search the site
 daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Asian Forums > Philippine Forums > Around the Philippines > Transport, Urban Planning and Infrastructure > Urban Planning



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 28th, 2008, 04:28 PM   #101
allan_dude
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,084
Likes (Received): 7

Forum on Cordillera's development and autonomy held at UC

by Lito Dar


Baguio City (28 July) -- As part of the month-long celebration of Cordillera Month this July, the Regional Development Council held a forum on Cordillera's development and autonomy at the University of Cordilleras (UC) auditorium last week attended by representatives from line agencies and students and faculty of UC.

The forum started with a cultural presentation from UC's KALASAG group, with a theme, solidarity and unity - for CAR's development. After the cultural presentation, an audio visual presentation about Cordillera was shown at the forum.

Mr Fernando Bahatan, a former member of the Cordillera Executive Board, gave a presentation on the historical facts about the Cordillera as he also cited the gains from Executive Order 220 that created CAR. He also shared his and his personal insights on Cordillera's pursuit of autonomy saying this is just and valid, though pursuing it now, at least until 2010, is a 'lost case'.

Meantime, RDC-CAR acting chair and NEDA-CAR director Juan Ngalob, gave updates on RDC's initiatives on Cordillera's regional development and autonomy. On development, Ngalob talked about "regional physical integration", its role and importance in the development of the region.

He also presented the results of the latest pulse survey on the Cordillera regional autonomy. The said survey touched on the failed plebiscites for the Organic Acts, on the discernment process for regional autonomy and on the prospects of a third Organic Act.

As a conclusion on the result of the survey, Ngalob reported that it is not yet time to work out an Organic Act - for autonomy, as there are high level of unawareness on constitutional provision for the creation on an autonomous region in the Cordilleras, as well as inadequate understanding of the substance of autonomy. Relative to this, Ngalob invited the academe to do more studies and research, relative to the issue.

Ngalob also lined-up the RDC's agenda for regional development and autonomy for 2008-2010 and this is summarized by three program thrusts, namely: Information, Education and Communication (IEC); capacitation of prospective regional autonomy implementers and enablers; and program management/policy steering, monitoring evaluation. (PIA)

http://www.pia.gov.ph/?m=12&r=&y=&mo=&fi=p080728.htm&no=17
allan_dude no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 30th, 2008, 02:46 PM   #102
dark_knight_detectve
photographer
 
dark_knight_detectve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: City of Golden Friendship (Cagayan de Oro)
Posts: 4,729
Likes (Received): 177

d/p

Last edited by dark_knight_detectve; May 13th, 2010 at 11:53 AM.
dark_knight_detectve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2008, 05:43 PM   #103
dark_knight_detectve
photographer
 
dark_knight_detectve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: City of Golden Friendship (Cagayan de Oro)
Posts: 4,729
Likes (Received): 177


The Zaragoza World Expo 2008

By Honey Jarque Loop
Saturday, August 2, 2008
Adhering to the Zaragoza World Expo 2008 theme “Water and Sustainable Development,” the 247-square-meter Philippine Pavilion responded with an ultra-modern aquatic design that celebrates the country’s archipelagic character.

The winning proposal by Lor Calma Design Associates in collaboration with the museum development company TAO Inc. brings together a surprising combination of hi-tech equipment and the most traditional, that of industrial bone China materials with avante garde sound art .

On hand to welcome visitors is the amiable “Filipo”, the pavilion mascot symbolizing Donsol’s famous butanding (whale shark) which is inspired by one of the best practices modules presented in the Expo.

The pavilion is designed to transport one in a seeming underwater experience. Blue-lit space with hundreds of transparent spheres are suspended from the high ceiling and figures in bone china and embroidered translucent cloth appear luminous in the darkened pavilion creating a water realm environment.

While the pavilion is consistent to the over-all theme of water and sustainable development, it successfully blends tourism value in the presentation that creates awareness and interest about the Philippines.

“The exhibit’s main theme suits well with our existing promotional strategy for the European market. This is a great opportunity for the DOT to push our country’s water adventures to a hugely European audience,” DOT secretary Ace Durano said.

Video screens are strategically placed showing various Philippine destinations and attractions like Banaue, Baguio, Vigan, Metro Manila and environs, Cebu, Bohol, Camiguin, Davao and top dive sites in Balicasag and Moalboal, with special interest activity such as Butanding (whale shark) encounter in Sorsogon. This information is replicated in various printed promotional materials in both Spanish and English translations for better understanding and appreciation of what the Philippines can offer to the visitors.

The 10 water-related efforts include the conservation efforts in Anilao, Donsol and Tubbataha Reef, watershed custodianship at the Ifugao Rice Terraces, the cultural and social welfare sustainability of Batanes, the geothermal and hydro energy projects in Leyte and other provinces, El Nido Resort’s earth-friendly hotel management, Jewelmer’s pearl farm operations and the steadfastness of the Filipino seaman.

Catering to all the senses, the Philippine exhibit includes the Agua y Olio, (water and oil) a mini-spa that provides a 15-minute traditional massage called hilot. Four experts in this type of treatments attend to about 90 persons a day. It is an ideal remedy for muscle stress, back and neck aches.

The pavilion also has a “Coffee Nook” offering the Travel Café Philippine Drip Coffee and roasted coffee beans for tasting and demonstration on coffee preparations and a corner boutique that showcases handicrafts and merchandizes from top Filipino producers.

In these three months, the Expo Zaragoza 2008 will focus on one of the greatest challenges facing the human race and that is water as a main support for life.

The Philippines in turn makes use of the opportunity to present to a global audience a high level of skill that brings together art, science, community development and tourism that will surely entice the visitors to visit the Philippines.

Back to top
dark_knight_detectve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2008, 05:45 PM   #104
dark_knight_detectve
photographer
 
dark_knight_detectve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: City of Golden Friendship (Cagayan de Oro)
Posts: 4,729
Likes (Received): 177

if im mistaken, kindly pm me.



Benguet LGUs now enjoy shares in nat’l wealth tax


For hosting large-scale operations of mining companies

By DEXTER A. SEE

TUBA, Benguet – Communities hosting the operation of large-scale mining companies in this vegetable-producing and mineral-rich province are now starting to enjoy additional revenues with the release of their shares from the income of mining companies in the past several years.


Two towns, two barangays, and the provincial government stand to receive a total of R49 million as share from the national-wealth tax paid by Philex Mining Corp. here in the first quarter of 2005 and the first three quarters of 2006.

The Local Government Code grants local government units (LGUs) a 40 percent share from the national wealth tax paid by companies exploiting natural resources in their areas, but the release of the funds requires the approval of the Department of Budget and Management (DBM).

