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Old August 16th, 2005, 08:53 AM   #1
lowcostgeography
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What ever happend with the Burrard Bridge bike thing?

I know there was another thread about this subject but i couldnt find it. Whatever happened to that plan to convert two of the lanes on the burrard bridge to bike lanes? did it just fall apart? are you enduring it now? is it still slated for the future? that had to be the stupidest thing i have heard a city council approve (no offence to bike riders...but come on, i mean...jesus) anyway...id be interested to hear about that one.
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Old August 16th, 2005, 05:44 PM   #2
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It was approved and is being put into place sometime next year I think. It is stupid because there is no other bike infrastructure, the council should build that first. It will be an inconvenience to drivers but most people have no reason to drive a car over the Burrard street bridge because it serves people on the westside who are well served by transit.
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Old August 16th, 2005, 07:54 PM   #3
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^Most drivers have no reason to drive a car over the Burrard Bridge? I don't live on the Westside, but I've driven over the Burrard Bridge many times, and I always had a good reason. I think this plan is destined to cause traffic backups, and doesn't seem too great at all.
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Old August 16th, 2005, 08:47 PM   #4
lowcostgeography
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I agree that most of those people are well served by transit, but I dont think that most of them ride it. That bridge gets some heavy traffic. I lived on the westside and I drove across that bridge many times, often with no good reason. What exactly do you mean by bike infrastucture? Like those bike specific streets? I just dont think that that many people ride bikes. A better plan, though a much bigger pain in the ass would be to take one lane from Burrard and one from Cambie and do that weird directional change thing with the odd one like they do on the Lions Gate bridge
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Old August 16th, 2005, 11:39 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lowcostgeography
Whatever happened to that plan to convert two of the lanes on the burrard bridge to bike lanes? is it still slated for the future?
Commencement Date: April 1, 2006 (April Fool's Day)

[Municipal Election Date: November, 2005]
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Old August 17th, 2005, 01:21 AM   #6
lowcostgeography
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how many people believe that this will actually happen? It seems a little far-fetched to me (like that proposal to outlaw car alarms within the city limits that never went anywhere)
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Old August 22nd, 2005, 12:21 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lowcostgeography
A better plan, though a much bigger pain in the ass would be to take one lane from Burrard and one from Cambie and do that weird directional change thing with the odd one like they do on the Lions Gate bridge
good idea, except one lane for cars can accomidate 2 bike lanes, so the cambie bridge would not have to change. or they could make hov lanes that allow bikes and other non polluting forms of transportation, such as my personal favorite, longboard
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Old August 22nd, 2005, 12:34 AM   #8
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They are waiting till after the civic election, and then we will find out what they are going to do. This is similar with a lot of other issues, basically city hall is stagnant right now. I am really going to miss Larry; he was the most moderate politician in Vancouver. He kept a lot of those nuts in there place.
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Old September 15th, 2005, 07:44 PM   #9
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Plan to create Burrard bike lanes not yet a done deal
Council votes to hold more hearings on plan for the bridge before it takes effect in April


Frances Bula
Vancouver Sun

Thursday, September 15, 2005

VANCOUVER - The public will get one more kick at commenting on the controversial plan to dedicate two lanes of the Burrard Bridge for cycling commuters -- but not until after the November civic election.

That has some opponents hoping the move opens the door to killing the plan completely, while others say it's one more pointless consultation, aimed at distracting voters, in a process that has gone on for a decade.

Coun. Jim Green, a mayoral candidate, proposed Tuesday that the public get a chance to comment on the plans the city develops over the next six months for the bike-lane experiment, which is due to start in April.

Green, saying there has been a lot of misinformation about the plan and how it will work, got unanimous support from city council for his suggestion.

It would mean the council of the day, which will in all certainty be different after the November election, can decide whether to go ahead with the experiment or abandon it and proceed directly to the option of widening the bridge.

Coun. Sam Sullivan of the Non-Partisan Association, who is also hoping to run for mayor in November, said Green's proposal is "just a way to distract people from their true intention of closing the bridge."

Sullivan said he wished that "Green would have the guts" to run the bike-lane experiment before the election, so the public could give him some real input.

The city's third mayoral hopeful, Christy Clark, said she thinks it might actually be a hopeful move, as it appears to open the door for a future council to reconsider the decision.

"And if that's the effect, I'm in favour," she said, adding that she thinks the experiment is a questionable one that is driven by ideology, not common sense.

And the spokesman for a downtown business group that has raised many concerns about the plan to "close two lanes for five per cent of commuters" said this new round of consultations seems pointless.

"I don't understand why we would go all through this again, except to polarize the stakeholders," said Charles Gauthier, executive director of the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association.

Cyclists and transportation advocacy groups have been in favour of the experiment, which they say would only take away two lanes of bridge traffic from 18 total lanes on the three bridges that cross False Creek.

The Coalition of Progressive Electors and Vision Vancouver councillors supporting it point out it is only a year-long trial taking place while the engineering department also works on the plan to widen the bridge.

If it turns out that commuters can adapt to the dedicated bike lanes, then the city could go with that option and save the $13-million cost of widening the bridge, they say.

Gerry Dobrovolny, the assistant city engineer in charge of organizing the bike-lane experiment, said that commuters do adapt to changes in transportation, but it takes time.

His department is already being bombarded with complaints about the proposed experiment -- a topic he says has generated more public feedback than anything else the engineering department has ever done.

Dobrovolny and his staff are planning to collect data on existing commute times to downtown, levels of commuter traffic by car, bus, bike and walking, and other data so that the city can compare statistics before and during the experiment. They will also be holding meetings with public groups to get their suggestions on the design of the lanes and the organization of alternative routes.

The city tried shutting down one lane of Burrard Bridge in 1996 for bike traffic. There was so much outrage from the public that council pulled the plug on the experiment after only a week.

fbula@png.canwest.com

WINNING DESIGN FOR THE BIKE LANES:

Each hour during peak times, 8,000 to 9,000 people cross the Burrard Bridge.

Lone drivers 49%

Carpoolers 21%

Transit riders 21%

Cyclists 5%

Pedestrians 4%

Source: City of Vancouver, Vancouver Sun

Ran with fact box "Winning Design for the Bike Lanes", which has been appended to the end of the story.
© The Vancouver Sun 2005
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