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Old February 28th, 2009, 03:23 PM   #1
dysan1
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...Durban Discussion

lets start over

Last thread
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...601928&page=53
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 12:00 AM   #2
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In case anyone didn't read this week's Sunday Tribune, major works on the Golden Mile start this month. I have also downloaded and read *all* the documents related to the project. A LOT of thought and work has gone into the planning. It was particularly interesting to read the long-term forecasts re: weather changes and the possible impact this could have on the beachfront. All in all, this project is very promising. I'd rank its potential impact alongside the most significant developments of the inner city such as the Revel Fox revamp of the beachfront in the 1980s, the building of the ICC, and the development of Ushaka and surrounds. From the looks of things, quite a few compromises re: promenade position have been made in regard to the revamp of Addington beach (beach will not be encroached; promenade will be moved closer to road).

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Old March 4th, 2009, 06:38 PM   #3
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KZN's Waterfall gets shop centre

A new, contemporary-style shopping centre has opened in KwaZulu-Natal's Waterfall (10km from Hillcrest in Durban).

And while December was not the ideal time to bring the centre on line, owing to the depressed economy, the R100m Linkhills Shopping Centre is already enjoying a healthy level of occupancy by a number of national brands. These include a flagship Pick n Pay, which has taken up 300sqm of floor space, and Mica Home Hardware on 2,000sqm.

In addition, Dunlop Tyre and Exhaust, Battery Centre and two other motor-trade associated businesses have opened their doors on the premises. There are also fast-food outlets, liquor, health and clothing stores, a butchery, a bakery and a computer outlet.

According to Bruce Macaulay, property administrator of the Rowles Property Group, the Hillcrest, Waterfall and Kloof triangle is one of the fastest growing residential areas in KwaZulu-Natal.

Further retail development is planned for the long-standing Waterfall Shopping Centre, across the road from the Linkhills Shopping Centre. Macaulay says it will increase in size from about 12,000 GLA to 55,000 GLA while simultaneously enjoying a facelift.

"We accept that the economy has weakened the retail market in all areas, from rentals to general spend by consumers, and we are aware that last year saw the closure of many businesses in all sectors, from retail to industrial. But we are positive about the ongoing, long-term growth of the area."

Commenting on the rapid growth of Waterfall, long sought out by entry level and first-time buyers, Gareth Bailey, RE/MAX Address CEO, says it is now completely self-sufficient. "The area has its own large shopping centres, pre-schools, primary and high schools and college, sports clubs and medical facilities. It also boasts many factories and offices in Brackenhill, its industrial and factory area."

"Waterfall's growth has been underpinned by the development of a number of well-priced estates in recent years. Plenty of land was sold a few years ago at prices that ranged from R250k upwards, which made new home building very viable. Even today, prices here are still very competitive. For example, a two or three-bedroom unit in a complex would start at around R740k while a two-bedroom freestanding house can be bought for as little as R730k."

For principal directors of Acutts Upper Highway Gregg Wilson and Michele Wilson, the new centre is a welcome addition, in line with the massive growth Waterfall and Crestholme have experienced in the last five years. – Ingrid Olivier

For more information contact Bruce Macaulay on 031 763 4433.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 10:55 PM   #4
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Here's a nice overview of Kingsmead's rich history. I can't even imagine a 12 day test, but it was played in Kingsmead in 1939 (still holds the record as the world's longest test match!). Let's hope SA can whip the Aussies in Durbs. They have a winning record on the ground.

-------------------

Pitch Report - Kingsmead, Durban
March 04 2009

Kingsmead - just a few hundred metres from the sea.

Established: 1923
Capacity: 25000
Floodlights: Yes
Ends: Umgeni End, Old Fort Road End
Home Team: The Dolphins
Head Groundsman: Wilson Ngobese
Test History: 35 Tests; 13 home wins; 9 away wins; 13 draws
Last 10 Tests: 6 home wins; 1 away win; 3 draws
Last 10 Tosses: 6 field first (4 wins, 1 loss, 1 draw); 4 bat first (2 wins, 2 draws)

Overview

Just a couple of hundred metres away from the ocean, Kingsmead is located in the humid city of Durban - home to six kilometres of wonderful sandy beaches that attract plenty of surfers.

