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Old June 23rd, 2007, 07:27 AM   #1
Sinjin P.
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Cordillera Administrative Region Infrastructure and Urban Planning

introduction by allan_dude

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CAR


Abra

The Province of Abra is now known as the "Natural Dye Capital of the Philippines" because it is blessed with abundant natural dye-yielding plants. Natural dyes are extracted from the barks, leaves, fruits, and roots of these plants, and used to color food, beverages, textiles, cosmetics, furniture, and pharmaceutical products.

The revival of Abra's dyeing tradition had been the project of former Governor Ma. Zita Claustro-Valera. It started in 1992 with the Katutubong Foundation, Inc., headed by former First Lady Amelita "Ming" Ramos, with the help of designer Patis Tesoro who is renowned for using ethnic designs and fabrics for her haute couture creations.

Another revival project that is related to the province's natural dye industry is loom weaving and embroidery.

Apayao

The province of Apayao boasts its own collection of natural wonders that are otherwise not found in the rest of the Cordilleras. Little wonder that it has been dubbed as “Cordillera’s Last Frontier for Nature Richness.” Here, underground rivers, majestic waterfalls, magnificent lakes hug a unique land that is replete with captivating caves, picture-pretty parks, and exotic wildlife.

Delve deep into underwater splendor being offered by Malabisin Lake and Underground River as well as Waton Subterranean River. Come up the surface to gape at fish and wildlife, which are highly visible in the unpolluted waters of Apayao River. And do stop to admire the myriad of picturesque waterfalls of varying sizes that are found along the river.

Commune with nature and marvel at wondrous sights at the Agamata, Agora, and Anag-Sicapo wildlife sanctuaries. Scale the heights of Mount Solo, the highest peak in Apayao. Stumble into untold discoveries at Purit, Anganupan, Nalvo, and countless other caves that make Apayao a whole lot more than simply interesting.

Benguet

Benguet is the roof of Northern Luzon. It straddles on the Cordillera mountain ranges. Mt. Pulag, second highest mountain in the Philippines, and Halsema Highway, the highest mountain highway system in the country, are located in Benguet. Today it holds claim as the “Salad Bowl of the Philippines” because of the huge production of upland vegetables.

Ifugao

Ifugao is home to a thriving ancient culture and host to the famous rice terraces carved from the base of the mountainsides to the top, which appear to be massive green stairways reaching to the sky. The famous terraces had been inscribed in UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 1995 as “a continuing cultural landscape” and likewise considered by the U.S. Association of Civil Engineers as an engineering marvel built by unschooled and free men not of slave labor.

It was a credit to the inherent wisdom of the Ifugao forefathers that a forest and watershed management system was instituted to help sustain the terraces that serve as the basic food source of the sturdy Ifugaos.

The Ifugao native huts could probably be among the world’s first prefabricated houses that do not use a single nail or metal to fasten their parts.

Kalinga

A glance of the Philippine map will easily reveal the similarity of the physiography of Kalinga to that of a bust of a man akin to former President Ferdinand E. Marcos. The province’s geographic feature is charcterized in the western portion by sharp crested interlinking peaks of the steep slope, isolated flat lands, plateaus, and valleys. The eastern portion has generally rolling, gradually sloping foothills. With interlocking wide tracks of flat lands and flood plains along its main drainage system, this rare geography interposes a great role expected of the province in national development pursuits.

Mountain Province

Mountain Province is known as the “Weaver’s Paradise” due to the presence of various weaving centers sporting different designs that bespeak of the province’s cultural heritage. This was a province that practiced the traditional parliamentary/participatory form of governance as evidenced by the presence of the Dap-ay/Ato, a traditional form of governance led by the respected elders in the community.

Baguio City - Summer Capital Of The Philippines

Source:
nscb.gov.ph
tourism.gov.ph


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Magtour tayo!

Bangued, Abra
image hosted on flickr

by Marjun

Abra Church
image hosted on flickr

by gulliver59
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Old August 28th, 2007, 09:27 PM   #2
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The Cordilleras

An exhausting but very enjoyable trip to exotic locations in Northern Luzon. We covered Banaue, Sagada and Baguio in a period of two days. I think, we spent more time on the road. And these weren't just any kind of roads- these were zigzag, high-altitude, cliff-hanging, pulse-quickening ones!

The views were nothing short of spectacular. What are the best things about this trip? Aside from the stunning vistas of Northern Luzon, they were riding on top of a jeepney at Kalinga, the sumptous beef broccoli, the cave exploration-cum-swimming, and the cozy inn where we stayed. In Baguio we got a good laugh at our sketch portraits.



The Town of Banaue



A portion of the Banaue Terraces



Up close and personal with the rice terraces



My not so girly girl friends and behind them a more panoramic view of the terraces...



The Kalinga Terraces on the way to Sagada...



The Sagada Terraces...



Into the Caves of Sagada...







A house among the limestone formations...



A creepy well just outside of those caves...



