TTC;

• 59 per cent said they were frustrated by bunching of buses and streetcars;

• 42 per cent of the audience said they were regular TTC users.
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/ttc/...ders-vent?bn=1
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Old April 12th, 2010, 05:37 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Skybean View Post
95 per cent answered “yes” when asked if TTC technology is out of date;
Followed by:

100 per cent answered "no" when asked if they would accept a large fare increase or sales tax increase to cover the cost of updating TTC technology


I too would have said yes to that question but there are only a few items I believe are worth the cost of the upgrade, and those are entirely capacity related (ATC and similar).
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Old April 12th, 2010, 07:11 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by rbt View Post
Followed by:

100 per cent answered "no" when asked if they would accept a large fare increase or sales tax increase to cover the cost of updating TTC technology


I too would have said yes to that question but there are only a few items I believe are worth the cost of the upgrade, and those are entirely capacity related (ATC and similar).
Automatic Train Control isn't really an upgrade because the trains and signal system have to be replaced anyway. Leaving out ATC on either the vehicles or the signal system replacements has almost no impact on cost. It's really a state of good repair item. If the signal system wasn't at the end of its service life - which it is after over 55 years on the oldest parts of the system - the TTC probably wouldn't be bothering with ATC as it would have been too expensive.
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Old April 13th, 2010, 11:52 AM   #9
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Fun with Town Hall Sessions

They wanted to know:
Quote:
• Who ordered new buses with a step up to the back so that strollers block access to the rear?
What to do? All buses are like this now except the lousy Orion VI - do you want the Orion VI back?

Quote:
• Why doesn't the TTC order people to take off bulky backpacks?
Because we arent the backpack police. Besides, they should try having signs and taking to the schoolkids first.

Quote:
• Why don't fare vending machines work?
Because you keep on kicking them

Quote:
• And why do buses seem to pull away when drivers can see someone running toward them?
There are a few possible reasons for this--pick the one you hate the least:

a) The driver cannot see you because he or she is in the process of checking traffic and mirrors and getting ready to move a 12000kg bus

b) because the driver has noticed you but doesnt care

c) because if the driver picks you up they will be off schedule and other people + supervisors will complain - following Mr. Spock's principle of "the good of the many outweighs the good of the few, or the one."

d) because the driver wants to piss you off so you will come to this session and complain to the Union, thinking that you are complaining to Management

Cheers, m

ps all of the above is in good fun - but I think that there should be a courtesy campaign in schools and in TTC vehicles & stations about how to carry your backpack on the TTC.
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Old April 19th, 2010, 02:11 AM   #10
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This picture is just gold!

Quote:
Louder crowd, a call for Giambrone's head at TTC town hall
Published 46 minutes ago


TTC Chair Adam Giambrone reflects as transit rider Mai Cheng, 72, demands his resignation at a town hall meeting Sunday. The meeting was the second of three sessions sponsored by the transit union to hear from riders.


Tess Kalinowski Transportation Reporter

Their numbers were similar to last week’s transit workers union town hall designed to foster better relations between frontline TTC workers and riders, but Sunday’s crowd of about 200 transit riders at a Scarborough high school were more vocal and more confrontational.

Although there were some questions about how the transit system works — or doesn’t work — riders were focused this week on the behaviour of transit workers rather than individual bus routes or personal issues with the TTC.

Those who attended the second in the series of union-organized meetings at Stephen Leacock Collegiate Institute wanted to know why some drivers and collectors behave rudely, take breaks while passengers sit on the bus, apply some of the rules inconsistently and why the system is so dirty.

Several objected loudly to the format of the meeting.

“Throughout this meeting your answers have been taking over our questions,” said Ryan Endoh, who came with a prepared statement complaining about the “profane language” and “gross indifference” he had experienced on the system.

Questions and comments from the audience were confined to a minute, while panelists and TTC union head Bob Kinnear were taking four minutes to respond, he said.

Endoh told the auditorium about being verbally assaulted by a transit worker when he tried once to explain that he didn’t have his student pass because he had been ill and taken to the hospital.

For the second week, the panel of TTC drivers on the stage, were quick to apologize for the rude behaviour of some of their co-workers.

Nine out of 10 times when a passenger pleasantly explains they haven’t got the correct fare, driver Laverne Snagg said she lets the person on without argument.