For several years now, the national government has not been prompt in releasing the shares of local government units from the national-wealth tax.

As a result, the host communities were deprived of the opportunity to use the funds for projects aimed at improving the living condition of the people in the affected areas.

The towns of Tuba and Itogon, both in Benguet, received more than RR11 million each from the national-wealth tax paid by the mining company, while Barangays Ampucao in Itogon and Camp 3 in Tuba got more than R8.6 million each.

The provincial government got more than R9.8-million share from the national wealth tax, which it would utilized for the implementation of various impact projects.

Tuba and Itogon, together with their barangays, will temporarily receive equal shares from the taxes paid by Philex, pending resolution of a dispute over which municipality has the jurisdiction over the area where the mining company is conducting its operation.

Of the RR50-million national-wealth tax paid by the company, Rizal Province had received RR1 million for hosting the firm’s main office, while the P49 million was divided among the Benguet provincial government, Tuba and Itogon towns, and Barangays Camp 3 and Ampucao.

Local officials are confident that the national government will again release their respective shares from the national wealth tax paid by Philex for the last quarter of 2006 and the first three quarters of 2007.

The release would enable the LGUs to implement immediately their priority projects for the people.

Mining is one of the most lucrative industries in this province, aside from the growing of semi-temperate vegetables.
dark_knight_detectve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 22nd, 2008, 05:38 PM   #105
dark_knight_detectve
photographer
 
dark_knight_detectve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: City of Golden Friendship (Cagayan de Oro)
Posts: 4,729
Likes (Received): 177


The suite life at Baguio Burnham Suites

By Dandi Galvez
Friday, August 22, 2008
As a student living in Baguio City over a decade ago I’ve always found that the best time to go there, contrary to popular belief, was in October. This was semestral break for most of the student population, when Session Road was, on a typical afternoon, uncharacteristically empty — devoid of cars and tourists. This was when you found the real Baguio City. The air gave the right kind of chill, like the kind you’d enjoy under the shade of a tree on a hillside. Most importantly, the city settled back to its slow, casual pace, not having to mind the call of quick commerce that lowlanders would bring during the summer and holiday seasons.

“Actually, any time is a good time to visit Baguio,” says Al Ferrer, general manager of the newest hotel property in the city, Baguio Burnham Suites. And he’s right. This city has become many things to many people. As relaxing as those quiet weeks in October, Baguio is absolutely alive for most of the year. It’s an exciting and vibrant place, well deserving of its title as the country’s premier vacation capital.

Opened nearly a year ago, Baguio Burnham Suites is situated along Kisad Road, right next to Burnham Park. The name of the hotel is no accident, giving broad emphasis to its proximity to the park as well as nearby tourist hot spots, which are literally just minutes away on foot. And if you want to visit some of the malls and commercial districts, hailing a cab is easy and most destinations take less than five minutes.

Burnham Suites makes for a very good starting point for many tourists for the great Baguio experience. Guests can already be treated to a little bit of history when they learn that on the hotel site itself is the former vacation house of President Manuel Quezon, with parts of the original structure still intact behind the building. Right beside the hotel is the historic Our Lady of Lourdes Church. Of course, there’s that great view of Burnham Park and the city from the rooms on the hotel’s front.

Guests can expect facilities and amenities comparable to any Manila or Makati-based hotel. Aside from the classy and well-appointed interiors, Baguio Burnham Suites boasts of 24-hour wireless broadband Internet access and cable television service, a DVD player and LCD TV in all 38 rooms, hot and cold baths, a mini bar — and full air-conditioning. As Al explains, “We found that very important for several reasons. One, during summer it’s important to have an air-conditioning system not only because of the temperature but also to prevent outside factors from coming in such as noise.”

Some of the rooms are located up front, right where the busy Kisad Road is. At the back is Legarda Road, where most of the pubs, bars and restaurants are located. So, expect bands blaring out their music on weekends. It’s all a matter of opening or closing a window to bear the difference and how effectively the rooms can shut out noise from the street below. Not every day is a cold day in Baguio, and having an effective climate control system is most welcome.

The hotel also has a ballroom that can accommodate up to 150 people for social functions and conferences. “We have equipment for seminars, making it easy for clients to deal with us with regards to their requirements,” Al says. “We have a complete kitchen that can service both our coffee shop here at the lobby and at the ballroom for functions. You won’t need to look for a caterer.”

Baguio Burnham Suites is in a unique position to bring the kind of business that one expects from other hotels based in Metro Manila. Al explains: “Since we are a professionally managed hotel, we stuck to the standards of the hotel industry *— that our rooms are what you would also see in Manila or Makati-based hotels — the standard twin-bed rooms, suites with separate parlor, to differentiate us from the common or usual hotels you find in Baguio that were formerly pension houses.”

Al adds: “Having said that, we find that the big players, the corporate accounts, find it very conducive to book with us because it’s like dealing with a Manila-based hotel. It also goes with the way we manage it. The professional management system we apply is the same that they will find in Manila.” Suffice it to say, most clients may find it easier to deal with Baguio Burnham Suites because of its familiarity with most professionally managed hotel properties.

The establishment of this hotel couldn’t have come at a better time, what with Baguio’s centennial celebration just two years around the corner. “By the centennial, we would be well-established as one of the big players in the hotel industry of Baguio,” Al concludes. “We look forward to doing very good business.”

* * *

Baguio Burnham Suites is located at No. 6, Kisad Road, Baguio City. For inquiries or reservations, call (074) 424-2211 to 15, fax at (074) 424-2216, e-mail at [email protected] or log on to www.burnham-suitesbaguio.com or www.-theburnhamsuites.com. Its Manila sales office is at the 11th floor, Raffles Corporate Center, Emerald Avenue, Ortigas Center, Pasig City. Call (632) 915-0055 local 118 or (632) 706-1093 or fax at (632) 915-0905. Baguio Burnham Suites is managed by the Genesis Hotels and Resorts Group.

Back to top
dark_knight_detectve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 31st, 2008, 03:06 PM   #106
dark_knight_detectve
photographer
 
dark_knight_detectve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: City of Golden Friendship (Cagayan de Oro)
Posts: 4,729
Likes (Received): 177


Expressway, La Union airport seen to boost Cordillera growth




By DEXTER A. SEE

BAGUIO CITY – The upcoming operation of the San Fernando airport in La Union and the immediate completion of the 84-kilometer Tarlac-La Union toll expressway will surely perk up tourism, agriculture, and economic development in Baguio City and the entire Cordillera.

The San Fernando airport is expected to resume flight operations by October, this year following the completion of the first phase of the half-billion-peso upgrading project funded by the Bases Conversion and Development Authority (BCDA).

The San Fernando airport is part of the Poro Point Freeport Zone being managed by the Poro Point Management Corp. (PPMC), a subsidiary of the BCDA.