Whoever is the Bulol, please stand up and introduce yourself...

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Old August 29th, 2007, 04:47 AM   #3
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NICE PICS!!! thanks!
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Old September 24th, 2007, 03:29 PM   #4
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INQUIRER NORTHERN LUZON
Elusive Cordillera autonomy

Self-rule goal not yet lost on the people
By Maurice Malanes
Inquirer



LA TRINIDAD, Benguet – They did not beat gongs and dance the tadek on Sept. 13 when they commemorated the 21st anniversary of the first peace agreement in the country signed between an armed group and the government under then President Corazon Aquino.

Instead, surviving leaders and members of the Cordillera People’s Liberation Army (CPLA) and the Cordillera Bodong Administration (CBA) sat down with government officials in a “peace and development forum” and reflected on the ultimate aim of what is now known as the Mt. Data Peace Accord of 1986.

That aim was regional autonomy. Although it remains a dream, it has become the cause of those who pushed for the accord.

They still consider autonomy or self-rule, especially in terms of managing and using the region’s land and resources, as the path to peace and development that can check a long history of neglect.

That dream was the desire of the late CPLA chief, Fr. Conrado Balweg, and of his followers when they forged the pact with Aquino.

At that time, the Aquino administration, which promised “democratic space” after strongman Ferdinand Marcos was ousted in a civilian-backed military revolt in February 1986, provided an auspicious opportunity for peace making.

Talking peace

During the signing of the accord in Mt. Data in Bauko, Mt. Province, “we, in a way, taught the national government how to talk peace,” Gabino Ganggangan, CBA secretary general, told the well-attended forum in La Trinidad, Benguet.

“Former President Fidel Ramos himself acknowledged that the government learned a lot from the Cordillera’s peace initiative,” said Ganggangan.

Unlike other armed groups, the CPLA immediately made peace with the government after it was formed in 1986, when its pioneers led by Balweg broke up with comrades in the New People’s Army due to political and ideological differences.

“To set the record straight, those of us who joined the NPA [during Marcos’ martial law regime] did not fight for communism. We fought mainly for our ancestral lands and resources,” Ganggangan said.

He cited how under Marcos, wide swaths of forest and rice lands in Abra, Mt. Province, Kalinga and Apayao were threatened by Cellophil Resources Corp., a paper mill owned by a Marcos crony, and by the planned series of World Bank-funded dams in the Chico River.

Through Marcos’ regionalization law in 1972, the provinces of what is now the Cordillera were politically divided. Benguet, Mt. Province and Abra became part of Region 1 (Ilocos) and Ifugao, Kalinga and Apayao belonged to Region 2 (Cagayan Valley).

This setup, according to Ganggangan, was aimed at “dismembering” the Cordillera, which was regarded as a vital resource base for the national government.

After the separation of the provinces, Marcos’ controversial development programs followed and pushed the likes of Balweg to join the NPA.

The division of the Cordillera and Marcos’ “development” programs led to the “one region, one people” battle cry of Balweg and other Igorot activists.

“This battle cry was the seed of what is now called Kaigorotan consciousness and the dream for regional autonomy,” said Ganggangan.

The desire soon found its way into the peace agreement that Balweg signed with Aquino. To fulfill her pledge to give flesh to the accord, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 220 on July 15, 1987, which gave birth to the Cordillera Administrative Region.

The CAR was established in preparation for its autonomous status. Unfortunately, the Cordillera electorate rejected two proposed autonomy laws in two plebiscites—on Jan. 30, 1990 and on March 7, 1998.

But advocates, including Balweg’s followers and those in government, maintain that the rejection of the proposed laws did not mean the death of autonomy itself.

Juan Ngalob, National Economic and Development Authority regional director, cited lack of information—if not misinformation—for the losses.

Kabayan (Benguet) Mayor Ernesto Matuday, who joined the peace and development forum in Baguio City, agreed.

During the past campaigns before the plebiscites, “I heard that some people came over to my town and butchered a pig but they never informed us about the benefits of regional autonomy,” said Matuday.

“Another reason [for the rejection] was public distrust of some politicians who were already positioning themselves if the autonomous region was created,” said Ngalob, chair of the Regional Development Council (RDC) which is now preparing the ground for another campaign.

Actually just a few steps away, autonomy can still be achieved through a “more scientific approach,” Ngalob said.

He cited a tedious poll survey which the RDC would undertake to determine the reasons the electorates had voted against autonomy. Campaign materials will be prepared based on the survey results, he said.

“Let us take our steps slowly but surely,” said Ngalob. “If the people of Quebec (in Canada) are still not giving up hope in their cause for independence (which began shortly after World War II), why should we easily give up our dream for autonomy after 21 years?”
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Old October 3rd, 2007, 07:38 PM   #5
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Barrio Batad, Banaue, Ifugao Province,CAR

Last January 2007, UST Architecture 4th yr field trip 1st batch
"most awesome trip"















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Old October 23rd, 2007, 03:57 AM   #6
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Arabica coffee industry dev't pushed

Sun.Star

THE development of the Arabica coffee industry is gaining support from various sectors in Cordillera, citing its competitive advantage over other coffee varieties.