She encouraged riders to note the bus number, the route and time and complain to the TTC when they encounter similar situations.

“We are reprimanded. It is normally addressed,” she said.

“Are drivers allowed extended breaks when there are people on board?” said Venesse Lewis, who compared rider frustration in such incidents to the bus arriving 20 minutes late.

She too was frustrated by the format of the two-hour meeting in which only people whose names were drawn from a box by the meeting moderator were allowed to speak.

“I wish more people were able to say things,” said Lewis.

York University graduate student Leia Toledo wanted to know if drivers have access to anger management.

They do but everybody has bad days, she was told.

After the meeting, Toledo said the exercise was valuable but riders have to demand a follow-up meeting with a report on what’s changed on the TTC.

Last week a TTC driver was charged following a dispute with a passenger over an allegedly unpaid fare.

While several speakers thanked the union for the opportunity to gather, one woman complained that it should have been organized by TTC management.

She drew applause for calling for the firing of TTC chair Adam Giambrone, who was sitting nearby.

Although he maintained a cordial approach to riders in the room, union president Bob Kinnear used the meeting to take some shots at TTC management, saying that an automated signalling system on the subway is responsible for large overtime bills.

A recent proposal to install platform edge doors that would prevent people from jumping or falling on the tracks is more about justifying the signal system, said Kinnear.

“Overtime rates have gone through the roof because trains are late. Operators are forced to go beyond their schedules every day,” he said, noting when that happens the worker gets double time.

“Maybe next time we’ll have to negotiate triple time,” he said.

TTC chief general manager Gary Webster, who was in the audience, later denied that the signalling system called speed control was responsible for climbing overtime.

“(Speed control) has been in operation on the Sheppard line. It’s not working properly. We have not put it in place on the other two lines. There’s no question we’ve struggled with the reliability of speed control and we’re not going to work it until we can get it to run properly,” said Webster.

But that has no bearing on the new automatic train control signalling system being installed on the Yonge line in the next four or five years, he said.

In the morning rush hour, the Yonge subway is at capacity, said Webster. “Automatic train control will deal with that,” and new subway trains coming later this year will also help.

Speed control, which cost about $15 million, was introduced on Sheppard in the last two years. Automatic train control is a $300 million system.

One rider complained about a driver’s failure to take a valid transfer when it was proffered.

“I don’t touch the transfers either,” said Jeff Gill, a driver on the union panel. “You see people coming up the steps with the transfer in their mouth. I don’t want that in my hand. There are too many communicable diseases.”

Some complained that not all drivers and collectors required seniors and students to show their passes.

“There are major inconsistencies out there with the enforcement of fares because it’s a judgement call (by individual transit workers),” said Kinnear.

When one rider complained that TTC patrons have to pay to park at stations, while GO passengers park for free, Kinnear suggested that the parking fees introduced last year are an attempt to penalize commuters from the 905 communities around Toronto.

“There needs to be a recognition that people are utilizing our service — the cost is absorbed solely by Torontonians,” he said.

A third town hall takes place May 2 in Etobicoke. Details and an opportunity to comment are available on the union’s website, wemovetoronto.ca.

Meantime, the TTC’s external panel of customer service experts is also hosting a series of meet-and-greet sessions in the subway system starting later this months in advance of the recommendations it will be delivering to improve customer satisfaction.

The outreach efforts by the union and the commission follow a rash of bad publicity on the system that started with the announcement of a fare hike late last year. That was followed by token hoarding and shortages and then widespread images of a sleeping subway collector and video of a driver taking an unauthorized break while riders cooled their heels on the bus.

“There’s a latent demand,” said Webster. “The public wants to talk to us. Management, union, we all need to get out and engage the public more.”
Quote:
Quick Fax

An electronic audience response system in the transit union town hall, allows organizers to almost instantly guage riders’ concerns. Here are some of the results from Sunday’s meeting.

