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Old September 6th, 2004, 06:48 PM   #1
New Jack City
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Standard Ceiling Heights Today

What are the standard ceiling heights per floor for office and residential towers these days?

It seems like 50 stories these days have potential to be 1000 footers/305 meter towers.
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Old September 6th, 2004, 09:53 PM   #2
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The real question isn't ceiling heights, it's floor-to-floor heights. Because the amount of space between ceiling and floor-above can vary dramatically.

There's a variation by city depending on height limits, etc.

Offices in Seattle probably average 13' ftf (due to height limits). Biotech labs about 15'. Apartments around 10'.
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Old September 6th, 2004, 10:27 PM   #3
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^
how much is that in meters?
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Old September 6th, 2004, 10:35 PM   #4
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10ft=3.05m
13ft=3.96m
15ft=4.57m
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Old September 7th, 2004, 03:18 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays
The real question isn't ceiling heights, it's floor-to-floor heights. Because the amount of space between ceiling and floor-above can vary dramatically.

There's a variation by city depending on height limits, etc.

Offices in Seattle probably average 13' ftf (due to height limits). Biotech labs about 15'. Apartments around 10'.
Your right, I meant floor-to-floor heights, just didn't word it correctly.

Office is still 13 ft? That's what the WTC Towers had back in the 70's when it was standard, but now they say that's too short because of extra wiring, etc.
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Old September 7th, 2004, 02:14 PM   #6
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for residential buildings in hong kong, it's about 3.00m per floor.
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Old September 7th, 2004, 02:40 PM   #7
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In 2003 the minimum ceiling height in The Netherlands was raised from 2,40m (9.87 feet) to 2,60m (8.53 feet), mainly because of the exepcted average growth of people. Sadly minimum requirements are often being explained as maximum dimensions. Some 2,4m ceilings can feel quite low, especially since our average ranks among the heigest in the world.
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Old September 7th, 2004, 06:11 PM   #8
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so the minimum ceiling height went up in metres but down in feet
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Old September 7th, 2004, 06:25 PM   #9
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Whoops, 2.4 meter happens to be 7.87 feet.
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Old September 20th, 2004, 01:10 PM   #10
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so there are laws for floor-to-floor heights? i never knew that.
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Old September 21st, 2004, 11:15 PM   #11
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yeah, imagine if there werent. youd have developers want to save money by building half floors and have occupiers crawl.
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Old September 25th, 2004, 08:10 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by savethewtc
It seems like 50 stories these days have potential to be 1000 footers/305 meter towers.
I think that is still very rare unless the building had a super huge spire or was something like the Kingdom Centre.
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Old November 5th, 2004, 01:05 AM   #13
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yes there are laws in ceiling heights! Here in Australia we have a minimum height limit of 2.4m floor- ceiling for apartment towers but these days its getting up towards 2.7m. The floor to floor heights for apartments used to be min of 2.6m and now are approx 3m. Eureka in Melbourne has a luxurious 3.2m floor to floor or 2.9m celing height.Recently in brisbane a developer reduced each floor of his resi tower by 15cm from 3m to 2.85m per floor, to save costs on construction but still consisting of 38 floors in the tower which was reduced overall by 10m in height.

As for offices, the 60's and 70's were basically 12ft or 3.6m per floor. Now its edging towards 4m due to cabling and air con ect.
So its gettign really easy to estimate heights of resi towers and office towers. just multiply x3m for resi towers or x4m for office towers.
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Old November 5th, 2004, 01:23 AM   #14
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Floor to Floor for class 5 buildings (offices) in australia are AFAIK at least 3600mm, and regulations for minimum 2700mm floor to ceiling. (Well thats to my understanding.)
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Old June 2nd, 2006, 07:02 PM   #15
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Floor to Floor Hieght Standards

This question relates to floor to floor standards, are there such for residential as well? For the most part I have been sticking to 12' ceilings, I however like to think in unconventional ways when I'm designing, I tried performing a standard net search, but have thus far found nothing. I'm hoping that joining this forum will prove useful.
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Old June 4th, 2006, 10:14 AM   #16
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Why are there laws regulating the floor-ceiling height ? Why does it have to be 2.7m in some countries, when most people are under 1.80m ? Isn't that a bit of a waste ?

Also, does anyone know what exactly the material between each floor is made out of (residential/office) ? There's a steel armature and concrete, what else ? If I look at 2 posts earlier, one said that in Australia it's 3.6m floor-floor and 2.7m floor-ceiling, so there is a 0.9m layer of something in between ? That's huge !!!
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Old June 4th, 2006, 12:46 PM   #17
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/\ its a matter of psychology, i.e there have been studies carried out with people living in commie blocks which have 2.5m floors, which equates to roughly 2m ceilings and what came out was that people are more depressed (eh.. dunno if its really about the ceiling), but it makes sence

what can be between floors, oh well, lots, plumming for example, or airconditioning duckts etc
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Old June 4th, 2006, 05:20 PM   #18
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Zoning controls building height
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Old June 4th, 2006, 05:29 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oracle
Why are there laws regulating the floor-ceiling height ? Why does it have to be 2.7m in some countries, when most people are under 1.80m ? Isn't that a bit of a waste ?

Also, does anyone know what exactly the material between each floor is made out of (residential/office) ? There's a steel armature and concrete, what else ? If I look at 2 posts earlier, one said that in Australia it's 3.6m floor-floor and 2.7m floor-ceiling, so there is a 0.9m layer of something in between ? That's huge !!!
Consider those areas (pathways) where airplanes usually take to land in an airport, if you don't regulate the heights of building the airplane will have a hard time avoiding skyscrapers along that path.

That's why they have zoning of different lots, zoning tell developers how tall the building is allowed, the maximum total floor area the building is allowed and occupancy use of the building.

Materials between fllors:

Basically a floor assembly is composed of the finish flooring (carpet, hardwood, tile, etc.) + concrete + corrugated metal decking (steel building) + beam/girder + fasteners/supports for mechanical, electrical, plumbing, communication systems + hanged ceiling for the floor below.

Sometimes in offices they have raised floor assemblies, this allow for easier manipulation and layout of utility systems specially if floorplans are frequently reconfigured depending on occupancy use. Studies have also shown that air condition and heating blown from the floors are more efficient than blown from the ceiling.

Last edited by D'Transporter; June 4th, 2006 at 05:40 PM.
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Old June 5th, 2006, 06:50 PM   #20
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in most cases you can expect the actual floor to floor to want to be greater than whatever the minimum is... b/c i have yet to see an architect that doesn't want a higher ceiling or a mechanical engineer that doesn't want more room for ducts
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