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Old May 23rd, 2010, 06:03 PM   #1
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#Aerotropolis: KZN | Dube Tradeport and Surrounding Development | Under Construction

Since the airport is now up and running the focus will move onto the tradeport. Any elements regarding this, please feature in this thread and keep the airport thread specifically dedicated to the airport.
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Old June 17th, 2011, 10:04 AM   #2
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Great article on the Tradeport side of things in the current Engineering News

Dube TradePort setting new logistics standards for SA

By: Keith Campbell
17th June 2011

KwaZulu-Natal’s Dube TradePort air logistics complex at King Shaka International Airport (KSIA), north of Durban, is the country’s and continent’s first truly twenty-first century facility of its type. “This is a unique facility,” enthuses Dube TradePort project executive: aeronautical Ahmed Bassa. “Before we built Dube, we went to the world’s top air freight terminals, like Frankfurt and Singapore, and we talked to the International Air Transport Association. They all advised us on future requirements [for air freight terminals]. So we designed Dube to meet future requirements as well as existing requirements.”

The Dube TradePort is owned by the KwaZulu-Natal provincial government, and is, in terms of the Public Finance Management Act, listed as a category 3C entity, which means that it generates revenue and transfers it to the provincial revenue fund. “We have our own governing legislation and mandate to drive development,” reports Dube TradePort CEO Rohan Persad. “Our budget for this financial year is about R530-million.”

To date, the province has invested R1.8-billion into the TradePort (out of a total capital expenditure of R8-billion on KSIA). The TradePort figure includes the expenditure on all related infrastructure, including the roads. “Management of the cargo terminal has been contracted out to World Flight Services, which operates about 140 cargo terminals across the globe, with an annual handling tonnage of about 3.5-million tons worldwide,” he adds.

“Uniquely for South Africa, everyone – the air freight operators, air freight handlers, South African Revenue Service/Customs, South African Police Service, and so on – is in one building,” points out Bassa. “So coordination and liaison are quick and convenient.”

Technological Terminal

The fundamental elements in air freight are containers called unit loading devices (but universally known as ULDs) and pallets. All air freight is carried in or on these, and every single one, in the entire world, no matter where or by whom it was manufactured, or who owns it, has its own unique serial number. When an aircraft arrives at KSIA, taxis up to and halts at the TradePort’s cargo terminal, the ULDs and pallets are unloaded onto trailers called dollies – organised into trains and towed by tractors, these are familiar sights at all major airports.

The cargo terminal is divided into domestic and international sections, which are strictly segregated. National carrier South African Airways has its own area within the domestic section, which it runs in its own way, with limited automation. Currently, the domestic airfreight passing through the TradePort amounts to some 8 000 t/y.

In the international section, things are much more automated. Taken from the aeroplane to the cargo terminal building, the ULDs and pallets from international flights are unloaded onto a roller conveyor and conveyed through an X-ray machine before they enter the storage area.

“This facility is the only one in the country, the only one in Africa, in which every container that enters the building, from anywhere in the world, is X-rayed,” highlights Bassa. “ULDs and pallets in transit also all automatically go through the X-ray. The X-ray images can be downloaded to customs so that they can monitor and clear the cargo in real time. This is one of the future requirements we designed the TradePort to meet.”

Once the cargo container, whether a ULD or pallet, reaches the airside (that is, runway side) part of the cargo terminal, known as the transit shed, it is automatically assigned a unique number, which incorporates the unit’s own serial number, but includes other digits indicating the type of aircraft it can fit into and the flight number and date of the flight on which it arrived (if the container is incoming) or (if it is in transit or is outgoing) on which it will leave. “We can manage the freight by remote control,” he explains. “We have a full monitoring system and we can see what is happening everywhere. And we have a full inventory system in which every item is logged. Because everything is digital, every item has a paperless trail. Every item in the facility is archived.”

Once in the transit shed, the container is picked up by a forklift and carried to another roller conveyor, which feeds the elevated transfer vehicle (ETV). The ETV is a key system for the cargo terminal operations. It is a cargo lift and transfer system that runs along a concrete track (with a central rail) and feeds two sets of storage bays, one on each side, which run most of the length of the transit shed. Each set of storage bays has four stories. This multistorey ULD park allows the international section of the transit shed to handle 150 000 t/y of cargo in an area of 10 000 m2, instead of the some 50 000 m2 that would have been required had traditional storage systems been used.