• 49 per cent of the audience were regular TTC users, with an additional 11 per cent using the TTC to get to school

• 49 per cent of the audience at the Stephen Leacock Collegiate meeting took the TTC to get there

• 41 per cent of those at the meeting use two TTC vehicles and 23 per cent used three in their normal commute

• 66 per cent said they had used another transit system in the last couple of years and 54 per cent of those riders said the other system was better than the TTC

• 53 per cent of riders at th meeting said they have seen cases of unsatisfactory customer service by transit workers that was avoidable in the last two or three years on the TTC

• 65 per cent of the audience said their jobs require them to interact face-to-face with the public

• 37 per cent of the riders said drivers should always enforce fare payment and 57 per cent said enforcement should be based on individual circumstances

• 62 per cent said the operators should be allowed to decide whether to allow an adult to ride the TTC if they haven’t paid the correct fare

• 57 per cent said food and drink should be banned on the TTC
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/ttc/...town-hall?bn=1
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Last edited by Skybean; April 19th, 2010 at 02:18 AM.
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Old April 20th, 2010, 02:43 PM   #11
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Is he sleeping, shaking his head, or trying to handle the absurdity of it all?

Quote:
• 65 per cent of the audience said their jobs require them to interact face-to-face with the public

• 37 per cent of the riders said drivers should always enforce fare payment and 57 per cent said enforcement should be based on individual circumstances

• 62 per cent said the operators should be allowed to decide whether to allow an adult to ride the TTC if they haven’t paid the correct fare

• 57 per cent said food and drink should be banned on the TTC
Unbelievable...thought most of these would be pretty obvious one way or the other.

62 % said operators should be allowed to decide wether to let an adult ride the ttc if they hadnt paid the correct fare....
57 % said enforcement should be based on individual circumstances - wtf?

Cheers, m
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Old April 21st, 2010, 06:48 AM   #12
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While I have seen drivers taking unscheduled coffee breaks, there are also many very good drivers. Today, the driver of the bus I was on helped look for a lost wallet and assisted a tourist couple who didn't know how to go to their destination. I think the bigger concern is the overall (lack of) maintenance of stations. Frequently I have seen escalators down for months, drifting garbage causing fire on the tracks and leaking stations.

Quote:
TTC commuters can't stand rude, crude staff
Published On Mon Apr 19 2010

Robyn Doolittle Urban Affairs Bureau


A driver who refuses to move the bus because a baby is crying on board. A streetcar operator referred to by at least one rider as the “Blonde Dragon.” A toll collector who calls a customer “brain dead” when asked for change.

On Monday, the TTC released hundreds of customer complaints to the Star through a freedom of information request.

Page after page, the stories are similar: Drivers throwing tantrums when people don’t shuffle to the back fast enough. Collectors doing crosswords while ignoring customer questions. Drivers shouting at riders and swearing at passing cars.

It seems poor people skills, not delays or fare disputes, are the main concern for transit customers.

Riders say they are verbally abused and harassed by TTC staff on a daily basis. In the most extreme of allegations, some claim to have been victims of sexual advances and racism.

The vast majority of the more than 300 written complaints obtained by the Star — among more than 2,000 lodged last year — paint a picture of a transit system troubled by a culture of indifference and disdain towards customers.

“In my honest opinion, I believe those issues happen. I have no doubt,” said Steven O’Brien, the hotelier tasked with rescuing the TTC’s reputation through a recently created customer service advisory panel. “I’m not condoning the behaviour. (For some) it’s the culture. And you can’t change culture overnight.”

But the TTC is banking on his ability to help change it eventually.

In February, O’Brien was named chair of the new panel, an initiative meant to defuse mounting tensions between the public and its transit system.

Things came to a head in January, two months after the TTC announced a 25-cent fare hike, when a photo of a fare collector sleeping on the job went viral. “Yup, love how my TTC dollars R being spent” said the Twitpic caption. Next, a video surfaced of a bus driver who left late-night riders twiddling their thumbs while he took an unauthorized break at a coffee shop to use the washroom, then buy a drink.

Over the past two weeks, hundreds of riders have shown up at union-sponsored town hall meetings to vent their frustrations. And by the end of June, O’Brien’s independent panel hopes to release a comprehensive customer relations evaluation.

The system needs it.

Last year, the TTC received roughly 2,000 written complaints through traditional mail, email, and online complaint forms. The Star requested a sample of these letters from February, July and October. The majority, about 250 of the 312 complaints we received, were submitted online.

The identities of the riders and employees were protected and, for privacy reasons, the TTC said it cannot disclose what action, if any, came of the individual grievances.

“This morning,” one letter began, “I boarded the #113 bus at Corvet ... At the next stop … another bus was parked with a flashing light. Riders who were on that bus got on to our bus all complaining that they were waiting 20 minutes because the driver refused to move the bus as a baby on board was crying ...