The ground used to be the traditional venue for the Boxing Day Test, but the powers-that-be decided to move it to Port Elizabeth because of a drop in spectator numbers - most of them were probably on the beaches or just suffering from Christmas Day hangovers, and who can blame them?


The ground, which has played host to Tests since January 1923 when England and South Africa played to a draw, occupies a special place in South African cricket history - Graeme Pollock scored the last of his seven Test centuries here, an epic 274 that inspired a crushing innings-and-129-run thumping of the Australians.

Of course Gary Kirsten went one better than Pollock in 1999 when he equalled Darryl Cullinan's South African record Test score of 275 against England.

Kingsmead also hosted the timeless Test against England in 1939. The match lasted from March 3-13 and was only called off so that the English players would not miss their ship home.

Groundsman Wilson Ngobese caused a major stir in 2006 when he attempted to repair a damaged area of the pitch by hammering a dry piece of bulli into a small hole that had appeared in an area comfortably outside the line bowled to either right or left handers. This, according to the laws of the game, is illegal.

Last time out

South Africa completed a series turnaround against West Indies, beating their depleted visitors by an innings and 100 runs inside three days to secure a 2-1 series victory in January 2008.

With Chris Gayle and Ramnaresh Sarwan ruled out through injury, a top order of Daren Ganga, Brendon Parchment, Runako Morton, Marlon Samuels and Shivnarine Chanderpaul managed just 21 runs among them after South Africa won the toss and stuck the islanders in. The lower order rallied but the tourists were still bungled out for just 139 as Shaun Pollock took 4 for 35 in his final Test match.

In reply the hosts registered 556 for 4 with Graeme Smith, Ashwell Prince and AB de Villiers all making hundreds and while Samuels put up a fight in the West Indies' second innings, scoring 105 as stand-in skipper Dwayne Bravo made 75, they were unable to make the home side bat again.

Dale Steyn outshone Pollock in his final innings of Test cricket, but the all-rounder was still carried off the field by his teammates to ensure a happy farewell on his home ground.

Australia's last visit

Australia wrapped up the three-Test series at the first opportunity, securing victory here by 112 runs to take an unassailable two-nil lead in March 2006. But they did so under controversial circumstances as umpire Steve Bucknor steadfastly kept the players on the field under floodlights despite the fact that he had offered the light to the batsmen in similar conditions on previous days.

Debatable as it was whether there was enough natural light to continue deep into day five, it proved a gripping climax that was eventually decided by Shane Warne's six wickets on the final day.

Having won the toss and elected to bat, Ricky Ponting scored a hundred and Mike Hussey made 75 as the tourists managed 369 all out. That looked a solid score after conditions on the first day had required plenty of application, and when Graeme Smith fell first ball of the innings to Brett Lee the home side were in trouble.

Jacques Kallis dug them out of a hole with 114 but when he was caught and bowled by man of the series Stuart Clark South Africa quickly slipped to 267 all out. Hundreds in the second innings from Ponting and Matthew Hayden consolidated Australia's advantage before Adam Gilchrist came in at number five to blitz some quick runs (24 off nine deliveries) to set up the declaration shortly before the end of day four.

410 were required for victory, but the real task was survival. Openers Smith and AB de Villiers made it through to close and then put on a stand of 91, but then Warne struck to remove them both before getting rid of Kallis, Jaques Rudolph and Andre Nel.

As told by the Wisden Almanack, "when No. 11 Ntini walked out, the scene was set for a day/nighter rather than a Test. But Bucknor let play continue, and Warne, with a perfect googly, had Ntini lbw. He didn't pick it. But in that light, nobody could."

Happy Hunting Ground

After his match-winning efforts here in Australia's 2006 victory, Ricky Ponting has the most imposing record of the current crop of batsmen. His average of 85.50 from his two Tests here is head and shoulders above that of the local players.

AB de Villiers leads the way for the Proteas with an average of 64.20 from four Tests, while Jaques Kallis follows with 58.18 from a monstrous 11 Tests here. One man South Africa will be hoping they don't miss is Ashwell Prince, who has a handy average of 55.33 from his four Tests at Kingsmead.