Although the ETV has a control cabin and can be driven manually, it is usually under the control of the transit shed’s computer system. “The computer decides where a container is to be stored, remembers where it is stored, and retrieves it when required – as indicated by its assigned number,” says Bassa. “We do have manual overrides and manual backups, in case the system crashes. We also have a diesel generator for emergency power, supplied by a 14 000 ∙ fuel tank.”

There are additional racks of storage bays that are currently serviced by forklifts. When operating between these racks, the forklifts are guided by underfloor cables so that they do not collide with the racks. “This is unique in South African cargo terminals,” he affirms. The forklifts are all standard units, except that each has been fitted with a memory system, which tells the operator where cargo stored during previous shifts is located.

Once processed and cleared, incoming ULDs and pallets are transferred to a roller conveyor system and transported across an enclosed bridge to the warehouse that forms the landside (road side) element of the terminal. This is believed to be the only roller conveyor bridge in the world.

Once in the landside warehouse, which has an area of about 12 000 m2, the containers can be collected by the air freight handling companies and despatched to their final destinations. (For exports, the process is, naturally, reversed.) “Only one bay of the warehouse is still unoccupied. We’re already planning a second warehouse,” he states.

The transit shed includes a refrigerated section, which has an annual capacity of some 30 000 t. This is subdivided into two temper-ature zones – chilled and frozen. Whether delivering cargo for export, or collecting imported cargo, refrigerated trucks drive up to the refrigerated section’s own loading/ unloading dock and doors.

Outgoing cargo is X-rayed in the chilled zone and then taken by the ETV to either a chilled or frozen storage bay, as required. The automated system allows the despatch of refrigerated ULDs to the aircraft at the last possible moment to ensure that they retain their cool temperatures. Incoming cargo is retrieved from storage by the ETV and passed through the chilled zone to the awaiting trucks.

When the current transit shed reaches full capacity, the current landside warehouse will be converted to become a second transit shed, with a new warehouse being built to replace it.


Fort Dube

The Dube TradePort also has a high security valuables handling facility, designed and operated by the famous US security group, Brink’s Incorporated (founded in 1859), but available for use by all secure transport companies. The facility handles both valuable and vulnerable commodities. Valuables include obvious things such as gold, silver and diamonds, but also weapons and more exotic cargoes such as nuclear materials (for example, radioisotopes for nuclear medicine). Vulnerables include credit cards, traveller’s cheques, cellphones and laptops.

Physically completely separate from the cargo terminal complex, at the end of its own road, screened from prying eyes by large earthen embankments, the Brink’s facility is protected both by concentric rings of formidable physical defences – walls, fences and barriers – and modern sensors. When the time comes for valuable and vulnerable cargo to be taken to an aircraft, it is done in the facility’s own protected vehicle.

Dube TradePort includes other facilities beyond the cargo terminal. “We have 30 ha of development land, which we are making available to the private sector, but only to companies in the air freight sector or manufacturers who will use a lot of airfreight, as we want to stimulate our business,” asserts Persad. This area is called the TradeZone and phase one is now open for investment. A second and third phase are envisaged over the coming years and decades, and completion of phase three would give the TradeZone a land area of 144 ha.

Dube City, now under construction about 1 km from the KSIA international terminal, is a combination of commercial offices, a hotel and a shopping, recreation and entertain- ment mall, designed to be a green complex, employing environment-friendly principles.
Associated with Dube City is the TradePort’s own head office building, named 29 Degrees South, which is scheduled to be completed next month.


Flower power

More advanced in development than the TradeZone or Dube City is another element of the TradePort – the AgriZone. “The AgriZone is a controlled growing area, part of the Dube TradePort strategy to get into the integrated perishables supply chain,” sums up AgriZone operations manager Erna Grové, who is an industrial engineer. “Phase one of AgriZone is composed of four blocks of 4 ha each, for a total area of 16 ha. These are basically giant, fully climate-controlled greenhouses. They are designated Blocks A to C, with Block C being commissioned first.” Phase two of the AgriZone will be under shade nets and plastic and could eventually cover 80 ha.