This as coffee manufacturers and the academe also pushed for the expansion of areas planted to coffee in the region.

Valentino Macanes, head of the Arabica coffee research and development program for Cordillera, said the production of this coffee variety needs to be improved.

Macanes said the average production of Arabica coffee in Cordillera is only 300 kilograms per hectare compared to the tons per hectare production in other countries.

He said the region should be able to produce at least 1,000 to 2,000 kilos of coffee beans per hectare in order to be competitive.

In Benguet and Mountain Province, areas planted to Arabica coffee is 223.89 and 85.01 hectares, respectively. These provinces are the major producers of the coffee variety in the region.

Macanes said potential expansion area for Arabica coffee in Benguet is 5,965 while Mountain Province has an available expansion area of 4,876 hectares. "These potential expansion areas are not planted with vegetables," he said.

Farmers in the region are more focused on growing vegetables than coffee, which is a contributory factor to the latter's low production.

Lawyer Alipio Castillo III of the Montañosa Coffee Corporation said demand for coffee in the market is unlimited, adding that private and the government sectors' efforts to process, package and market the commodity should be strengthened.

Presidential Assistant for Cordillera Thomas Killip said his office has been advocating for the development of the Arabica coffee industry, taking the advice from President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo that production and development of the industry must be improved.
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Old October 23rd, 2007, 11:37 AM   #7
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Kalinga town dream of joining Cagayan

Artemio Dumlao

TABUK CITY, Kalinga - The residence fo Rizal town in Kalinga is aking to to join the province of Cagayan and become its 29th town.

The town people mentioned peace and order, development neglect, hampered trade and commerce as well as the practice of indigenous justice system as reasons for wanting to pull out from the Cordillera Adminstrative Region.

The people also mentioend that 15 barangays in their town have been left neglected and un-attended by the pronvicial government.

Rizal town came into the spotlight after a demolition at the former Madrigal estate in Malapiat killed 9 squatters and wounded 10 policemen.
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Old December 10th, 2007, 04:12 AM   #8
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Baguio: Mock poll shows low turnout of autonomy takers

Sun.Star Baguio

BAGUIO -- Results of the mock plebiscite done on the provinces of Benguet, Mt. Province and Ifugao showed that only a few of the sample population agree on autonomy for the Cordillera.

Albeit the results of the mock plebiscite in other provinces like Kalinga, Apayao, Abra and the cities of Tabuk and Baguio have yet to be tabulated, National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) Regional Director Juan Ngalob said the partial results showed that those pushing for autonomy have to rethink if plans have to be pursued in the future.

Ngalob meantime said the Regional Development Council (RDC) is in the process of gathering the inputs of stakeholders on the proposal of Baguio Representative Mauricio Domogan that pending the plan for autonomy, amendments to Executive Order 220 should be worked out.

EO 220 is the directive issued by then President Corazon Aquino, which created the Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR).

Ngalob said transforming CAR into a permanent region would help maintain the national line agencies that are assigned in several of the provinces in the region. (Rimaliza Opiña)
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Old December 10th, 2007, 06:42 PM   #9
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NLAQ projects to commence before yearend

by SC Aro

LA TRINIDAD, Benguet -- About P25 million worth of projects for the tramline and cold chain system will be implemented in Benguet and Mt. Province before the year ends, according to the Bureau of Post-Harvest Research and Extension (BPRE).

The agri-infra project is under the North Luzon Agri-Business Quadrangle with Benguet sharing the biggest chunk amounting to more than P45 million. NLAQ is one of the State-of-the-Nation commitments of the present administration aimed to spur agricultural development in the region.

BPRE Senior Science Research Specialist Don David Julian said seven towns in Benguet namely Itogon, Bakun, Atok, Mankayan, Buguias, Kibungan, and Tublay were identified as beneficiaries for the tramline poject in Benguet. The installation of the tramline in Itogon already started.

Mt. Province is likewise a beneficiary of the three tramline projects to be located in three different sites in Bauko.

About P15 million was allotted for the 10 tramlines while the remaining amounts will be used for pre-cooling facilities in the identified areas.

Part of the project is the minimal processing and packaging facility located at the La Trinidad Vegetable Trading Post.

Julian said the cold chain system project for Benguet will be until 2010. Components of the project are cold storage, pre-cooler, mini processing plant, payloader, dump truck and tramline. (PIA-Benguet)
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Old January 11th, 2008, 03:15 PM   #10
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DA funds 6 multipurpose drying pavements in Ifugao

by Dan B. Codamon

LAGAWE, fugao (11 January) -- To boost agricultural production, the Department of Agriculture (DA) has approved the construction of six multi-purpose drying pavement (MPDP) under its Ginintuang Masaganang Ani (GMA) Rice Program in the province this year.