The Tarlac-La Union Toll Expressway Project on the other hand, is being implemented by Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) and will be completed and is expected to be operational by 2011.

Johnny dela Cruz, president of the Baguio-Benguet Chamber of Commerce and Industry Inc. (BBCCII), said the overflowing development in the city which comes as a result of the completion of the vital infrastructure facilities would also benefit the surrounding communities such as the towns of Itogon, La Trinidad, Sablan, and Tuba, all in Benguet.

With the expected influx of investors in Baguio and Benguet and with the operation of the San Fernando airport and the Tarlac-La Union toll expressway, he said, employment will be provided to thousands of people and there will be sufficient opportunities for livelihood that would help uplift the living condition of families in urban centers.

The Tarlac-La Union toll expressway will be connected to the BCDA’s flagship project, the Subic-Clark-Tarlac Expressway (SCTEX).

The entire 94-kilomete SCTEX is now open for commercial operations. Recently, one of the country’s major bus companies, Victory Liner, started taking the SCTEX Clark-Tarlac route to Baguio, cutting travel time from six hours to four hours.

Aside from the reduced travel time, travel will be safer and more convenient as the buses need not take the narrower and sometimes unevenly paved national road. An added bonus for using the SCTEX is the considerable amount of fuel savings due to non-stop driving. It will only be a matter of time before other bus companies and cargo trucks will follow suit.

Dela Cruz said the provision of access is an integral part of the country’s tourism, agricultural and economic development, and SCTEX and the Tarlac-La Union toll expressway, which will be operational soon, would improve the delivery of goods to any part of Northern Luzon in a short time.

Moreover, locators in the economic zone here will now have alternatives in the use of transportation means to bring their products to Clark and Subic via the inter-connected expressways. They could opt to maximize the use of the San Fernando airport which is much nearer to the city. They could cut travel time and expenses in the transport of their products.

Tourism, agricultural, and economic development in Central and Northern Luzon is in an upbeat mood following the full operation of SCTEX.

The Clark-Tarlac segment of the SCTEX opened last July 25, while the Subic-Clark segment started commercial operation last April 28.

Dela Cruz said the development of surrounding communities that could come as a result of improved access will also benefit this city because people will drop by Baguio to enjoy its cool, romantic weather, pine-scented air, and natural scenery.
dark_knight_detectve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 6th, 2008, 03:19 AM   #107
icarusrising
Registered User
 
icarusrising's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 5,469
Likes (Received): 2552

Mayoyao’s deep magic

By Audrey N. Carpio
Sunday, August 31 2008




It was a good night for a war dance.

A full moon reflected its tumescent state in the rice paddies, still wet from a fresh harvest. The dancers, dressed in woven thongs and skirts, braided belts and feathery headdresses, lifted an open palm or spear, depending on the type of ritual and celebration, and moved in and out of the circle, a whirl of red, black and white, to the rhythmic threshing of the gong. They told an ancient tale of headhunters and tribal conflict, of victory and thanksgiving for a bountiful harvest.

We were in Mayoyao, the Cordilleras, and this night in particular our group of travelers had descended into the valleys where 2,000 years before Ifugao ancestors carved out rice terraces on the slopes of these mountains. A modernized Ifugao hut, whose iconic cogon roof had been replaced with red-painted galvanized steel, provided the evening’s shelter. Mayoyao is one of the 11 municipalities of Ifugao, almost all of which have their own set of terraces. Banaue, of course, remains the most famous, with an appearance on the P1,000 bill; but unknown to many, there are terraces beyond Banaue that form a network so extensive that, if placed end to end, they would reach halfway around the world.

After the dance, the performers changed back to their regular attire of pants, T-shirt, Adidas jacket and bolo. Everyone partook of the meal that had been killed just earlier. Pinikpikan involves lightly beating a live chicken so that its blood coagulates and thickens the meat around the wings and neck. After the chicken is taken out of its misery, it is plunged into an open fire to burn off the feathers, then chopped up and cooked in a container. Inhumane or not, the process of making the dish was actually more exciting than the taste of the chicken, which was plain, save for the hint of blood and smoke.

But the tapuy — oh, the sweet tapuy. Our guide JP Alipio, one third of the Cordillera Expeditions group, brought over a few bottles of the rice wine from his personal estate in Baguio, bootlegged in Ginebra bottles. Now this was the stuff: none of that burnt-tasting bitter brew sold at souvenir shops that littered the rim of Banaue. The tapuy had the light red color of a rosé and a natural sweetness to it, and seemed to go down especially well after spitting out one’s moma or betel nut chew.

Impassable is nothing

“I wanted Filipinos to see their country the way a tourist would,” says Alipio, explaining why he puts together these off-the-beaten-path trips to the Cordilleras. “There are so many beautiful places here, each with its own distinct character, language and customs.” Alipio is a true Cordilleran, having grown up in Baguio where he spent a lot of time exploring the outer regions trekking, biking and camping. But the mountains are more than just a playground for this environmental management post-grad; they are his passion and his advocacy; its soil, his own soul. Alipio has investigated issues from tribal wars to pesticide use and has received grants from the National Geographic Society as a Young Explorer to research the Cordillera region, as well as mentored under adventure photographer Gordon Wiltsie.

One of his expeditions for the National Geographic was a hardcore 38-day trek known as the Philippine Central Cordillera Traverse, a trail that connects Benguet to the Mountain Province and ends at Tirad Pass. No wonder, on our mini expedition to Mayoyao, every destination according to our guide was just “30 minutes away” and involved “light trekking.” We took maybe five hours to hike up and down a forested mountain and were blistered, scratched, sweaty and palpitating all the way. I tripped over vines and slipped a few times, and wished I could’ve worn my as yet unbroken-in Hi-Tec Base Element shoes, which are waterproof and would have provided better grip and traction on muddy trails and steep inclines than the battered old pair of sneakers I had on.

But, at the base of the mountain swept an elegant waterfall, its icy waters a salve for our sunburns and a contemplation for our complaints. The photographers of the group whipped out their tripods and shot the rapids while the rest of us splashed around and screamed like children. When hunger struck, a lunch of barbecued chicken, veggies and rice was served on freshly macheted banana leaves (nature provideth). Ben Muni must be thanked for hauling around all the supplies in his gigantic backpack. Ben is the second guide from Cordillera Expeditions, and while not a native of the parts like JP, he could very well be one, as a teacher of anthropology at UP Baguio and a team member of the Central Cordillera Traverse. His extensive knowledge of local culture is outshone only by his ability to crack jokes and lighten people’s spirits.

