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Old June 27th, 2017, 03:05 AM   #2121
00Zy99
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Originally Posted by NCLI View Post
Sure, but it still means that they won't have to brake quite as hard, and opens the possibility of trains going through the station without stopping in the future.

If they want to hit that four hour trip time from Tokyo to Sapporo, reducing the number of stops further could be necessary.
If they were to eliminate all slow spots and bring the entire line up to 350 kph, how fast (keeping the current stops) could they do Tokyo-Sapporo? What about Tokyo-Hakodate?
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Old June 27th, 2017, 07:04 AM   #2122
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The question now is, which stops to cut? Omiya?
No, the stops (minimally) on a Tokyo-Sapporo service would be Ueno, Omiya, Sendai, Morioka, Shin Aomori, Shin Hakodate Hokuto. Note the last- and I'm sure as I've been living in Hokkaido for 20+ years and so I know the implications. Cutting any of those would be either stupid in terms of losing passenger traffic, or politically impossible. Rather than fixate on curves and expensive tilt, the biggest thing to tackle is increasing the speed through the Seikan Tunnel, which is straight and thus naturally a place to go fast.
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Old June 27th, 2017, 11:09 AM   #2123
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Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
No, the stops (minimally) on a Tokyo-Sapporo service would be Ueno, Omiya, Sendai, Morioka, Shin Aomori, Shin Hakodate Hokuto. Note the last- and I'm sure as I've been living in Hokkaido for 20+ years and so I know the implications. Cutting any of those would be either stupid in terms of losing passenger traffic, or politically impossible. Rather than fixate on curves and expensive tilt, the biggest thing to tackle is increasing the speed through the Seikan Tunnel, which is straight and thus naturally a place to go fast.
It doesn't need to stop at Ueno since few Kagayaki, Toki, Yamabiko and also Hayabusa services has already passed by that station. Also due to the close distance with Tokyo which is only 3.6 km and you can access both stations with local train on Keihin-Tohoku and Yamanote lines.
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Old June 27th, 2017, 01:20 PM   #2124
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Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
If they were to eliminate all slow spots and bring the entire line up to 350 kph, how fast (keeping the current stops) could they do Tokyo-Sapporo? What about Tokyo-Hakodate?
Tokyo-Hakodate is currently 4 hours, if you eliminate all slowzones (except Tokyo-Omiya, blame very strong Nimbyism) you could probably do it in 3h to 3h15m.

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Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
No, the stops (minimally) on a Tokyo-Sapporo service would be Ueno, Omiya, Sendai, Morioka, Shin Aomori, Shin Hakodate Hokuto. Note the last- and I'm sure as I've been living in Hokkaido for 20+ years and so I know the implications. Cutting any of those would be either stupid in terms of losing passenger traffic, or politically impossible. Rather than fixate on curves and expensive tilt, the biggest thing to tackle is increasing the speed through the Seikan Tunnel, which is straight and thus naturally a place to go fast.
Precisely the point I was trying to make - cutting any more stops wouldn't make sense.

Could the Seikan Tunnel be timeshared - say, Shinkansen trains using it at line speed between 8am and 9pm, and freight trains at all other times?
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Old June 27th, 2017, 11:17 PM   #2125
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If Tokyo-Omiya were in a deep, straight, tunnel, how much time could be shaved off?
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Old June 28th, 2017, 01:40 AM   #2126
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Personally, I think once the Hokkaido Shinkansen is complete, they'll probably run the fastest trains to stop through the following stations:

Tokyo
Ueno
Omiya
Sendai
Morioka
Hachinohe
Shin-Aomori
Shin-Hakodate-Hokuto
Shin-Otaru
Sapporo
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Old June 28th, 2017, 05:10 AM   #2127
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sacto7654 View Post
Personally, I think once the Hokkaido Shinkansen is complete, they'll probably run the fastest trains to stop through the following stations:

Tokyo
Ueno
Omiya
Sendai
Morioka
Hachinohe
Shin-Aomori
Shin-Hakodate-Hokuto
Shin-Otaru
Sapporo
It doesn't need to stop at Hachinohe since two hayabusa services in each direction already passed by that station since the day one of operation.
Although it was one of two core city in Aomori Pref., there is no major tourist and economic sector with huge impact to Japan or neither any major transportation hub at Hachinohe.
It basically just like compared Hachinohe with the city of Kurume, Fukuoka when all Mizuho services didn't stop at Kurume station on Kyushu Shinkansen.

It doesn't need to stop at Shin Otaru station neither since there is no any major economy or tourist sector in that city. Otaru was in economy decline since 1950's when many major sectors were shifted fo Sapporo. It just like compared Otaru with the city of Satsumasendai, Kagoshima when all Mizuho services also didn't make any stop at Sendai station on Kyushu shinkansen line since 2011.