The MPDPs costing P100,000 each will benefit three barangays of Lamut, two barangays of Asipulo and one barangay of Aguinaldo.

The DA provides the P100,000 financial assistance as a grant to the cooperatives or people's organization in the respective barangay beneficiaries while the concerned local government units will assist the beneficiaries in the preparation and perfection of the documents required by the DA- Cordillera Administrative Region as well as help in the monitoring, supervision, construction and inspection of the project.

On the other hand, the beneficiaries will provide the cost of labor and other expenses as counterparts for the completion of the project.

According to Avelino Lunag of the Provincial Agriculture, Environment and Natural Resources Office (PAENRO) here, the Memorandum of Agreement between the DA and the beneficiaries has already been signed and the amount released.

Construction has already began in time for the harvest season this summer, he said.

Lunag also disclosed that as part of its continuing service, the PAENRO assisted by the DA, is currently distributing 350 bags of rice certified seeds and 150 bags of hybrid rice seeds to farmers for the planting season. (PIA-Ifugao)
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Old January 27th, 2008, 03:23 PM   #11
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Cordillera tribes realize why they should not fear tourism

By Vincent Cabreza
Northern Luzon Bureau



BAGUIO CITY -- After years of viewing tourism with suspicion, cultural workers now say Cordillera communities need not fear the tourism industry because it has been instrumental in keeping traditional practices of the country alive.

Benicio Sokkong, the Kalinga-born founder of the first government-sponsored school of living tradition in Baguio, says new generations of Cordillera youth had rediscovered their fathers’ old rituals and magic because of the tourism boom.

As a result, he says, villages had been encouraged to open their doors to foreign and domestic visitors.

Sokkong, 52, an advocate of authentic Igorot culture, lectured at a festival management workshop here that was sponsored by the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) and assisted by experts from the Philippine Education for Theater Arts (Peta).

Using the city’s annual Panagbenga Flower Festival that opens on Feb. 1, and the “Lang-Ay” Festival of Mt. Province as case studies, the workshop offered officials some techniques to help fine-tune their skills in organizing and presenting authentic native festivals, says Purificacion Molintas, director of the Department of Tourism in the region.

The DOT reported breaking the agency’s 2007 target with three million foreign tourists infusing more than P168 billion into the national coffers. Baguio should have earned P2,500 from each tourist who stays for two days, according to Councilor Perlita Chan-Rondez, chair of the city council’s committee on tourism.

To attract more tourists to the summer capital, the DOT has tasked tourism stakeholders with marketing the city jointly with the Poro Point International Airport in La Union, which will open in mid-2008.

But most provinces fear that tourists and government-led tourism will interfere with or change community rituals, Sokkong says. This fear often compelled local governments to stave off or suspend projects that would have strengthened their tourism potentials, he said.

“We are a culture that suffered from invasions. The Spaniards [and the Catholic Church] stopped us from playing our gongs because it was supposed to be un-Christian,” he says.

Dr. Brenda Fajardo, a Peta visual arts educator and workshop lecturer, says Philippine culture had a “multicultural” flavor because it drew from a rich history dating back to pre-Hispanic times, a Catholic Church-controlled Spanish colonial rule that lasted for nearly five centuries, and a 50-year American colonial period.

The traditions these periods helped introduce were immediately “Filipinized,” which is why they lasted this long, Fajardo says.

But towns today are also confronted by the fact that, to new generations of villagers, these rituals have lost their purpose, Sokkong says. He says he piloted the school of living traditions in Baguio in 1999, hoping to reignite the youth’s interest in their parents’ culture.

“The project [which became the Cordillera Music Tutorial and Research Center] was subsidized by the NCCA, but it took me a year just to find people who can teach authentic traditions, rituals and music,” he says.

The school inspired the youth by focusing on Igorot dances and chants, Sokkong says, because music is attractive to the new generation. “They also see that when we perform our dances, we showcase our sense of pride [to visitors].”

Molintas says the festival workshop had become necessary because new interest in community-oriented tourism also required some measure of restraint from the people.

A DOT concept paper for the workshop theorizes a “strong interrelationship of culture and tourism,” but it prefers the “kinder” school of thought that culture can be used for promotional purposes, compared to another advocacy that opposes cultural adulteration through tourism.

According to Fajardo, tourism is inherently an economic activity to both the government and the private sector, “but what is presented to the world is culture.”

“That is dangerous. We cannot commodify our culture,” she says.

She says there were tourism-oriented cultural performances that were staged due to “economic motivations.” As a result, “nawawala ang kahulugan (culture has become meaningless),” she says.

Fajardo says this should not be the inevitable consequence of tourism. Communities can avoid it if they draw up programs that showcase their traditions “using motivations of your own and not the motivations imposed by outsiders,” she says.
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Old January 29th, 2008, 07:38 PM   #12
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Aboitiz allots $200M for dams

By Delmar Cariño
Northern Luzon Bureau



LA TRINIDAD, Benguet -- SN Aboitiz Power Inc. is ready to spend $200 million to rehabilitate Benguet’s Ambuklao and Binga dams.