The third of the Cordillera Expeditions triumvirate is Cherry Malonzo, a med school graduate who has backpacked all over the country and has known JP from their college mountaineering days. She added a woman’s touch to the expeditions, though she is certainly as fit, if not fitter, than the boys, earning her the nickname “Ula the Amazona.” The three are good friends above everything else, and their love for the outdoors is so infectious you can’t help feel like you’ve been traveling buddies for a long time.

The other rice crisis

And after the guides have taken you safely — sometimes holding your hand — through the wilderness, you do feel a sense of gratitude, not just for reaching the destinations but also for the detours along every step of the way. If a 30-minute hike took a few hours, it was because we stopped through villages where children would congregate and want to have their photograph taken, or we paused to hear a hymn sung in the local dialect at a makeshift church, or we interrupted a household’s afternoon routine and asked to try our hand at rice pounding.

Simple as they are, these are the kind of experiences fast becoming extinct in a world where almost everything and everyplace is accessible at a price. Banaue is an example of unplanned tourism gone awry — the supposed Eighth Wonder of the World, the rice terraces there have been neglected and abandoned by younger Ifugao folk who look for more lucrative careers in tourism or in the city, or who have converted them into plots for lodging and shops. Visitors leave the place not with a sense of wonder but often disappointment with the rundown view and the widespread prostitution of native culture. Eventually, the reason for tourists to come to Banaue in the first place will cease to exist.

“Ecotourism” meanwhile has been a marketing buzzword of late and a label slapped on almost any kind of nature-related activity. True responsible ecotourism must minimize its own impact, aid in conservation of the ecosystem, build environmental and cultural awareness and respect, and be sustainable by giving back to the community through jobs and socio-economic benefits. According to many definitions of the term, ecotourism must, above all, sensitize people to the beauty and fragility of nature.

“We have a policy to use only locally produced food and services like guides, transportation and catering,” says Alipio on how they apply the leave-no-trace ethic to their tours. “It makes less business sense, but in the long run the communities not only benefit monetarily, but will start to give more value to the local environment that the explorers come to see.” The people of Mayoyao have learned the lessons of Banaue, and are using the income generated from tourism to save the terraces, which were designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Danger in 2001. Our local guides Leandro Elahe, who joined us on our walks, and Grace, who led the cultural activities, are part of MATTIKHAO (Mayoyao Trekkers, Tour Guides, and Indigenous Knowledge Holders Allied Organization), a group that uses part of their earnings to fund the rehabilitation of the terraces.

A group limited in size — 12 people at the most — also lessens the impact on the environment and its resources. By staying at an Ifugao hut, the demand for inns (and building of new ones) is minimized. “We hope to create a new kind of tourist,” explains Alipio, “a traveler who would much rather stay in a hut than look for five-star accommodations, someone who is respectful of local customs and traditions, someone who will readily eat the local food and drink, dance with the locals, and be mindful of the people and environment they are visiting.” And to address the 10-hours-plus road trip getting there, a portion of the tour fees is donated to planting trees to offset emissions from travel.

Sure, the local practitioners did put on a show for the guests, but it was in the form of performance and theater, not a staged ceremony of sacred ritual that may no longer even be relevant. I believe that at some level it was also for the instruction of the younger generation, the lot of children who might possibly lose interest in their heritage and never be inclined to put on a G-string. The toothless, wrinkled old man who dons his tribal garb to step into the dance is repeating a motion inscribed in memory, singing a song that was never written down, and calling out to the god of the Sky World, who existed long before religion.

We left Ifugao with hopefully little to no trace. But Ifugao no doubt left a huge impact on us.
* * *

Special thanks to Hi-Tec shoes for their sole support. Hi-Tec is available at Rox Bonifacio High Street and SM Department Stores.
Head for the mountains. Visit cordiexpeditions.multiply.com.

Copyright 2007. Philstar Global Corp. All rights reserved. This article cannot be published or redistributed without the permission of the publisher.
__________________
"Shall your brethren go to war, and shall ye sit here?"
icarusrising no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 7th, 2008, 02:34 PM   #108
dark_knight_detectve
photographer
 
dark_knight_detectve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: City of Golden Friendship (Cagayan de Oro)
Posts: 4,729
Likes (Received): 177


Banaue: Window to paradise

RENDEZVOUZ By Christine S. Dayrit
Sunday, September 7, 2008





It is only on a truly dark night that one can see the stars. I whisper this to myself as I marvel at the picturesque sight. Imagine this: I sit on the ragged edge of a bright yellow-green giant rice terraced paddy in Banaue, located at a rising altitude of 5,000 feet above sea level. I am cradled in the embrace of ethereal clouds above that serve as soft pillows and blankets. The crisp mountain air incites an exhilarating surge. My friends and I share tapuy (sweet native rice wine) as we begin to identify the constellations one by one. The night gets deeper, the hooting of the owls and symphony of the cicadas become even more enchanting. This is total bliss.

Banaue, one of the 11 towns of the province of Ifugao, derived its name from Banawol, a night bird that used to dwell in the area. Nestled in the hinterlands of the Cordillera Mountains, 333 kilometers north of Manila, it has an estimated expanse of 400 square miles of rice paddies or terraces that appear like stairways to the sky. They curve and cling to the glorious mountainsides that they embrace.

In December 1995, the World Heritage List of UNESCO listed the Ifugao Rice Terraces — covering 20,000 hectares that span the towns of Banaue, Hungduan, Mayaoyao and Kiangan — as the first living cultural landscape, having been hand-carved by the native Ifugao tribes some 2,000 years ago. Streams and springs found in the mountains were ingenuously tapped and channeled into irrigation canals that run downhill through the rice terraces. The Banaue Rice Terraces is the grandest manmade monument of antiquity not built by slaves. It is believed that its length, if connected end to end, would encircle half the globe, 10 times the length of the Great Wall of China.

It was actually at the recent “Windows to Paradise” extravaganza held at the CCP — where Filipino musical and dance performers were exhibited before officials of various consulates, embassies, hotels, resorts among other stakeholders in the local tourism industry — that my dear friends Clang Garcia, publisher of Colors magazine, ace photographer Yvette Lee and I decided to embark on a local trip to Banaue. Our indefatigable Tourism Secretary Ace Durano and dynamic Undersecretary Edu Jarque encouraged the international community to travel to the country’s priority destinations through native songs and dances. “Windows” transported the enthralled audience to the cities of Laoag and Vigan, bustling streets of Manila and even to the Visayas. Our country has so much to offer to the world. Our Department of Tourism invites the local as well as the international community to experience our sights and sounds and make it their destination of choice. We unanimously decided to visit a destination in our lovely country and Banaue topped our list. Truth is, it was my second time to be in this paradisiacal place.