And as i shared earlier ...
It doesn't need to stop at Ueno since few Kagayaki, Toki, Yamabiko and also Hayabusa services has already passed by that station. Also due to the close distance with Tokyo which is only 3.6 km and you can access both stations with local train on Keihin-Tohoku and Yamanote lines.

So it would be faster and make any sense if the fastest service only make stop at following stations :
Tokyo
Omiya
Sendai
Morioka
Shin-Aomori
Shin-Hakodate-Hokuto
Sapporo
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Old June 28th, 2017, 09:48 PM   #2128
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New N700S

JR Central announced today the production of 16-car pre-series trainset. The Series N700S is due to be introduced in March 2018, while the series-built trains would enter commercial service from 2021.



Quote:
Following the current fleet of N700 and N700A trainsets, the S suffix represents ‘Supreme’. JR Central says the trains are intended to be ‘the best of the N700 series’.

Three main technical changes are envisaged. Modifications to the braking system and automatic train control are intended to shorten the emergency braking distance in the event of an earthquake. Based on research undertaken at JR Central’s own R&D centre, there will be improvements to the bogie vibration sensors, which will be coupled with changes to the active suspensions to improve ride quality.

Silicon carbide semiconductors will be incorporated into the traction control system to reduce weight and minimise energy consumption. According to JR Central, these are more resistant to high temperatures, and will be combined with air cooling technology developed in house.

To enhance environmental performance, the N700S driving cars will have a new nose profile designated as ‘Dual Supreme Wing Type’. This has been developed using 3D simulation to reduce the sonic boom when running through tunnels. Air resistance will be minimised by modifying the car shape and smoothing the external surfaces. JR Central estimates that the new profile, lighter vehicles and the adoption of SiC semiconductors will together reduce energy consumption by around 7% compared to the Series N700A.

The other main change with the N700S will be the use of more standardised car designs, reducing the number of vehicle types to four, with a rearrangement of the underfloor traction and auxiliary equipment. This would make it simpler to marshal 16, 12 and 8-car formations as traffic dictates. JR Central believes that the use of standard cars will enable it to introduce ‘higher quality’ trains at a lower cost, with shorter delivery times for both the domestic and international markets.

...

Passenger comfort improvements include the installation of ‘Full Active Vibration Control’ on the Green Car vehicles. Electric outlets for mobile phones, which are already installed on all Green Car seats in the N700A sets, will be provided at all seats on the N700S. Li-ion batteries will be provided to power the toilets if the main supply is lost, ‘improving the passengers’ convenience at an unusual time’.
http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/h...trainsets.html











N700A vs N700S

For more details: http://jr-central.co.jp/news/release/_pdf/000034313.pdf
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Old July 1st, 2017, 02:23 AM   #2129
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I think the N700S may incorporate not only a new nose and standardized car design, but I could see the following changes:

1. The use of more carbon fiber structural parts on the bogies and an improved air suspension system so the slight "tilt" happens faster, which may allow even higher speeds on Tokaidō Line between Tokyo and Mashima Stations.

2. It will be designed to operate as fast as 300 km/h on selected sections of the Tokaidō Line between Tokyo and Shin-Osaka in addition to 300 km/h running on the San'yō Line.

3. There may be consideration for a 2x1 seating Gran Class configuration, already found on the E5/H5 and E7/W7 trainsets.
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Old July 1st, 2017, 04:35 AM   #2130
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I don't know about Gran-class. There's just too much demand to allow such a splurge on seating. Besides, the journeys are relatively short.

By the way, what's the plan on the E2 series? Is it being replaced by E5 or E7 or what?
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Old July 4th, 2017, 05:54 PM   #2131
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JR East will develop a new test-train ALFA-X



JR East announced on July 4 the new E-956 series (10-car) as a test train of the next generation of Shinkansen. The nickname is "ALFA-X" (Advanced Labs for Frontline Activity in rail eXperimentation), which is scheduled to be completed in spring of 2019. The idea is verify the "possibility of maximum speed 360 km/h in commercial operation" (400km/h in test driving).

Source: https://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2017/20170705.pdf
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Old July 4th, 2017, 07:17 PM   #2132
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I knew that JR East had to develop a new class of Shinkansen designed so it could operate between Utsunomiya and Morioka Stations at speeds up to 360 km/h (224 mph). I expect the final version to be called E8系 (JR East) and H8系 (JR Hokkaido).
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Old July 5th, 2017, 08:11 AM   #2133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sacto7654 View Post
I knew that JR East had to develop a new class of Shinkansen designed so it could operate between Utsunomiya and Morioka Stations at speeds up to 360 km/h (224 mph). I expect the final version to be called E8系 (JR East) and H8系 (JR Hokkaido).
Why did I think of
Quote:
gr8 b8 m8 I r8 8/8
On a side note, I'm very interested to see how these E956 trains turn out, and what kind of full-production trains we'll get out of it.

With the recent launch of the Chinese CR400, the last thing the Japanese want is to lose the speed war, especially since both countries have been competing rather fiercely for the overseas HSR market.
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