The rehabilitation would increase the plants’ combined generating capacity to between 175 and 200 megawatts (MW).

Emmanuel Rubio, SN Aboitiz chief executive officer, said the rehabilitation would cover the replacement of Ambuklao’s aging power generators and the repair of Binga’s turbines.

Rubio told the provincial board here recently that the company would prioritize Ambuklao’s overhaul since its power generators were outdated.

He said National Power Corp. (Napocor) and Power Sector Assets and Liabilities Management (Psalm) would turn over the dams’ operations to Aboitiz on June 25.

“We will spend $200 million in assets that are practically not operating, but we are willing to spend to express our sincere decision to become the province’s long-term investor,” Rubio said.

The company is seeking a 25-year special work permit from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources since the dams are in protected forest areas.

“Hopefully, we could renew the permit in view of the amount of investment we will make,” Rubio said.
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Old January 29th, 2008, 07:40 PM   #13
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Kalinga braces for 13th Ullalim Festival

TABUK CITY, Kalinga -- The province braces for its 13th Ullalim Festival with regal festivities of modest budget come February 14.

DTI-Kalinga Provincial Director Grace Baluyan, who is a member of the program steering committee said this year's Ullalim Festival will be a 4-day celebration marking the province's 13th Foundation Day, Feb. 13-16.

Kalinga and Apayao became separate provinces on Feb. 14, 1995 under RA 7878 signed by former Pres. Fidel Ramos.

Starting the 4-day affair will be the municipal and sectoral float parade that leads to the provincial capitol grounds, where the opening rite of the Ullalim Festival will be led by Gov. Floydelia Diasen.

The opening rite is signified by the recital of the Ullalim (Kalinga Epic), followed by the sounding of gongs and native Kalinga dance, tachok.

Each municipality will present its own festival based on its significance and implication. Tinglayan will do the Unoy Rice Festival, Pasil the Salip Festival, Tanudan the Tanudan Festival, Balbalan its Manchatchatong Festival, Pasingan Festival of Pinukpuk and other cultural presentations from Amung Chi Bochong of Lubuagan.

Baluyan said the committee has invited Tourism Sec. Joseph Ace Durano as Guest of Honor and Speaker and other Cordillera Tourism officials led Director Purificacion Molintas as guests.

Highlighting the celebration is the Agro-industrial Fair that offers a variety of Kalinga indigenous crops and products of world demand, under the auspices of DTI-Kalinga.

Other highlights include the 'Provincial Skills Competition' (PSC) for the skilled workers in the province to display their abilities in a friendly competition.

This aims to promote quality development in technical and vocational skills and develop a pool of world-class Filipino workforce whose skills help enhance both their employability and productivity.

This will be participated in by graduates of community-based training program from the municipalities, students from the private and public schools in the province, industry workers, entrepreneur, out-of-school youths, graduates and professionals, graduates from the Technical Educational Skills and Development Authority Provincial Training Center (TESDA-PTC), and even from the group of people with disabilities.

Contested areas which will be conducted in open and youth categories include Information Technology, Welding, Building Wiring, Horticulture, Automotive Servicing, Consumer Electronics, and Indigenous Crafts.

It will likewise showcase demos on beauty care like body massage, facial, foot spa, hair styling and cosmetology.

Martial arts enthusiasts will also be witnessing self defense demonstrations by the Kalinga Colleges of Science and Technology, Saint Louis College of Bulanao and the Philippine National Police.

The inclusion of the PSC in the province's annual major event is in support to the flagship of President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo to create more jobs for the Filipino through the provision and promotion of skills training producing a world-class and competent workforce.

Like the Kalinga legendary washing at the waters of Chico River to end the day's toils, participants and guests to the 4-day Ullalim Festival are invited to take the Chico River white water rafting, a 4-hour exasperating challenge on the Chico rapids.

Baluyan said the province, which is emerging as the new tourism discovery of the Cordillera, aims to develop the annual Ullalim Festival as an attraction, and later have it at the levels of Aklan's Ati-atihan and Cebu's Sinulog festivals.
(PIA Kalinga)
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Old February 7th, 2008, 08:15 PM   #14
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P1.5-M requested to improve Talama tourism view park

TABUK CITY, Kalinga -- In line with the goal to make the province a prime tourist destination in the country, members of the provincial board is requesting Kalinga Congressman Manuel Agyao P1.5 million to fund the improvement of Talama Tourism View Park in Bulanao, this city.

In an interview with Provincial Tourism Officer Grace Kidang, this move of the Sangguniang Panlalawigan (SP) is a big step in developing the area which is a potential tourist spot in the province.