In retrospect, the very first time was when my best friend and two-time Catholic Mass Media Awardee Bum Tenorio — whose first-ever job was as a researcher-writer for an environmental agency in Lamut, Ifugao in 1991 — brought my sister Michelle and I to Banaue Rice Terraces in 2003. Bum’s familiarity with the terrain aided in our jovial exploration. Unforgettable it was when he broke into song while we crossed a bridge in the middle of the terraces that resembled the one in the film The Bridges of Madison County. With resolute nostalgia, he quoted a line from the movie: “This kind of certainty comes but once in a lifetime.” We giggled like high school girls as we repeated the line, admiring the vast expanse of the terraced paddies. While suspended on the bridge, we brought out camote bread, foie gras in honey orange liqueur and Gruyer cheese from our picnic basket. We became giddier as we felt the tapuy kicking in. That solitary moment in time, surrounded by the exhilarating terraces, felt like knocking at heaven’s door.

The Batad Terraces, forming a breathtaking, amphitheatre-like structure, is one of the best examples of the stone–walled type. Hungduan and Mayaoyao also host a number of these. From the Batad Terraces, we proceeded to the Tapia Falls. We descended down a steep flight of concrete stairs to reach the village of Fubloy, located at the bottom of the valley just 40 minutes away. The sight of the cascading water that dramatically falls from a 40- to 50-foot elevation is awesome. The Mayaoyao rice terraces are just 41 kilometers away from the town of Banaue. Perched in the heart of the Central Cordillera mountain ranges, Mayaoyao is known as “The Land of Eternal Spring.” Stone-walled terraces stretch from the mountain-perched barangay of Chaya to the banks of the legendary Penangah river that flows downstream. Each terrace wall is carefully paved with stones.

The use of differently sized and shaped river stones to shore up terrace walls integrates art and science, a skill so highly esteemed that a good number of the paddy builders have been sought throughout the country to build retaining walls along the nation’s highways and even private residences. Other tourist attractions here are Mt. Ammuyao (being the eighth highest mountain in the country), the fabulous Mahencha and Tenogtog waterfalls, the mausoleum containing bodies of the town’s native warriors and Mt. Nagchayan — a town where Japanese troops under Gen. Yamashita fought fierce battles during WWII.

The best time to visit Banaue is between February and August. February is the beginning of the planting season while July and August, despite the damp weather, is when the grains ripen and turn the otherwise green landscape into fields of saffron and gold. Visitors to the terraces will notice plants with bright crimson leaves planted along the paddy edges. These are used to demarcate property boundaries, as fields are handed over only through family members, generation after generation.

We can never forget how the sun begins to set in Banaue as evening falls and the blanket of stars is strewn across the surreal sky. Like magic, the constellations come alive before our very eyes. There are many things in this world that we take for granted, perhaps because they are just within reach. Yet little do we realize that the most sparkling diamonds are in our very own backyard and yes, we only see the stars when the sky is pitch black. Like a scintillating diamond displayed on the black velvet of a jeweler’s showcase, Banaue is an opulent testimony to God’s grace located right here in our country.

* * *
For further information please call the Department of Tourism.

How to get there: By bus - Autobus (+632-740-7959), Florida Trans (+632-731-5358 or 743-3809), Victory Liner (+632-833-0219). Where to sleep: Philippine Tourism Authority-managed Banaue Hotel & Youth Hostel (+63-74-386-4087 to 88); Native Village Inn, Uhaj Village (+63-916-4056743 or 0908-303-9810).

* * *
E-mail the author at [email protected].
dark_knight_detectve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 7th, 2008, 03:39 PM   #109
dark_knight_detectve
photographer
 
dark_knight_detectve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: City of Golden Friendship (Cagayan de Oro)
Posts: 4,729
Likes (Received): 177

Watershed-protection teams formed

Cordillera teams tasked to check forest destruction

By DEXTER A. SEE

BAGUIO CITY – Alarmed by the rapid pace of forest and watershed denudation, the Cordillera Regional Development Council (RDC) approved the creation of quick-response teams.


The teams are tasked to prevent the destruction of forests and watersheds in the region, particularly at tri-boundary of Benguet, Ifugao, and Mountain Province. They will focus their efforts on identified "hot spots", such as the Mount Pulag, Mount Polis, and Mount Data reservations.

The quick-response teams will be composed of personnel of government agencies, local government units, and non-governmental organizations. The composition of the teams is in recognition of the complexity of the forest-destruction problem that undermines the efforts and capability of the Cordillera office of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR).

The regional DENR office is handicapped by the lack of forest officers and logistics in its efforts to hasten the solution of the forest-denudation problem.

RDC said the teams will tap the services of agencies and organizations whose mandate and mission is to ensure sustainable development through the judicious use of natural resources and maintenance of peace and order.

These include the DENR, Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG), Department of Agriculture (DA), National Irrigation Administration (NIA), National Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP), Philippine National Police (PNP), and local government units.

RDC, the region’s policy-making body, cited the need to address the problem on forest and watershed destruction. It said that if not stopped, watershed destruction could result in the loss of water resources for electricity generation, irrigation for agriculture, industry and household use.

The tri-boundary of Benguet, Mountain Province and Ifugao and other areas such as Mount Pulag, Mount Polis, and Mount Data serve as headwaters of the Agno River, Chico River, and Magat River that support hydroelectric plants for the Luzon grid and irrigation systems in Northern Luzon.

These areas used to be parts of the central Cordillera forests, which were blessed with a rich bio-diversity of wild plants and animals.

RDC said the wanton destruction and conversion of mossy, pine forests into vegetable farms in the "hot spots" have been difficult to control because of the interplay of economic, political, and social factors.
dark_knight_detectve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 9th, 2008, 04:37 PM   #110
allan_dude
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,084
Likes (Received): 7

Firm to explore geothermal energy in Kalinga and Apayao

MANILA, Philippines - A subsidiary of listed holding company APC Group Inc. has been granted the right to explore an area in Kalinga and Apayao provinces for possible geothermal energy development.

In a statement to the Philippine Stock Exchange, APC said subsidiary Aragorn Power and Energy Corp. and partner Guidance Management Corp. were granted a geothermal service contract (GSC) by the Department of Energy.

The area is estimated to have a potential of 120 megawatts to 200 megawatts in power generation.

"Under the GSC, APEC and GMC shall be responsible for geothermal operations which shall include geothermal exploration, development and production," the statement said.

Besides energy-related projects, APC has investments in telecommunications, mining, and manpower outsourcing businesses. - GMANews.TV
allan_dude no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 9th, 2008, 04:39 PM   #111
allan_dude
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,084
Likes (Received): 7

The Ifugao wooden scooter: Pinoy ingenuity at centerstage

By Gloria Tuazon

A TRIBUTE to Filipino ingenuity is the theme of the first wooden scooter race staged apart from other festivities in Banaue, Ifugao.