As usual for South Africa at a home ground, Dale Steyn and Makhaya Ntini lead the home bowlers' records with averages of 23.80 and 24.62 respectively. A little worryingly for the hosts, Jacques Kallis' average of 37.80 at Kingsmead is some way below his career bowling average of 30.97.

Weather forecast

While there has been rain in the build-up to the match, it's generally been evening showers so the wicket has had plenty of preparation time. Even better news is that the storms appear to be clearing so we should have five days of uninterrupted cricket.

Conclusion

Sometimes referred to as 'the green mamba' due to its reputation as a seamer's wicket, I can confirm that the pitch is indeed very green today. Although much of the grass will be shaved off before play gets underway on Friday, we can expect a lively track that will be difficult to bat on for the opening day.

The one salvation for the batsmen (and perhaps for Stuart Broad, who had six sixes hit off him in one over by Yuvraj Singh during the World Twenty20 here in 2007) is that the ground is a lot smaller than the Wanderers and so they should get increased value for their shots.

While there is a long-standing myth that the tide affects the fall of wickets at the ground, in truth it's the wind which plays a role here. Southerly winds generally bring moisture and the threat of rain off the sea, while northerly winds tend to produce drier weather.

Deciding whether to bat or bowl first can be a toss-up, but unless we have a lot of cloud cover on the first morning expect the captain who wins the toss to bat first whilst acknowledging that it will be tough going for the opening two sessions.

http://www.cricket365.co.za/story/0,...005074,00.html
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Old March 5th, 2009, 08:34 AM   #5
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Ah such Memories, I was there for both the windies and Aussies games.
Good times, will try and make my way to the ground on the weekend
Lets hope the weather holds, was raining this morning.
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Old March 5th, 2009, 09:51 AM   #6
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is the capacity 25,000 outside of World cup mode too? i.e. without the temporary seats
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Old March 6th, 2009, 09:29 AM   #7
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Here's the infrastructure damage estimate from recent natural disasters...

------------------

KZN needs billions to repair damage from floods and fires

06 March 2009
Canaan Mdletshe

The heavy rains that have battered KwaZulu-Natal in the past four months, leaving a trail of death, destruction and mayhem have cost more than R400million in damages.

This was revealed during a disaster management meeting in Durban yesterday.

It was revealed that the province needed R2,4billion to rehabilitate infrastructure after tsunami-like tidal waves wreaked havoc along the coastline in 2007.

The South Coast and Umzinto and certain parts of eThekwini suffered damages estimated at R3,6billion during floods last June, as well as R199million damage caused to homesteads, livestock and infrastructure during veld fires last year .

Mike Mabuyakhulu, MEC for housing and local government, said that since November last year at least 28 people had been killed by natural disasters.

“Many families have been displaced because homes have been destroyed, with long- term ecological effects still to be determined. Such has been the devastating frequency with which the floods have occurred that since last November not a week has passed without incidents being reported,” he said.

Mabuyakhulu said the disasters had put a huge strain on the province’s disaster management resources.

“Preliminary assessments have revealed that at least 8500 houses were damaged and 2300 reduced to rubble.”

http://www.sowetan.co.za/News/Article.aspx?id=953313
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Old March 6th, 2009, 03:09 PM   #8
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They should move further inland or to areas not so flood prone then to keep rehabilitating people in the same areas.
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Old March 6th, 2009, 03:18 PM   #9
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easier said than done...
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Old March 6th, 2009, 03:52 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gulivar View Post
They should move further inland or to areas not so flood prone then to keep rehabilitating people in the same areas.
Most of the recent storm damage occured inland, not along the coast. The coast, in turn, was affected by the big waves.
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Old March 6th, 2009, 04:35 PM   #11
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Oh I see. Damn. :\
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Old March 6th, 2009, 05:29 PM   #12
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lose lose situation unfortunately. But better protections need to be put in place to prevent these situations happening
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Old March 6th, 2009, 06:33 PM   #13
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KZN's emerging wine industry

In BusinessLife (www.businesslife.co.za)


It is that time of year again, the KwaZulu-Natal 2009 Vintage is upon us as the few winemakers in the province prepare to start harvest. The Stables Wine Estate is looking at approximately 150 tons of grapes that they will be harvesting this year, a bumper crop, but the season has not been without its hassles as the weather has been both inconsistent and harsh but paradoxically extremely kind.