"This is the only place in Kalinga where one could view in one setting the scenic sights of the majestic Chico River, a glimpse of Tabuk Valley, the panoramic agricultural lands of Tabuk and parts of the mountainous upper Kalinga," she said.

The place which is accessible and very near the town center the is also a very suitable site for camping, trekking and other eco-tourism activities.

"This place is also recommended as a stop-over for rafters after an exhilarating white water activity offering them picturesque scenery either in broad daylight or just watch the sunset reflecting in the western portion on the long winding river," she expressed.

She related that led by the Provincial Tourism Council (PTC) president Natividad Suggiuyao, several eco-tourism activities had been conducted in the area where students, government employees and the private sectors attended.

"We are grateful for such initiatives since the appreciation of tourist spots in the province should start from us, so we will know how we could promote and invite our friends from other places to come and see what is proudly Kalinga," she underscored.

In a related development, the SP recently approved a budget of P1.2M from the 20% Development Fund for Eco-tourism Development of the province as part of the Provincial Government's Annual Investment Plan (AIP).

This is in support to the national government's goal of developing tourism potentials in the province as one major economic activity and source of livelihood of the people and revenue source of local government units.
(PIA-Kalinga)
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Old February 7th, 2008, 08:16 PM   #15
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Kalinga seeks funding assistance for 5 infra projects

Tabuk City, Kalinga -- The provincial board here is seeking funding assistance from the Senate for five vital infrastructure projects needed to further develop the agriculture potential of the province, establish transport facilities to propel domestic economy and the tourism industry.

The Sangguniang Pnalalawigan(SP) requested Senator Edgardo Angara to allocate fund in the amount of P10M for the construction of a domestic airport in the province particularly in the city of Tabuk.

The SP resolved among others in Resolution No. 2008-004 authored by Board Member Eduardo Buliyat that Kalinga needs an airport to cater to white water rafters, tourists, cut travel from Manila to Tabuk, and promote trade and commerce.

Another P5.5 million fund allocation was requested from Senator Loren Legarda through SP Resolution No. 2008-011 authored by Board Member Fernando Abay for the improvement of three farm-to-market roads (FMR).

These are the Gobgob-Tangbay FMR needing P3 million, Dilag - San Juan in the amount of P1.5 million, and Cabaruan-Sucbot FMR for P1M.

According to the SP, these barangays have tracts of idle lands suited for agricultural purposes. "If the agricultural potentials of these barangays are developed, the food security program of government could be attained in this part of the country," the proposal states.

Based on reports, these infra projects were severely damaged by typhoons that made the affected barangays isolated up to these days, the SP averred in their resolution approved on January 8 of this year.

Abay also sponsored a bill for the construction of additional multi-purpose pavements in 12 barangays in this city. The SP requested Senator Jinggoy Estrada a total of P5 million to establish agriculture facilities in these barangays.

According to Resolution No. 2008-013, Kalinga is a hybrid rice producing province and the rice granary of the Cordilleras thus the need for drying pavements particularly for barangays Laya West, Calaccad, Ipil, Gogbgob, Balong, Dilag, San Juan, Cabaruan, Cabaritan, Nambaran, Lacnog, and Balawag.

The SP went on to endorse during the same regular session the request of the Barangay Council of Bangad for the rehabilitation of a footbridge across the Chico river connecting the municipalities of Tinglayan and Tanudan. The amount of P933,000 was being sought from Senators Angara and Gregorio Honasan.

To promote the green Philippines program, the aldermen through Buliyat also requested Sen. Legarda to allocate P3M for the improvement of forest parks in the province. The SP believes that improving forest parks could prevent environmental degradation.

Legarda is invited Guest Speaker on the 13th Kalinga Day celebration on February 14.
(PIA-Kalinga)
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Old February 7th, 2008, 08:18 PM   #16
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P10-M training center to rise in Apayao

by L. Lopez

LUNA, Apayao -- Responding to the needs of this fast developing province, the local government of Apayao earmarked P10M this year to finance the construction of a training center in this municipality.

TESDA-CAR Assistant Regional Director Emmanuel Dabalos said Gov. Elias Bulut, Sr. was touched by the inconvenience of his people who need to go to Cagayan and Baguio City for skills trainings.

Dabalos said after their office submitted the memorandum of Agreement (MOA), Gov. Bulut approved the project and immediately released P2.5M for its initial works.

TESDA-Apayao has closely worked with the local government in providing skills to the people of the province under its Sheet Metal Arch Welding (SMAW) program, where trainees undergo 1-month training on metal welding.

Dabalos said their office has now trained two batches of welders numbering to 48, who are now being worked out for jobs at a ship building company in Subic.

The training provided by TESDA even qualifies trainees to work overseas, as two of its trainees now work as welders in Saudi Arabia, Dabalos said.

TESDA is aggressive on the SMAW as part of President Arroyo's Hunger Mitigation and Poverty Alleviation Program, which has sank in the priorities of this province.