In the past it was an integral activity of the annual Banaue Imbayah, something that wowed and fascinated the crowd.

In April of 2008 however, these group of men fabricating the wooden scooters and joining races decided to form a group and called it Banaue Rice Terraces Wooden Scooters Organization, headed by president Vicente Dinundon Jr., a 2006 graduate of BS Agriculture of the Benguet State University.

Now 25 years old, he is back home in Banaue to live and continue the tradition of home-based business and "scootering."

The story of the wooden scooter is a tale on its own, too.

These mobile contraptions were once created to serve a need. The men-folk were having a difficult time going to and from their homes to their muyongs up the mountains, often bringing home firewood and crops tended up there. It would often take them hours to walk the distance and carry the load.

This then gave birth to the first scooter. They would push it up the hills and work for the day. Firewood would be strapped along both sides of the scooter and other goods tied at the back.

The ride back home would then be a breeze.

These scooters are fashioned out of wood, minimizing the use of nails. Through time the simple device to ferry firewood and tubers soon became art, their designs and styles becoming more intricate and complicated.

Like the swirling horses on a carnival carousel, today's scooters come in a wonderful array of designs -- horses, tigers, Indian heads, eagles, bululs, anything which catches the fancy of its creator, and most often the birthing of one creation comes with a story.

That makes it the more interesting and valuable.

The forming of the Banaue Rice Terraces Wooden Scooters Organization (BRTWSO) was armed with a concept of showcasing their art. They made a proposition to have their club be registered with Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), which they may also use for livelihood.

With the help of Philippine Tourism Authority (PTA), the first staging of the independent scooter race happened in a two-day activity, to boost the practice. The activity went well after two postponements and they hope it will survive the times.

For now what they need is a "viewdeck," to serve as a showroom of scooters where they can manufacture, assemble and show off their pieces. They are on the process of wooing good-hearted sponsors to help them on this cause, one of which is Gov. Mark Lapid, the incumbent governor of Pampanga.

Vincent Dinundon fashioned and extraordinary scooter out of hardwood, with a Mohawk head in front just above the handlebars. The scooter body is a horse, the mane flying in the wind, all this coated in handsome black and valued at more than P25,000. This was finished in two and a half months, based on a story and Ifugao culture. He named it "Bangkiki."

The story, Dinundon said, is a secret for now. This made it more valuable and harder to part with. But he must. This he humbly sold to Lapid for P8,000 with the hope of being granted the favor of having the viewdeck dream for the club.

The P8,000 he used to pay PTA for the registration fee of P300 for each of the 17 racers because with hard life, even this amount is hard to come by. With this they raced with will and hopes.

The just-concluded race showed the world the ingenuity of these simple people, an art borne out of tradition and necessity to continue and blossom as a valuable art and livelihood. Ifugao is living to its name as a land of wood carvers and sculptors, making masterpieces of imaginative and soulful arts.

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/bag...nterstage.html
allan_dude no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 9th, 2008, 04:42 PM   #112
allan_dude
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,084
Likes (Received): 7

Rehabilitation of ruined Ifugao rice terraces on

To avert rapid deterioration of World-Heritage site

By DEXTER A. SEE


LAGAWE, Ifugao — The Ifugao Rice Terraces and Cultural Heritage Office (IRTCHO) here has lined up activities for the rehabilitation of the damaged portions of the world-famous rice terraces in Hungduan and Mayoyao towns, this province, two of the popular World-Heritage sites.

The rehabilitation work is intended to avert the rapid deterioration of the scenic tourist destination.

Earlier, IRTCHO reported the completion of the rehabilitation of portions of the rice terraces in Bangaan, Banaue town.

The present rehabilitation is focused on the rice terraces in Battad, Banaue town, and Nagacadan, Kiangan town.

The project is in line with the efforts of the local, national, and international groups to restore the rapidly deteriorating Ifugao rice terraces, one of the top tourist destinations of the country.

The Ifugao provincial government forged recently an agreement with farmers organizations at the heritage sites to ensure the continuous maintenance of the restored portions of the terraces.

The agreement obligates IRTCHO to provide expert advice, technical services and financial assistance in the hiring of experts who will supervise the rip-rap work at the eroded rice terraces.

IRTCHO is also required to participate in monitoring the progress of the restoration work and to see to it that the process meets in quantity and quality standards.

The rehabilitation is a part of a bigger effort to preserve the world-heritage sites described by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as a living cultural landscape.

The rice terraces, constructed by great Ifugao ancestors some 2,000 years ago, started to deteriorate when giant earthworms invaded the area and caused massive erosion of the earthen structures.

It was also noted by IRTCHO that illegal settlers from different parts of the Luzon constructed dwellings in the rice terraces, which ruined the natural beauty and grandeur of the heritage sites.

But despite its deterioration, thousands of tourists still continue to flock to this province to have a glimpse of one of the wonders in the world.

UNESCO had warned local and national leaders that it would be forced to recommend the deletion of the rice terraces from the list of World Heritage sites if the deterioration is not stopped.

Provincial officials said a lot has already been done to preserve and restore the original grandeur the rice terraces.

The officials asked stakeholders to help in the efforts for the rehabilitation and restoration of the collapsed portions of the terraces in the next two years.

http://www.mb.com.ph/issues/2008/10/...001136733.html
allan_dude no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 10th, 2008, 11:10 AM   #113
icarusrising
Registered User
 
icarusrising's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 5,469
Likes (Received): 2552

Abra river no longer fit for humans - study
10/05/2008 | 11:11 PM

BANGUED, Abra - The mighty Abra River, one of the five largest rivers in the country straddling from Mountain Province and Benguet as headwaters downstream to Ilocos Sur, is being haunted by pollution.

A probe by the Saint Louis University (SLU) College of Engineering's Applied Research and Development Studies found out that the river, the home of the famous Abra River eel and very dear heritage of the Abreños, is no longer fit for domestic use.

The scientific study "The Abra River system water quality monitoring" by Josephine Aries Dulay, coordinator of SLU's Environmental Research Laboratory that came out in the Northern Luzon Research Journal (2007), found out that "except for temperature, all parameter readings exceeded allowable limits or did not meet minimum required concentrations set forth in DAO 34 for the rivers to be classified AA (public water supply Class I), Class A (public water supply Class II), or Class B (recreational water Class I)."

Meaning, the findings indicate that the river is polluted.

Data sampling for the research was started in October 2004. The sampling was performed on a quarterly basis.

Water samples were taken from different sites along the length of the Abra river and were analyzed in terms of physic-chemical characteristics, which include temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, total suspended solids, total dissolved solids, biochemical oxygen demand, nitrates, lead, mercury, chromium and cyanide concentrations.