Fortunately the province is in the business of wine grapes and not table grapes, as the odd smattering of hail marked some of the grapes in the early days of ripening, which of course is not an issue with wine grapes as all that is required is the juice and not to look appealing to the consumer. The season started extremely slowly, with late rains and a really cool spring ensuring a late bud burst. This was great in that the vines were not at risk from late frosts, but slowed grape development during the summer, which turned out to be beneficial when one of The Stables Wine Estate’s vineyards was hit with some hail. As the sugar had not developed in the grapes they had high acidity, therefore there was no risk of rot developing in the grapes and the skin subsequently repaired allowing the grapes to ripen.

Unfortunately the weather was not so kind to the Cape where there was widescale damage to vineyards as a result of heavy rains and flooding early in the season. There was so much rain that many wineries could not use their tractors to spray as the ground was so soft the tractors were sinking. Western Cape Agriculture MEC Johan Gelderbom is on record to have said that the flooding was worse than the Laingsburg floods of 1981. Approximately 100 000 cases of wine to the value of R12 million was damaged at the Van Loveren wine estate near Robertson, with an estimated R790 million worth of damage to vineyards across the Province which will be really felt now as wineries go into harvest.

There are still a lot of wine critics in South Africa that abstain from commenting on the growing KZN wine industry with statements like ‘the jury is out on the province as a wine producer’ etc…yet we have seen just how volatile the climate can be for the countries leading wine region.

Fortunately for KZN, the rest of the world sees wine producing in the Province as an extremely exciting development for South Africa. The Midlands is in the same climate zone as Champagne and Burgundy regions of France which is why the KZN Winegrowers Association (KZNWA) is focusing on cultivars for Method Champagnes and Pinot Noir. It is believed that the Midlands has the potential to produce the countries finest Pinot Noirs due to the really cool climate compared to that of the Cape. These wines will be different to Cape Pinot Noirs in that they will be typical of cool climate red wines rather the hot climate of the Western Cape.

As the climate lends itself so favourably to bubblies The Stables Wine Estate is focusing on producing large volumes of Method Champagne.The first vintage of 2007 is due for release later in 2009 but this raises an interesting question, what should it be called? In South Africa a bottle fermented wine (or Champagne) cannot be labelled Champagne, as that is exclusively reserved for Champagnes produced in Champagne in France, so in SA it has historically been called a Method Cap Classique. The Cap refers to the Cape in this instance; as you can imagine the KZNWA is not inclined to use that name as the province needs its own proudly KZN name and The Stables Wine Estate has started discussions with the wine and spirits board to register a name for this style of wine produced in KZN with local grapes.

KZN residents will be invited to suggest a name for our very own Champagne, the winning name will be registered and available for use by anyone producing a method champagne in the province. This name along with The Stables Wine Estate first Method Champagne will be launched in 2009 in conjunction with a international marketing campaign that will market the province as a wine destination in terms of tourism, as well as developing interest for export potentials. This has already started to happen but that’s a story for the next column in May. In the meantime it is worth mentioning that the newly elected American President Barrack Obama has done enormous good for South African bubblies by insisting that Graham Beck was served on election night!!

In the meantime celebrate the 350th anniversary of the SA wine industry as wine was first produced at Groot Constantia in February 350 years ago. Join The Stables Wine Estate Champagne Business Breakfast, quaff method champagne with fine foods whilst the winemaking team produce the 2009 vintage on 27 February at the estate in Nottingham Road. Alternatively celebrate the end of harvest on 25 April by assisting the winemaking team to produce the 2009 Jerepico in the age old tradition of foot stomping at our annual Grape Crushing Festival!