Dabalos informed that the provincial government is shouldering allowances of trainees in going to Cagayan and Baguio City, to attend skills trainings.

Other skills provided by TESDA include care giving, butchering and barrista. This program is tied-up with the Anti-poverty Agenda of the local government of Apayao.
(PIA Kalinga)
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Old February 16th, 2008, 01:22 PM   #17
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Benguet develops RP’s first organic potato varieties

By Delmar Cariño
Northern Luzon Bureau
First Posted 18:31:00 02/16/2008

LA TRINIDAD, Benguet -- The thrust toward organic agriculture got a boost with the production of new types of potatoes that Benguet State University (BSU) researchers labeled as “the country’s first organic potato varieties.”

Now available at BSU’s Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center (NPRCRTC) are four potato breeds—Solibao, Gloria Kamaptengan, Tawid and Watwat—that could improve potato production in the highlands.

Organic potatoes are sold at P100 a kilogram in the wet market but the price could go up when sold in high-end markets like supermarkets, says Pat Acosta, an organic farming practitioner.

Dr. Belinda Tadawan, project team leader, says the four potato varieties feature a major component of organic agriculture—the use of genotypes that are resistant to pests and diseases and adaptable to the minimum use of farm inputs.

Tadawan’s team—Donita Simongo, Esther Josephine Sagalla, Janet Pablo, Cynthia Kesia and Charlotte Shagol—developed the varieties after field trials that took three years in six potato production areas in Benguet to finish.

These areas were chosen to represent the varying levels of elevation of farm gardens in order to determine their best adaptive qualities to varying degrees of temperature.

Barangays Balili (1,336 meters above sea level) and Puguis (1,342 meters above sea level) here were chosen to represent the low mountain areas; Barangays Loo in Buguias town (1,638 meters above sea level) and Cabututan (1,588 meters above sea level) in Bakun town, for mid-mountain areas; and Barangays Englandad (2,300 meters above sea level) in Atok town and Sinipsip (2,350 meters above sea level), also in Buguias, for the high mountain areas.

The project’s success was made possible with the help of six farmers who owned the lands where the varieties were tested—Dr. Jose Balaoing, Acosta, Rene Noepe, Alex Cubalit, Toria Lesoc and Johnny Osting.

The project initially chose 55 samples of different potato varieties.

After a series of experiments, 15 varieties were left and subjected to what Tadawan’s team called “multilocational trials” from 2005 to 2007.

The trials, according to Tadawan, studied the varieties’ performance based on yield per hectare, tuber size and resistance to late blight, the most common potato disease in Benguet.

Tadawan says most of the 55 varieties came from the International Potato Center in Lima, Peru, while the rest were locally bred varieties.

All of them were given codes during the study.

The response of the varieties was studied based on the area of cultivation, temperature, relative humidity and soil condition.

The farmers used compost, animal manure, effective microorganisms and biological control in cultivating the varieties.

Of the 55 varieties, the study found four varieties that stood out, having potential yields of seven to 10 tons of potatoes per hectare.

The varieties had strong resistance to pests and diseases and required minimum use of farm inputs.

“Since their cultivation and yield did not rely on the use of chemicals and commercial fertilizers, they are deemed as organic varieties,” Tadawan says.

During the celebration of BSU’s charter day anniversary, farmers were asked to join a contest to name the varieties.

Thus, the variety identified as CIP 13.1.1 became Gloria Kamaptengan; 38.0251.17, Tawid; Phil. 5.19.2.2, Watwat; and CIP 676059, Solibao.

Johnny Dati, NPRCRTC director, says the cultivation of the organic varieties could cut down costs on farm inputs, giving farmers the opportunity to earn more.

The advantage of the province’s farmers is that Benguet remains to be the country’s center of potato production.

The province has 10,964 hectares of land devoted to potato production with an annual average yield of 97,834 tons.

The common potato types are sold between P30 and P35 a kilogram.

“Imagine the income the farmers would derive when a substantial part of agricultural land would be used for organic varieties,” Tadawan says.

She says Benguet supplies 62 percent of the country’s annual potato production. It is followed by Davao (14 percent), Mt. Province (12 percent) and Bukidnon (10 percent).

Dati says a 2004 study showed the high demand for potatoes.

The study found the following breakdown of potato purchases in 2004—Divisoria wholesalers (84,138 metric tons), food chain traders (10,762 MT), Balintawak wholesalers (2,446 MT), and supermarkets, hotels and restaurants (489 MT).
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Old February 25th, 2008, 10:47 AM   #18
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Old March 2nd, 2008, 06:19 PM   #19
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Apayao State U teener picked Miss Solid North at ASCU sportsfest


LINGAYEN – It was an unexpected victory for Hannah Sue Eming of Apayao State University as she romped off with the Miss Solid North 2008 crown last Wednesday night at the Pangasinan State University (PSU) Convention Center in Lingayen besting 13 other candidates from various state universities and colleges in Regions I, II and the Cordillera Autonomous Region

All of eighteen summers, Hannah came like a whiff of fresh wind, smartly and confidently answering the final question tossed to the Magic 7 finalists to capture the nod of jurors and spectators.