“Passengers continued to vent about the situation on the last bus. At the next stop our operator asked the passengers who came on at the last stop and were discussing the crying baby issue to please leave the bus … It seemed that no one had a right to condemn his colleague in his presence.”

In another letter, a rider writes: “On several occasions I have had the misfortune of boarding (the streetcar) only to realize that the driver for the first leg of my journey to work is this miserable woman . . . (I have) witnessed her verbally kick a paying passenger off this eastbound route . . . for calling her rude, which she IS consistently.”

On this January morning, the rider continues, “I became the target of her vileness … I always try to be courteous and exit via the rear doors (but) my position on the car this morning had me directly beside the front door, so I decided to exit via this way instead of pushing my way through other passengers. Well I guess this made her day because it allowed her the opportunity to yell … she yelled at the top of her lungs four times ... “EXIT AT THE REAR DOOOOORS!!! …

“I turned around and calmly asked her, “Why are you such a bitch to the passengers?” Her loud reply: BECAUSE I ENJOY IT!!!
... I do have to say that the majority of the TTC employees I encounter on a daily basis are courteous and a good number of them are downright friendly. What a delight! But not the Blonde Dragon!”

TTC spokesperson Brad Ross said whenever there is identifiable information, such as specific incident times, route and bus numbers, or employee badge numbers, the complaints are investigated.

A range of responses is available, from a verbal warning to a note in a personnel file or even suspension.

“Just remember there are two sides to every story,” said Ross. “Certainly we don’t condone rudeness or curtness. Certainly our expectation is that employees greet customers with a smile, and thank them for their fare. (But remember), not every customer is polite, either.”
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/ttc/...de-crude-staff
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Old March 1st, 2013, 07:18 AM   #13
Gil
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I figure rather than start a new thread I'd revive a somewhat appropriate one. The TTC unveiled it's new design for their surface stops. The update also includes some new local London-style spider maps to replace the system map, which have come to mixed reviews online. The stops are being tested on the 94 WELLESLEY route.





You can consult the other discussions and more images:
From the TTC who are taking suggestions and comments!
Steve Munro
Chris Bateman from BlogTO
Steve Kupferman from Torontoist
Sean Marshall from Spacing Toronto

It was also recently announced that the TTC would, as part of its Customer Charter would be redesigning the system map coinciding with the November edition of the Ride Guide "that will be easier to read and provide better and clearer information".
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Old March 1st, 2013, 08:32 AM   #14
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I just visited London for the first time last week; my friends and I loved the spider style, local signs. They are much more useful than a full map IMO.
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Old March 8th, 2013, 06:30 AM   #15
Gil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matt.ryerson92 View Post
I just visited London for the first time last week; my friends and I loved the spider style, local signs. They are much more useful than a full map IMO.
The critique of the spider maps was that unlike London, Toronto routes for the most part runs on a grid, making it less important to know the details about where the bus goes. Transfer points to other routes or parallel routes in the event of a detour are probably more important to the rider.

Simply copying an idea without the proper context is rather
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Old March 9th, 2013, 07:22 PM   #16
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I think Metrolink's sounds alot better then TTC. TTC gotten old and stale, it's time for a change. A new name logo and colours would also brighten up transit around here.
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Old March 12th, 2013, 04:27 AM   #17
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Indeed, Mississauga Transit recently changed it's name to MiWay, changed its logo and colours, and its ridership has skyrocketed ever since.
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Old March 12th, 2013, 08:02 AM   #18
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Quote:
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Indeed, Mississauga Transit recently changed it's name to MiWay, changed its logo and colours, and its ridership has skyrocketed ever since.
See.
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Old March 13th, 2013, 05:17 AM   #19
ONE HUMAN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doady View Post
Indeed, Mississauga Transit recently changed it's name to MiWay, changed its logo and colours, and its ridership has skyrocketed ever since.
Please tell me you said that tongue-in-cheek (which may have been misunderstood by some forumers).
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Old March 13th, 2013, 07:43 AM   #20
Taller, Better
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OEincorparated View Post
I think Metrolink's sounds alot better then TTC. TTC gotten old and stale, it's time for a change. A new name logo and colours would also brighten up transit around here.
Oh, yes. "Metrolink" has that 1980's blandly generic "any-city-in-the-world" soundbite that we really want to strive for.
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