Judy van Niekerk; The Stables Wine Estate; Tel 033 2666781; judy@stableswine.co.zaThis e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; www.stableswine.co.za.
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Old March 6th, 2009, 06:34 PM   #14
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Guys add www.businesslife.co.za to your favourites. Its a KZN dedicated business magazine that comes out monthly, the online portal is great with loads of info!
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Old March 8th, 2009, 12:16 AM   #15
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cool

one wonders with all the stuff Mike posted in the various Durban related threads in the projects section, is Durbans construction phase kick starting or will the financial recession knock them down? I hope it all go's ahead, because at the moment things are really really scary, I only got 2/3 projects going on at the moment.....
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Old March 9th, 2009, 03:58 PM   #16
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Well you need to look at long term...Umdloti is a long term project, as is ridgeside, but lets look at what is currently ago and under construction shall we?

Umhlanga

Commercial/office
Vodacom regional HQ - 12,000m2
Liberty regional hq - 12,000m2
Investec regional hq - 15,000m2
The Centenary - 14,000m2
Rydal vale office park - 7,000m2
Deneys Reitz - 5,000m2
Shepstone and Wiley - 10,000m2
Derivco expansion - 10,000m2
Unilever expansion - 6,000m2
Lincoln on the lake - 7,000m2
Porsche Umhlanga
Gateway expansions
The Glass house office park

Residential
The Quartz
The Aspect
The Cube
The Pearls
The Executive
Izinga Ridge (over 100 units uc of 2000)

Hotels
Protea the palms
HI Express
Southern Sun
Road lodge
Relais hotel
Radisson
Oyster box


I think this list could get real long DB if you throw in citywide and industrial work too!
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Old March 10th, 2009, 09:07 AM   #17
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yeh, its alot, but not as much as what was going on before. I spoke to some architects yesterday and they also saying local work is drying up, they now doing alot of work for projects out of SA. Oh well I can only hope, lol.
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Old March 10th, 2009, 10:23 AM   #18
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obviously in a situation the world is in now things will contract, that is to be completely expected across many industries. I think the current order book is actually really busy and full, what will be empty is the future order book, hence why architects will be quiter as new projects will be shelved or rested waiting for an upturn.

On that note, two of my architect mates are so overworked that they have brought in a few extra staff, so some are up and some are down
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Old March 10th, 2009, 08:41 PM   #19
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Little old, but an interesting piece

Ticket prices cut as Moses Stadium arch lights way for South Africa World Cup

As a grand lighting ceremony was staged in Durban to mark the completion of the iconic arch at Moses Mabhida Stadium, you had to retreat 10 miles, to the less salubrious corners of the city's KwaMashu township, to see the more enduring foundations of the 2010 World Cup being laid.

By Oliver Brown
Last Updated: 9:57PM GMT 18 Feb 2009

First steps: fireworks marking the completion of the iconic arch are seen at the Moses Mabhida stadium in Durban Photo: REUTERS

The stadium is undoubtedly impressive, palpable proof of the South African government's resolve to establish World Cup infrastructure at a prodigious rate, but carries little resonance without the guarantee of fans to fill it next summer and beyond. Sbu Ndebele, the Premier of KwaZulu-Natal, set an ambitious target in declaring that the tournament would leave a legacy of "confidence and prosperity" for the localities in which it would be held.

Durban is one such locality, a conurbation of jarring contradictions between high-rise affluence and slum-dwelling penury, and the one South African city already to have hosted an England match, in May 2003 – a game that helped launch the country's World Cup bid. In 477 days' time the 70,000-seat venue will form the centrepiece of the remarkable Kings Park sports complex, a manicured idyll set within a goal-kick of Durban's 'golden mile' of beaches and the starkest counterpoint to the tin shacks and tumbledown schools in KwaMashu.


But it is from the 'Ink' area, a cluster of townships encompassing Inanda, Ntzuma and KwaMashu, that some of the most ardent World Cup support will be drawn. Here, children need little invitation to kick a ball barefoot even during Durban's almost daily downpours, despite having not a rand to spend on going to a match. The developments in Kings Park could belong to another universe. Fifa stressed their commitment to an inclusive tournament by putting almost half a million £10 tickets on sale this week, nine months before any teams qualify. The move risked a black-market frenzy, but still these ticket prices remained beyond the pale for most residents of KwaMashu, where labourers have come to expect little more than 60 rand (£4) for a 14-hour day.