The samples were taken from the headwaters in Barangay Guinaoang in Mankayan, Benguet as control sample; then going down stream at the mill outlet, tailings dam spillway, Lepanto bridge, Kayan, Gitlangan, Bulaga, Patungkalew, Banoen, Manabo, Bucay, Bangued, Banaoang, Caoayan and Santa.

"During samplings at the mill outlets and tailings dam spillway, no life forms in these parts of the river were observed," Dulay said.

Dulay also noted an alarming presence of toxic substances. There are high nitrate concentrations, heavy metals and cyanides, she found out.

She attributed the nitrates to fertilizers, domestic and industrial effluents and animal manure.

Heavy metals present are lead, mercury, and chromium in concentrations much higher than acceptable limits. Although these metals are naturally present in the environment, "if found in excessive amounts, they are most likely due to industrial discharges," Dulay explained.

Cyanide has also been found to be in concentrations above the acceptable limits, "especially at the mill outlet and the mine tailings spillway," the study stated.

"Cyanide is the most common chemical used to extract gold from ore despite the fact that leaks or spills of this chemical is extremely toxic to fish, plant life and human beings," it also said.

Cyanide can break down with sunlight and oxygen, but the low amount of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the water hinders it from breaking down. The low DO also means the water cannot support aquatic life.

"Due to the pollution, the river may no longer be able to fulfill its productive and life-sustaining functions as the river's assimilation and self-purifying capacity is greatly impaired," Dulay said.

The Abra River stretches from Mountain Province passing through Ilocos Sur and Abra.

It used to be rich in aquatic resources supporting the needs of the communities it traverses.

Population growth, urbanization, technological advancement, and mining have contributed to the river's pollution, said Dulay.

Aside from the blame on mining, deforestation and slash and burn activities in the upland area, illegal logging and tunnel shoring in mining areas causing soil erosion and river siltation, and use of chemical pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers by the farmers nearby also cause the pollution.

Dulay insisted that while the research may hurt, she studied the Abra river to assess its capacity to receive waste discharge and later recover from the disturbance, to classify the river according to guidelines set by Administrative Order 34 of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

Eye opener

The SLU professor added that the Abra River though still has the capacity to regenerate if proper management of waste disposal is met, sounding that she wants people to open their eyes to the darn reality.

She suggested dredging, like what Marcopper in Marinduque did, which can be done to be able to bring back the ecological system of the riverbeds. She likewise proposed oxidation to destroy cyanide molecules.

Mining operations and environmental protection can go together, Dulay said, but "radical changes in mining practices and stricter government implementation of environmental laws" must be done.

She further said "mining companies (should) utilize available technologies for the treatment of contaminated fresh surface water, efficient on-site reduction of metal and the control, storage, and beneficial utilization of mine tailings. - Sun.Star Baguio
__________________
"Shall your brethren go to war, and shall ye sit here?"
icarusrising no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 12th, 2008, 04:38 AM   #114
allan_dude
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,084
Likes (Received): 7

2 Cordillerans among public service awardees

Lyn V. Ramo

BAGUIO CITY — Two public servants from the Cordillera made it to the Outstanding Public Officials and Employees of the Civil Service Commission (CSC).

A public health official and a English public school teacher from the region were among five individual and two group recipients of the Presidential Lingkod Bayan Award in line with the CSC 108th anniversary.

Dr. Celia Flor Brillantes, Baguio City’s Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit head and Warren Ambat, a teacher at Baguio City National High School received the award on September 19 in Malacañang.

Working outside the box

CSC cited Brillantes for spearheading the creation of the website Bonjing, the first government-run interactive website that dwells on sex education for the youth. The site earned for the country the Best Practices Award in Internet-based public service for young adults, given by the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC).

Brillantes has also inspired health professionals to be of utmost service to the poor. She said in her acceptance speech during a ceremony here Wednesday, “Our work depicts our concern for people, our families and friends.” She added being a true public servant requires innovation, creativity and skills to work outside the box.

Ambat bagged the award for championing the cause of information and communications technology as an approach in teaching and as a tool in improving school systems and processes. As an English teacher unlettered in IT, he improved teaching approaches and style through the use of digital technology.

ICT made his lessons more interesting for him as a teacher, as well as for his students.

The other Lingkod Bayan awardees are Mayor Ricardo Revita of Rosales, Pangasinan; Mayor Roberto Agcaoili of San Mateo, Isabela; Dr. Caesar Saloma, dean of the College of Science, University of the Philippines (UP)-Diliman; the Joint Department of Loans and Credit (DLC) and Information Technology Sub-Sector (ITSS) for the Development of the Electronic Recounting System, Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, Malate; and the UP-Manila’s School of Health and Sciences.

Three other Cordilleran educators made it as semi-finalists, namely Nora B. Amowas, a public school teacher at the Baguio City Special Education Center; Evelyn Joyce Taguiba of the Mountain Province General Comprehensive High School in Bontoc; and George B. Vidal, public elementary school teacher at Quirino Hill Elementary School in Baguio City.

San Ubaldo Esteban of the Bureau of Fire Protection and Regina P. Sarmiento of the Department of Education-Cordillera regional office were semi-finalists in the Dangal ng Bayan and Pag-asa ng Bayan, respectively.

The five national awardees also got plaques from the regional CSC office Wednesday.

CSC also recognized outstanding programs on awards and incentives for service excellence (praise) committees. The honor awards system aims to deliver the highest good to the public, according to CSC Regional Director Danilo Danipog.

http://www.nordis.net/blog/?p=3114
allan_dude no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 12th, 2008, 04:41 AM   #115
allan_dude
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,084
Likes (Received): 7

Aquarium fish to land in Igorot’s dining table

Lyn V. Ramo

BAGUIO CITY — The fish is as big as its aquarium. Literally, this applies to the dory gold or popularly known to pet-keepers as the golden hammerhead fish.



AQUARIUM FISH. Fishery Regional Director Rebecca G. Dang-aoan shows off a school of pangasius or hammerhead shark, simply known as yellow tail catfish fingerling. The agriculture department re-launched the production of said species after it failed to get public acceptance in 1978 and 1982. Photo by Lyn V. Ramo/NORDIS

Cordillera folk will get a bigger view and a better taste of the fish when it lands on the platter, not as the small aquarium fish but as a fillet, with the launching Wednesday at the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) here.

According to BFAR Regional Director Rebecca G. Dang-aoan, the dory gold, a.k.a. cream dory and yellow tail catfish, can grow as big as two kilos in four to six months in a pond.

Since the fish thrives in low temperature, it can be grown in many places in the Cordillera, according to Dang-aoan.