A 3rd year BS Education student, the Miss Solid North 2008 did not get any of the minor awards during the pageant night but ended up with the most coveted title, a proof that intelligence weighs more than physical attributes.

First and second runner-ups for the Miss Solid North 2008 were Wendy Lucas of Cagayan State University and Rochelle T. Cayton of Nueva Vizcaya State University.

Governor Amado T. Espino, Jr., represented by Board Member Nestor Reyes, earlier welcomed this year’s Association of State Colleges and Universities (ASCU) delegations who are staging their annual Sports Olympics and Cultural Festival at the Narciso Ramos Sports Center in Pangasinan.

The holding of such event he stressed, upholds unity, resilience, productivity and commitment through the showcase of academic, cultural and athletic potentials of the youth.

Sports competition, literary-musical contest and the beauty pageant were among the highlights of the three day event.
(PIO/Ruby R. Bernardino)

http://pangasinanstar.prepys.com/archives/2008/02/27/apayao-state-u-teener-picked-miss-solid-north-at-ascu-sportsfest/#more-2405
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Old March 7th, 2008, 10:00 PM   #20
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The Cordilleras

CAR


Abra

The Province of Abra is now known as the "Natural Dye Capital of the Philippines" because it is blessed with abundant natural dye-yielding plants. Natural dyes are extracted from the barks, leaves, fruits, and roots of these plants, and used to color food, beverages, textiles, cosmetics, furniture, and pharmaceutical products.

The revival of Abra's dyeing tradition had been the project of former Governor Ma. Zita Claustro-Valera. It started in 1992 with the Katutubong Foundation, Inc., headed by former First Lady Amelita "Ming" Ramos, with the help of designer Patis Tesoro who is renowned for using ethnic designs and fabrics for her haute couture creations.

Another revival project that is related to the province's natural dye industry is loom weaving and embroidery.

Apayao

The province of Apayao boasts its own collection of natural wonders that are otherwise not found in the rest of the Cordilleras. Little wonder that it has been dubbed as “Cordillera’s Last Frontier for Nature Richness.” Here, underground rivers, majestic waterfalls, magnificent lakes hug a unique land that is replete with captivating caves, picture-pretty parks, and exotic wildlife.

Delve deep into underwater splendor being offered by Malabisin Lake and Underground River as well as Waton Subterranean River. Come up the surface to gape at fish and wildlife, which are highly visible in the unpolluted waters of Apayao River. And do stop to admire the myriad of picturesque waterfalls of varying sizes that are found along the river.

Commune with nature and marvel at wondrous sights at the Agamata, Agora, and Anag-Sicapo wildlife sanctuaries. Scale the heights of Mount Solo, the highest peak in Apayao. Stumble into untold discoveries at Purit, Anganupan, Nalvo, and countless other caves that make Apayao a whole lot more than simply interesting.

Benguet

Benguet is the roof of Northern Luzon. It straddles on the Cordillera mountain ranges. Mt. Pulag, second highest mountain in the Philippines, and Halsema Highway, the highest mountain highway system in the country, are located in Benguet. Today it holds claim as the “Salad Bowl of the Philippines” because of the huge production of upland vegetables.

Ifugao

Ifugao is home to a thriving ancient culture and host to the famous rice terraces carved from the base of the mountainsides to the top, which appear to be massive green stairways reaching to the sky. The famous terraces had been inscribed in UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 1995 as “a continuing cultural landscape” and likewise considered by the U.S. Association of Civil Engineers as an engineering marvel built by unschooled and free men not of slave labor.

It was a credit to the inherent wisdom of the Ifugao forefathers that a forest and watershed management system was instituted to help sustain the terraces that serve as the basic food source of the sturdy Ifugaos.

The Ifugao native huts could probably be among the world’s first prefabricated houses that do not use a single nail or metal to fasten their parts.

Kalinga

A glance of the Philippine map will easily reveal the similarity of the physiography of Kalinga to that of a bust of a man akin to former President Ferdinand E. Marcos. The province’s geographic feature is charcterized in the western portion by sharp crested interlinking peaks of the steep slope, isolated flat lands, plateaus, and valleys. The eastern portion has generally rolling, gradually sloping foothills. With interlocking wide tracks of flat lands and flood plains along its main drainage system, this rare geography interposes a great role expected of the province in national development pursuits.

Mountain Province

Mountain Province is known as the “Weaver’s Paradise” due to the presence of various weaving centers sporting different designs that bespeak of the province’s cultural heritage. This was a province that practiced the traditional parliamentary/participatory form of governance as evidenced by the presence of the Dap-ay/Ato, a traditional form of governance led by the respected elders in the community.

Baguio City - Summer Capital Of The Philippines

Source:
nscb.gov.ph
tourism.gov.ph

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