South Africa's local organising committee have done much to dispel Fifa's worst fears over their stop-start World Cup preparations, injecting billions of rand into stadium construction and all but shutting off the fallback plan to award the event to Australia. In the words of Danny Jordaan, the committee chairman, "only God" can deny South Africa its duties as hosts now.

Among these duties in Durban is the creation of a legacy that benefits more than simply those who can afford to attend the city's five group games. While the lines of social division have softened post-apartheid, they continue to run distressingly deep, as anyone watching the destitute Zulu women selling sweetcorn to policemen outside KwaMashu's men's hostel would attest. As such there is an imperative for projects that harness fervour around the World Cup to provide remedies for the township's deep-rooted ills of crime and low community confidence in the police.

Last Thursday, Sir Paul Stephenson, commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, made his first trip abroad in his new role to Durban, where his force have joined a partnership with British Airways and Charlton Athletic to impart their expertise in dealing with disaffected youth. The work in KwaMashu is twofold, with football clinics run alongside workshops that convey to the children their responsibilities and rights.

Coaches from Charlton are there, the popularity of their red shirts undimmed by the team's fall to the bottom of the Championship. Paul Elliott, the former Chelsea centre-half and latterly a Charlton trustee, pronounced himself "humbled" by the adulation he received, while Jason Morgan, chief executive of the club's community trust, explained: "Football is good common ground. Everyone from the police officers to the young people are football-mad, so nobody needs any urging to get involved. It breaks down barriers and means the young people are more likely to be receptive to other lessons, such as how to keep themselves safe."

The successes that the scheme has already achieved in Johannesburg and Cape Town, where volunteer coaches are also trained to Football Association Level One standards, support Morgan's confidence that it can inspire the impressionable children of KwaMashu. "Ikusasa Elethu", Zulu for "the future belongs to us", is the message that they repeatedly intone.

Fifa pledge

Fifa have promised to prevent the black-market trade in cheap seats for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa by making tickets solely available for collection in the country.

Tickets go on sale at 11am on Thursday through Fifa’s official website and branches of First National Bank, a World Cup sponsor. But regardless of how early they apply, fans will have to wait until April 2010 to hold tickets in their hands, with collection only possible in the nine host cities and at selected international airports.

To broaden access to the tournament Fifa have blocked off about 16 per cent of the tickets, the cheapest 'Category 4’ seats, for South African residents. These start at 140 rand (£10).
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Old March 11th, 2009, 10:39 PM   #20
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Stalled dam hikes water costs

March 11 2009 at 07:58PM

By Heinz de Boer

A 10 percent increase in the price of water is on the cards as the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry prepares to start construction on a new R2.1-billion dam and water tunnel that will boost water supplies to the eThekwini region.

Reports presented to the city's executive committee on Tuesday, painted a gloomy picture of possible water shortages, increases in the water price and the stalled dam building project that will now cost the taxpayer R1.25 billion more.

Meant to be completed by April 2012, the Spring Grove Dam building project has yet to start, pushing the cost of the project up from R350 million in 2008, to R2.1 billion.

Plans to build the dam on the Mooi River were first mooted in 2004 when the department realised that water demands in the major coastal municipal regions were already outstripping water supply capabilities.

Pumped

Plans had at first called for water to be pumped across Nottingham Road Ridge and into Midmar Dam, but these have been revised to allow for a gravity-fed tunnel that will lessen the need for pumps.

Power-generating turbines may also be installed to feed into the national energy grid, Durban Water and Sanitation Department head Neil Macleod said. Political parties have been asked to discuss the implications of the project, and make recommendations to help the city save millions of litres of water lost each year.

Macleod has suggested:


Studies to investigate the use of treated effluent.


Reducing pressures in the local water system to eliminate leaks.


Responding to the challenge of unmetered and illegal water connections.

"The response to illegal water connections needs to be multi-faceted with a strong political message that stealing water is unacceptable and offensive to communities."

"Strong action must be taken against those companies which have made a business out of illegal water supply."


This article was originally published on page 2 of Daily News on March 11, 2009

http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_i...1225587C609810
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