The AgriZone will grow vegetables and flowers, and the objective is to produce some 3 000 t/y of these in the phase-one green- houses. These will be supplied to both domestic and international customers – the TradePort hopes to start exporting within two years.

Block C is already in operation, with the first harvest collected last week. Together with the other three greenhouses, it employs hydroponics in closed systems. As much as possible – and especially water – is recycled (eventually, the recycled water becomes too saline and can no longer be reused). Irrigation is by a drip system, and each greenhouse also has a misting system to maintain humidity and a heating system to reduce humidity, when required. The growing medium used is coco peat, which is derived from the fibres surrounding the shells of coconuts. This is totally organic.

Each greenhouse is fed from its own dam, and these dams, in turn, are fed from two reservoirs, one with a capacity of 30 000 m3 and the other with a capacity of 24 000 m3. More dams are planned as well as a wastewater treatment plant, which will use reverse osmosis, ultraviolet light and sand filtering to process wastewater from the airport, permitting it to be reused forirrigation purposes. This will require the construction of four ponds, with anaverage capacity of 2 000 m3 each, which will be enclosed with floating covers.

The complex includes a nursery, a 1 600 m2 packhouse, and a tissue culture laboratory. “Young plants need to be acclimatised in the nursery before being transfered to the main greenhouses,” explains Grové. “Once the produce is cut, it will go straight to the packhouse.”

Block C and Block A form a joint venture (JV) between the TradePort and Qutom Farms, of Johannesburg. While Blocks C and A grow vegetables, Block D will be dedicated to flowers and will also be a JV, although with another growing company.

“Part of the project is the rehabilitation of the local environment, removing alien species and replanting indigenous ones,” she highlights. “We have a nursery to propagate indigenous species and we have developed 260 such species. We will need to expand this to 330 indigenous species.

Edited by: Martin Zhuwakinyu

http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/art...try-2011-06-17
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Old June 17th, 2011, 11:17 AM   #3
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Fantastic overview of the project. So impressive. Will undoubtedly have a major impact on Durban's and KZN's economy.
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Old June 20th, 2011, 07:31 PM   #4
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The 60 Year plan

Current


Final
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Old June 20th, 2011, 07:37 PM   #5
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Great Gallery link for all the develops underway, complete and upcoming.

http://www.dubetradeport.co.za/Gallery
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Old September 23rd, 2011, 10:35 AM   #6
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Here's a good detailed preso on the overall Dube Tradeport, showcasing many of the completed elements like the Agri areas.

http://www.ebandla.co.za/uploads/Dub...ceJuly2011.pdf
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Old November 16th, 2011, 04:26 PM   #7
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Good pro-active initiative to help source cargo to the terminal, especially cargo from KZN that is going out through Gauteng.

Greater cargo capacity needs to be available from Durban (i.e. 2nd flight to Dubai or more routes) to really impact though, but it is good to see them being different!

Dube TradePort invests millions in truck project
November 16 2011 at 12:49pm


DUBE TradePort has invested about R12 million in a fleet of six trucks that brings cargo from different parts of the country to be exported out of King Shaka International Airport to bolster its air cargo business.

It is still early days, but Dube TradePort’s aeronautical projects executive, Ahmed Bassa, said the idea was to use the new fleet as a value-added service to support the cargo terminal. This is part of the provincial agency’s bigger plans to establish the facility as an air cargo trade gateway to South Africa and in the longer term to the Southern African Development Community.

“We have several freight companies that deal with Dube TradePort through our operators of the cargo terminal, French-based World Flight Services. This specialised airport trucking service, fully branded with Dube TradePort livery and called Dube airoad, will not operate in the general trucking industry and thus is not in competition. It is aimed to facilitate air cargo out of Durban, thus essentially creating new and more business for the cargo terminal,” he said.

“We have six trucks with track and trace technology and Euro Emissions 5 ratings, which means lower emissions. Four of the trucks will operate long-distance and one is refrigerated. They go to places like Port Elizabeth, East London, Cape Town and even Joburg to send cargo out of Dube TradePort.

“Obviously we will also bring cargo in, but as part of our mandate to develop exports and trade, we are especially targeting industries like auto component manufacturers. We want to make it viable for such industries in the Eastern Cape and KZN to be able to export faster by air out of Dube TradePort,” said Bassa.

“We are looking at various sectors and regions, including neighbouring provinces and countries, for opportunities to transport cargo out of Dube TradePort. Our research also shows that between 48 000 to 68 000 tons of air cargo that originates out of KZN is transported to Joburg and then flown out. We want this cargo to go out of Dube TradePort,” he said.


An aerial view of the Dube TradePort cargo terminal, showing the inventive overhead conveyer bridge that transports cargo from the terminal to an adjoining building.

AP
Bassa said the Dube airoad airport trucking service was officially launched during the Air Cargo Summit in September, which was sponsored by Emirates’ SkyCargo division and hosted by Dube TradePort.

He said with Dubai-based airline Emirates’ strong support of Dube TradePort’s vision to develop the trade port as South Africa’s new trade gateway and airfreight hub, one of Dube airoad’s trucks had been branded with the colours and emblem of Emirates SkyCargo.

Vision

“Emirates have shown confidence in Durban and the Dube TradePort vision, and came in even before the airport and trade port was built.

“They came in ahead of the opening of King Shaka International, but the move was a direct result of our investment in the airport.

“With imminent plans for a bigger plane on the current route or a second daily flight, the old airport would not have had the kind of infrastructure and seamless facilities that we have at Dube TradePort,” he said.


The Emirates SkyCargo Boeing 747 long-range freighter, which landed at King Shaka airport with 110 tons of off-shore drilling equipment destined for use in the Durban harbour.

Rogan Ward
“Emirates have put their faith in us and we wanted to recognise their effort, so we decided to co-brand one of our trucks with Emirates SkyCargo.

“Their daily flight out of King Shaka International is doing unbelievably well with great passenger load factors. Various cargos are handled on this flight in the underbelly of the plane and we want to develop this further with increased capacity on the cards,” he said.

Last year the airline also brought in a dedicated Emirates SkyCargo freighter plane twice to the Cargo Terminal.

In June it brought in 117 tons of general merchandise because of delays at the harbour, and in September 110 tons of offshore drilling equipment destined for the Durban harbour.

“These were special flights, but ultimately in the future we want to have regular Emirates SkyCargo freighter flights operating out of Dube TradePort,” said Bassa.

Ricardo Isaacs, Emirates SkyCargo manager at Dube TradePort, said the airline was proud of its relationship with the provincial agency and to have its brand so powerfully endorsed.

“This is the first ever endorsement and branding of this type for an international carrier in South Africa, so it is hugely momentous for Emirates,” he said.

Meanwhile, Bassa said Dube TradePort had invested about R200 million in the cargo terminal and related equipment since opening last year.

This includes the trucks, new cargo handling equipment and an air-bridge conveyer system that connects the cargo terminal with a Dube TradePort building for airfreight forwarding companies, among other equipment.


http://www.iol.co.za/mercury/dube-tr...ject-1.1179696
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Old November 19th, 2011, 01:02 PM   #8
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Great to see the Dube Tradeport making more firsts

Big rooftop solar installation for Dube TradePort

By: Henry Lazenby

18th November 2011

The Dube TradePort, north of Durban in KwaZulu-Natal, will soon boast Africa’s largest roof-mounted photovoltaic (PV) system, SolarWorld Africa, which is supplying the 600 kWp (600 kilowatt-peak) installation, said this week.

The first phase of the PV system would be installed before the seventeenth Conference of the Parties (COP 17) climate negotiations get under way in the city on November 28.

The installation, the capital cost of which has not been disclosed, is intended to generate power to supply the Dube TradePort’s AgriZone grid with electricity for cold storage for the produce harvested from the facility’s 80 000m2 of greenhouses. The electricity would also power the packing lines, packing equipment, offices and storage facilities.

The complete installation will offset the carbon emissions of the Dube TradePort by 830 t of carbon dioxide every year, for the next 25 years.

With a power generation capacity expected to exceed 600 kWp, the eThekwini municipal authorities granted permission for the installation to be connected to the municipal grid.

“Our fit-out of solar panelling for the pack houses at the AgriZone is part of our overall strategy to drive sustainability of the businesses that are operating from the AgriZone. The source of power provides cost efficiencies for operations and lowers our carbon footprint in our first perishables supply chain,” Dube TradePort Corporation CEO Rohan Persad said.

The first phase of the installation took place on the roof of the logistics and storage facility, which will feed power to the AgriZone grid before the start of the COP 17. The second phase of the installation would be installed on the roof of the warehousing facility, once the building’s construction had been completed.

“This ground-breaking photovoltaic installation will make a significant contribution towards meeting the energy requirements of the AgriZone’s pack houses and in doing so, enable a more sustainable and environmentally sound operation at Africa’s most advanced hydroponics facility,” joint venture (JV) partner Power Solutions MD and lead engineer on the project Axel Scholle said.

SolarWorld Africa, together with its partner Power Solutions, undertook the project in a JV to install the German solar technology.

“We are proud to be involved in this lighthouse project, which showcases the African continent’s unlimited potential for solar power generation. It is especially important at this time when the world’s focus is centred on the COP 17 in Durban,” SolarWorld Africa MD Gregor Küpper said.

http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/art...ort-2011-11-18
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Old December 13th, 2011, 12:18 PM   #9
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Aiming for cloud nine
December 7 2011 at 01:38pm

KWAZULU-NATAL could become the cloud computing hub of the continent if Dube TradePort has its way.

The provincial government agency, which is in charge of developing the land, cargo facilities and AgriZone around King Shaka International Airport, has set its sights on supporting the development of the ICT (information and communication technology) sector in KZN and the nascent cloud computing business.

Hamish Erskine, Dube TradePort’s ICT executive, said the company had invested more than R100 million in its ICT infrastructure, which included two data centres and laying broadband fibre optic cable across the site.

“We’ve gone beyond the original ‘cyberport’ concept for the TradePort that we had years back in the planning stage.

“Originally the IT infrastructure was meant to support the cargo terminal and trade related businesses…,” he said.

“However, with the rapid advancement in ICT, we realised we had to adapt our plans to also open up opportunities for the development of the ICT.



“In addition to investing in two data centres at Dube TradePort, we’ve also secured what’s called an ECS licence from the Independent Communications Authority of SA. Essentially, the licence has allowed us to buy bandwidth in bulk from several of the major telecommunication providers such as Neotel, Telkom, Vodacom and even the city of Durban’s own MetroConnect service.

“This means we can then provide voice and data services at significantly lower rates to businesses operating within the TradePort. We’ve launched the service called Dube iConnect and are working with various resellers like Business Connection and Dimension Data,” said Erskine.

He said already Dube TradePort was servicing 34 companies and 400 different users operating from its facilities.

The service was limited to the TradePort site, but also meant that all calls made within the Dube TradePort were free. This excluded the airport terminal, which was operated by the Airports Company South Africa.

Erskine said: “With this initiative we are looking to use ICT to enhance business opportunities and the cost of doing business on site going into the future… It won’t be just the freight forwarders and trade-related business based here that will have access to these services, but any business operating out of Dube TradePort – from companies based at the future office blocks that will go up at Dube City, to the planned hotels and other facilities.

“They will all have access to lower-cost ICT and related other services.”



Advantage

He said the data centres had “level 2” status, but Dube TradePort wanted to increase this to “level 4” to offer world-class data storage services to business.

“Data centres and cloud computing are becoming a big thing globally and we want to take advantage of the opportunities it provides in spurring economic development and job creation. Dube iConnect includes a high-end computing and storage platform that is available to the Dube TradePort community of users for a fee that is structured according to the number of CPUs and amount of memory and storage required,” he said.

According to ICT research firm World Wide Worx, large organisations in SA are increasingly adopting cloud computing as they realise it does not always pay to own their own information technology systems. The concept of accessing processing power, data storage facilities or software on tap has been around for years.

But a lack of affordable bandwidth and experienced service providers have made it a potentially risky business.

World Wide Worx reported that SA’s bandwidth boom had already allowed 46 percent of large local businesses to adopt some form of cloud computing.



It said that by 2013 more than half would have taken the plunge.

“While companies are starting to embrace the technology, there is definitely no herd mentality around cloud computing, which is a positive indicator,” said World Wide Worx managing director Arthur Goldstuck.

“Cloud computing has massive advantages as it removes the cost of buying, installing, maintaining and upgrading hardware and software.

“It also lets companies pay for services on demand and creates economies of scale if a third-party specialist handles the equipment for them,” he said.

http://www.iol.co.za/mercury/aiming-...nine-1.1194095
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Old March 15th, 2012, 09:05 PM   #10
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Massive logistics wharehouse in the works...

--------------

TradePort nets R350m investment

March 15 2012 at 02:32pm
By Suren Naidoo

Dube TradePort has secured its first private sector investment – a R350 million development by the Durban-based Shree Property Group into a new 100 000m2 air freight logistics and warehousing facility at its TradeZone.

The deal, signed last week, was revealed exclusively to The Mercury last week on the sidelines of the launch of the second phase of development in the multibillion-rand project by President Jacob Zuma.

Dube TradePort, which is home to the King Shaka International Airport, is being developed as a major air freight trade gateway and future “aerotropolis” or “airport city” at La Mercy, north of Durban, over the next few decades.

Hamish Erskine, the property executive at Dube TradePort, said the deal with the Shree Property Group was significant and timely.

“It comes as we launch the second phase of development and is a major land leasing deal that will see a huge logistics and warehousing facility being built at the TradeZone near Dube TradePort’s Cargo Terminal. It’s an exciting development that will support our plans and represents our first private sector property deal signed,” he said.

Erskine said the deal was particularly significant in the current economic environment and he believed it could spur further private sector investment into Dube TradePort’s various property projects.

“We have 23ha of land earmarked for development at the TradeZone in the first phase, but there is also the Dube City development, which is expected to attract more than R5 billion in investment over the next decade,” he said.

Pran Shree, the CEO of Shree Property Group, said the company was a major player in the sector in KwaZulu-Natal, owning about 250 000m2 of industrial and warehousing property close to the prime Durban Port area.

“Our investment into Dube TradePort will complement our business and other properties. We are one of the biggest players in citrus export through our facilities near the Durban harbour. Therefore, our investment here (in Dube TradePort) is a strategic one. It will add value to our business, by allowing us to build our presence in the air freight logistics business,” he said.

Shree said he strongly believed in the vision of Dube TradePort to establish the port as the continent’s air freight trade gateway of the future.

“It’s a visionary plan that we fully support, that’s why we are investing here. It will establish KwaZulu-Natal as the first truly multimodal trade hub on the continent. We have the biggest container port in Durban and Richards Bay deals with bulk cargos. Greater co-ordination between these harbour ports and Dube TradePort could make KZN a mega global player in trade logistics,” he said.

Miles Taylor, a KZN property executive at Standard Bank, the bankers of the Shree Property Group, said the deal was significant. He said it highlighted the potential of Dube TradePort and the north Durban development corridor.

KZN Premier Zweli Mkhize said the long-term strategic objective of the Dube TradePort project was the establishment of an “aerotropolis” north of Durban, stretching from uMhlanga to Ballito. Last year The Mercury revealed that the mammoth project would see hotels, office blocks, retail, entertainment and other commercial developments coming up around the airport in coming years.


http://www.iol.co.za/mercury/tradepo...ment-1.1257319
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Old March 16th, 2012, 12:57 AM   #11
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Great to see... 100000m2 is a massive warehouse! And the sign that stablisation is occurring and the next phase of investment is coming. Now just needs the flights to match
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Old March 19th, 2012, 03:11 PM   #12
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Shree's only invest in a sure thing, so they know this place has potential.
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Old April 8th, 2012, 05:27 PM   #13
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Good to hear that things are far along...


Integrated Hotel and Office Development being Planned

Negotiations are currently at an advanced stage with a hotel developer keen to locate an integrated office and hotel facility in the centre of the emergent Dube City, located just one kilometre from the airport terminals.

Dube City comprises eight blocks, consisting of 45 individual and competitively priced stands. All the stands are level and are available on long-term leases, negotiable up to 50 years, depending on the nature of the development.

This urban ‘green’ hub provides an ultra-modern, world-class and cosmopolitan 24-hour, pedestrian-friendly business and leisure facility. Dube City incorporates office, hospitality, entertainment and retail experiences.
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Old April 8th, 2012, 05:28 PM   #14
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Expanding Dube TradePort

Dube TradePort is currently 2 040ha in extent and forms the heart of the emerging aerotropolis, with the development’s 60-year master plan seeing expansion to some 20 000ha.

As part of Dube TradePort Corporation’s planned expansion of the precinct, allowing for increased opportunities for the business and surrounding communities, the entity recently concluded an agreement of sale for an additional 172ha of land.

The new parcel of land is located beyond the current Dube TradeZone boundary, adjacent the R102 close to Verulam. It is envisaged that the land will be utilised for sustainable mixed-use development into the future.


http://www.dubetradeport.co.za/Uploa...tradeport.html
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Old April 8th, 2012, 05:32 PM   #15
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Old June 4th, 2012, 02:25 PM   #16
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Airports - The Future of Urban Development
Date: Thursday, 31 May, 2012 - 09

The Durban University of Technology hosted Dr John Kasarda, the Father of the Aerotropolis, at the DUT Hotel School yesterday (May 30 2012) where he delivered a talk on the Aerotropolis, a term he defines as a new urban form placing airports in the centre with cities growing around them, connecting workers, suppliers, executives, and goods to the global market-place.

Dr Kasarda is Kenan Distinguished Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship and Director of the Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at the University of North Carolina's Kenan-Flagler Business School where he heads up the Institute's Center for Air Commerce. He is an international consultant in the conceptualisation and strategic planning of the aerotropolis. He also chairs the annual Airport Cities World Conference and Exhibition and has been an advisor to airports around the globe and also served as a consultant to the Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton administrations.

In 2011, Time magazine named Aerotropolis "One of the Ten Ideas that Will Change the World."

Born in Pennsylvania, Dr Kasarda's has published more than 100 articles and nine books on airport cities, aviation infrastructure, economic development, and competitiveness.

This informative academic lecture, hosted by DUT in partnership with the Dube TradePort Corporation and Tongaat-Hulett, came as the Dube Aerotropolis, an ambitious plan to transform King Shaka International Airport into KwaZulu-Natal’s economic powerhouse, is currently in its first phase.

Dube Trade Port Corporation, the government owned company behind the Dube Aerotropolis said this Aerotropolis will create an environment where global meets local, integrating business with leisure and flight as well as the ability to fly and connection.

The first purpose-planned-aviation-related city in Africa with a design based on the principle of sustainable development, the Dube Aerotropolis will have five zones all centered around the airport. The first is the Dube City; an urban green hub located within Dube Trade Port that provides a secure, world class cosmopolitan 24 hour business, trade and retail experience. The second component is the Dube AgriZone; Africa’s first integrated perishable supply chain which is basically an IT integrated high-tech agricultural cluster that hosts the largest climate controlled growing area in Africa.

The third part is the Dube CargoTerminal, which will feature technologically advanced cargo-handling equipment that allows cargo to be digitally tracked and mechanically handled. The forth piece is the Dube TradeZone, which will comprise of a specialist freight orientated precinct offering premium airside real estate. The Dube TradeZone is the first precinct in the world where freight forwarders and shippers are all located within a single facility with direct airside access while the fifth component is the King Shaka Airport, which is the only international airport in Africa where integrated air cargo services are a priority.

Dr Kasarda offered an outlook at the opportunities of the Dube Aerotropolis by drawing on decades worth of progressive research.

Dr Kasarda said transportation infrastructure has always stimulated and shaped business location throughout the ages. The first wave was sea ports, then river canals, followed by the railroad wave, then highways and now airports, which Dr Kasarda said will become the 21st century commerce magnets and regional economic accelerators.

“The 21st century will be an aviation based economy because between 2010 and 2030, worldwide commercial passenger traffic will likely increase from 4.9 billion to about 13.3 billion. In the same period, world air cargo is expected to move to more than triple. Air logistics and the new economy are inextricably woven. Already, over one third of the value of worldwide trade already moves by air cargo. There is a real physical internet moving people and products. Airports today are much more than aviation infrastructure. They are multimodal, multifunctional enterprises generating considerable commercial development within and well beyond their borders. The airport leaves the city and the city follows; the airport becomes the city,” he said.

Turning his attention to the Dube Aerotropolis, Dr Kasarda said one of the challenges facing it is whether KwaZulu-Natal and its municipalities will successfully develop this “new economy”. The development of a new development strategy cornerstoned by the Aerotropolis, fully leveraging the assets of King Shaka International Airport as well as Dube Trade Port Corporation for KZN’s competitive advantages as well as coordinated actions between all government levels and the private sector in implementing the Aerotropolis strategy will respond to the challenges it faces.

“Dube Aerotropolis assets include a huge amount of undeveloped land in the King Shaka Airport region. There is 78 percent of 22 000 hectares within 15 km of King Shaka available. You have a blank canvass. That is your advantage. You have good road and rail connectivity to the South African metro markets as well as Africa’s two largest ports. You also have a state of the art cargo terminal at Dube TradePort. But you can’t brush problems under the rug,” said Dr Kasarda.

He said these problems include high costs of electricity and ICT bandwidth, agricultural exports of relatively low value and limited high-tech, poor access to and from rural areas and an overburdened road network as well as an underutilised rail system.

On getting it right, he said, “The Aerotropolis is not an option, it is necessary otherwise you will get an unsustainable development. Learn from aerotropolis experiences elsewhere, follow aerotropolis planning principles and upgrade the existing aerotropolis planning you have so far. But in all this rush, don’t forget the airport, it is an extremely important component of the aerotropolis,” he said.

http://www.dut.ac.za/node/1727
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Old June 13th, 2012, 12:25 PM   #17
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Some heavy hitting influential elements to this plan...

Durban: Plan to boost local economy through new airport city
Wednesday Jun 13, 2012

The KwaZulu-Natal government has announced a multimillion-rand plan to consolidate its new King Shaka International Airport with a view to positioning it as a key driver of the province's economy.

Delivering his 2012/13 R1.5 billion budget speech in the legislature in Pietermaritzburg yesterday, Economic Development and Tourism MEC Mike Mabuyakhulu said these plans would see the creation of a city around the new airport and Dube TradePort which would stretch from uMhlanga to Ballito.

"This new airport city will create a world-class physical and operational environment geared towards attracting trade, investment and infrastructure to the KZN economy.

"This will require mass investment by both government and the private sector, with government in the lead," said Mabuyakhulu.

To drive this consolidation of the airport, a provincial task team has been established to facilitate an integrated and comprehensive strategy on an aerotropolis (airport city) in the province.

To kick-start this development, a new road is to be constructed, at a cost of R250 million, to link the TradePort to the Watson Highway.

"As a logistics hub, this is a critical requirement, as it ensures long-term connectivity to transport routes for businesses operating in the northern areas of the precinct.

"This road will also open up new property development opportunities within the Herwood precinct, targeting companies which are able to take advantage of the location and the logistics environment created," he said.

Work on this road is scheduled to begin towards the end of June this year, for it to be opened in October 2013.

A new R35m sewer pipe was being constructed to create a permanent connection between the Dube TradePort and the Tongaat regional sewerage works.

Furthermore, Dube TradePort is pursuing investment in the highly strategic aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul business areas.

"The objective is to position the Dube TradePort as the hub for aircraft maintenance in Africa. The site will be purpose-designed and have direct runway access for aircraft, making it the most operationally and functionally advanced aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul facility on the continent," said Mabuyakhulu.

The earthworks for this infrastructure, which will cost R120m, have begun and would be completed by May 2013. The development will boast aircraft hangars, support buildings and bulk infrastructure. The maintenance, repair and overhaul facility is to be operational in mid-2014.

However, Mabuyakhulu said the long-term success of the aerotropolis would depend on far greater levels of investment in transport connectivity.

"Strong and sustainable development corridors must be established to link the Dube TradePort to eThekwini in the south and Ballito in the north. To achieve this, the Dube TradePort city assessed the feasibility of building a north to south light rail link.

"As a result of this investigation, a viable physical route has been identified which will ultimately link Ballito to Moses Mabhida Stadium."



The Mercury

http://www.iolproperty.co.za/roller/...to_boost_local
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Old June 13th, 2012, 12:55 PM   #18
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This is going to be massive, KZN is on a roll with this and the dug out port.
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Old June 20th, 2012, 06:02 PM   #19
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Another new development about to get underway, light industrial/logistics space for the Gift of the Givers organisation in the tradeport.



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Old June 20th, 2012, 06:04 PM   #20
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Thats awesome news actually...
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