BFAR will embark on hatchery and breeding for the cream dory and envisions to develop areas for its propagation. Private pond-owners and operators shall raise the dory until this is ready for the market.

A study shows a steadily growing market for fish fillet. In the Philippines, an existing annual demand for 5,000 metric tons of dory fillet is being supplied by imported fish from Vietnam, according to Dang-aoan.

Cream dory, pangasius, is a large fresh-water fish indigenous to the Mekong Delta, which include China, Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam.

Dang-aoan told the press Wednesday the fish would be raised in pilot areas where private individuals interested in its production would be tapped. She mentioned the Magat lake behind the dam in Alfonso Lista and Aguinaldo, Kalinga and the Ambuclao fish cage takers as possible beneficiaries of the first dory gold fingerling dispersal.

Dr. Micaela Defiesta of the Food and Nutrition Council said the new fish production venture would provide the needed protein in the Cordillera folk’s diet.

http://www.nordis.net/blog/?p=3113
allan_dude no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 18th, 2008, 05:34 AM   #116
allan_dude
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,084
Likes (Received): 7

DOT promotes Kalinga's "Diddiga", Buguias, Benguet's "Alibay di Badang" festivals

by Lito Dar


Baguio City -- The Department of Tourism (DOT-CAR) is promoting two festivals in the region - Kalinga's "Diddiga" Festival and "Alibay di BADANG" of Buguias, Benguet.

DOT OIC Armi Legaspina, in a Kapihan forum Wednesday stressed that DOT supports LGUs and other related tourism organizations/associations in their tourism endeavors, such as these festivals, by way of marketing and promotion.

The province of Kalinga will be having a "Diddiga" Festival on October 26 to 30 as the Kalingas join the country in celebration of the Indigenous People (IP) month.

The Digdiga has five components, namely the "Sallidummay" Festival and Indigenous trade fair to celebrate the province's pride of "identity"; The Prior Informed Consent (FPIC) Faura to respect and recognize the rights of the indigenous people; the Chico River Festival to protect the Chico River as a heritage site; and the Batok Festival – to relieve a vanished Traditional Art.

Kalinga's Provincial Tourism Council chairperson and National Commission on Indigenous Peoples Provincial Officer Naty Suguiyao explained that "Diddiga" means pride and showing off one's talent, beauty and arts, therefore they will try to showcase Kalinga's best, during the festival.

For the Batok Festival, Suguiyao explained that it would be like a reunion for all the tattooed men and women of Kalinga and through the festival they plan to make a coffee table book, which they will name "voice of the skin." She also announced that they will give some guidelines to the press people, regarding the taking of photographs of the tattooed men/women of Kalinga.

With the Chico river festival, they would put forward the advocacy of the "urgent" need to protect and preserve Chico River, as one of the important watershed cradle in Cordillera.

According to Saguiyao, Chico River is now on an "alarming state", as it is becoming a huge sewage system, degraded and silted. She also stressed the need to protect the river from "ourselves".

Meantime, the Domain of Buguias, Benguet will be having an "Alibay di BADANG" festival on October 27 -31. Festival chair Johnny Carlos explained that "Alibay" pertains to Buguias' customary laws and practices and focus on more productivity, good health and production, while "BADANG" is an IP organization, which means Buguias Ancestral Domain for the Native's Governance.

According to Carlos, aside from the usual cultural shows, they will be promoting carrots and its by-products as Buguias' OTOP. He added that they will also be promoting coffee/bamboo production and organic farming to the local farmers. (PIA)

http://www.pia.gov.ph/default.asp?m=...1018.htm&no=08
allan_dude no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 18th, 2008, 05:44 AM   #117
allan_dude
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,084
Likes (Received): 7

Gov’t allots P5.6 billion for Cordillera projects

Amount earmarked in P1.4-trillion national budget for 2009

By DEXTER A. SEE

BAGUIO CITY — The national government has earmarked at least P5.6 billion for various infrastructure projects in the Cordillera.

The appropriation, which is provided in the 2009 P1.4-trillion national budget, will be used for the rehabilitation and improvement of various roads in the region.

The amount of next year’s allocation for the region is at least 200 percent more than the R2.89 billion allocated this year for various projects in the region..

State-of-the-nation-address (SoNA) infrastructure facilities make up some 95 percent of the programmed projects under the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) to ensure that the commitments of President Arroyo in the region will be completed in or before 2010.

Engineer Mariano Alquiza, Cordillera DPWH director, said Kalinga will get the biggest allocation next year in the amount of R1.77 billion.

Mountain Province, which usually got most of the funds for infrastructure in the past years, will receive R1.44 billion for infrastructure projects, Alquiza said.

Ifugao is expected to get R224.5 million for the implementation of SoNA projects, while Benguet will get at least R721 million for the implementation of various foreign-assisted projects. These include the rehabilitation of the Abatan-Mankayan-Cervantes secondary arterial road which has a total cost of R673 million.

At the same time, Alquiza, who is chairman of the Regional Development Council’s infrastructure committee, said Benguet will also get R438 million for the rehabilitation and construction of damaged national roads, R127 million for road upgrading, R116 million for roads intended to boost tourism, and R20 million more for other infrastructure projects.

Ifugao is set to get R518 million for the implementation of SoNA projects, road upgrading, road opening and construction of missing national road links, roads to enhance tourism, rehabilitation and reconstruction of damaged national roads, and other infrastructure facilities.

Abra will receive R501.8 million; Apayao, R471.1 million; and Baguio City, R80 million. Thje regional office will get R18.5 million for various road projects.

Since 1989, RDC had been constantly lobbying for national recognition of the need to rehabilitate various roads to bring development to the far-flung communities. It crafted the Cordillera Road Improvement Project (CRIP), the blueprint for the region’s infrastructure development, which serves as a basis for funding by foreign and local agencies.

President Arroyo has given priority to the infrastructure development of the Cordillera in an effort to boost tourism, agriculture and economic development. All these projects are geared towards the improvement of the standards of living of the upland people.

http://www.mb.com.ph/PROV20081018138323.html
allan_dude no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2008, 08:21 PM   #118
Igsuonnimo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Greater Manila
Posts: 834
Likes (Received): 52



Photo taken from Tiendesitas
Igsuonnimo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 29th, 2008, 05:32 AM   #119
credge
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Iloilo City
Posts: 25
Likes (Received): 0

image hosted on flickr

ADVANCE HAPPY NEW YEAR !!!

Last edited by credge; December 29th, 2008 at 09:03 AM.
credge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2008, 01:24 AM   #120
SUV111
Sniper08
 
SUV111's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Bacolod City...where smile never fades
Posts: 1,293
Likes (Received): 433

image hosted on flickr
SUV111 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu