daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy (aug.2, 2013) | DMCA policy | flipboard magazine
Old February 28th, 2005, 05:31 AM   #1
Alvin
Registered User
 
Alvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: London - Sydney - Jakarta
Posts: 6,024
Likes (Received): 26

The Education Thread

Lets post all news and discussions relating to education in Indonesia here.
I'll take the honor of posting the first news:

UI to use English as medium of instruction
The University of Indonesia (UI) is planning to use English as a medium of instruction beginning the 2005/06 academic year as part of an effort to boost its competitiveness in the globalized world, UI Rector Usman Chatib Warsa said.

"We feel we are not that competent in English now. So, to boost our presence in the global context we will make English a medium of instruction beginning in the 2005/6 academic year," Usman said during a ceremony to mark the university's 55th anniversary in Depok on Sunday.

According to UI spokeswoman Henny Widyadingsih, the preparations for the use of English as a medium of instruction started in 2002 when a number of the university's schools signed collaboration deals with several universities overseas for teaching staff exchange programs.

The overseas universities involved include Singapore's Nanyang University and several universities in Malaysia.

She also said that all UI lecturers would take English proficiency tests, followed by English courses.

The subjects to be taught in English would be determined by each school, with priority being given to subjects related to international affairs, such as the international communications course offered by the School of Communications.

The program would start to be rolled out in early 2006, the second semester of the 2005/6 academic year.

Usman also said the UI was planning to increase the salaries and allowances offered to lecturers and staff to improve overall quality of service.

"We are planning to increase staff salaries and provide more incentives for lecturers. Starting 2006, the university will strive to pay lecturers and professors salaries ranging from Rp 5 million to around Rp 10 million," he said.

The current salaries offered to lecturers and professors at UI range between Rp 2 million and Rp 3 million.

It is hoped that the planned salary and allowances increase will improve the attitudes and morale of staff and lecturers so that they will jettison the old, passive civil service style and become dynamic and active educational service providers, Usman said.

To ensure the success of the plan, the university had prepared a funding mechanism as part of its budget.

"One-third of the university's budget comes from student tuition fees, one third from research and the remaining one-third from the government subsidy," he said.

"However, the government, which is supposed to provide one-third of our budget, is only actually paying around one fifth of what we need. To cover the shortfall, we look for extra money by conducting research and building cooperation with the private sector."

According to Usman, high tax on donations hinders the private sectors from donating money to the university and other state-backed educational institutes.

"The high rate of tax makes them reluctant to donate to the university. Universities abroad rarely face this kind of problem," he said.

Usman said UI and other state universities were holding discussions with the Ministry of Finance with a view to finding a solution to the problem.

"We are also proposing the setting up of a research grant scheme as part of the effort to improve the competitiveness of our researchers," said Usman. (001)
Alvin no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old February 28th, 2005, 08:00 AM   #2
Ara
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Djakarta
Posts: 651
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
According to Usman, high tax on donations hinders the private sectors from donating money to the university and other state-backed educational institutes.
Donation to non-profit institutions should be tax deductible. We should really study the way the States handle non-profit fund raising. Many private universities in the States main source of income does not come from the students or the government. Instead, they get their income from alumni and friends of the university donation and through research and consulting.
Ara no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2005, 12:08 AM   #3
Yamauchi
Awesome User
 
Yamauchi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Emerald City
Posts: 554
Likes (Received): 37

I agree entirely. The majority of American public (and much more private) universities rely on donations as the largest source of their funding. My university, for example, just finished a 3-year endowment drive that ended with $653 million raised.
Yamauchi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2005, 02:12 AM   #4
Alvin
Registered User
 
Alvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: London - Sydney - Jakarta
Posts: 6,024
Likes (Received): 26

which university is that, Yamauchi?
Alvin no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2005, 02:14 AM   #5
Alvin
Registered User
 
Alvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: London - Sydney - Jakarta
Posts: 6,024
Likes (Received): 26

Oh, Yamauchi, on top of that ,I might as well ask you. I'm thinking of doing postgrad study - a Masters first, possibly considering PhD later - in economics, either in the US or UK. What's your take on the best universities there? specifically how do you think the LSE, NYU, Boston Univ. and Cambridge rate?
Alvin no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2005, 07:18 AM   #6
Ara
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Djakarta
Posts: 651
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alvin
Oh, Yamauchi, on top of that ,I might as well ask you. I'm thinking of doing postgrad study - a Masters first, possibly considering PhD later - in economics, either in the US or UK. What's your take on the best universities there? specifically how do you think the LSE, NYU, Boston Univ. and Cambridge rate?
For economics (US): MIT, Harvard, Princeton, Chicago, Berkeley, Stanford, Northwestern
Ara no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2005, 07:20 AM   #7
Ara
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Djakarta
Posts: 651
Likes (Received): 0

Another thing I would like to see is the administration of schools being tougher on students caught fighting. It's rediculous to see students fighting among each other on the street. It's even more rediculous that many universities student fight among each other alos because they are from different faculty. There should be zero tolerance for this in the universities. If you are caught fighting on school grounds, you will be brought before the judiciary committee with the threat of expulsion.
Ara no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2005, 07:59 PM   #8
Yamauchi
Awesome User
 
Yamauchi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Emerald City
Posts: 554
Likes (Received): 37

If money is not an issue for you, I'd go with LSE. Why not Cambridge? From what I've heard, it is a lot like an old private school I used to attend. To be quite honest, it sucked. Wearing a strict uniform every day, being surrounded by pastey English, etc. The other ones I am not really that familiar with. I personally transferred out of that mess and now attend a public state university (KU) because I just can't afford $25,000 a year.

However, if you think the things I described wouldn't bother you, I would try for Cambridge. It is essentially the best University in the world. As Ara stated, MIT has the best economics graduate school in the US. However, getting in is ridiculously difficult. The two choices you mentioned, NYU and Boston U, are both very good options.

Last edited by Yamauchi; March 1st, 2005 at 08:12 PM.
Yamauchi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2005, 08:42 PM   #9
Ara
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Djakarta
Posts: 651
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yamauchi
However, if you think the things I described wouldn't bother you, I would try for Cambridge. It is essentially the best University in the world. As Ara stated, MIT has the best economics graduate school in the US. However, getting in is ridiculously difficult. The two choices you mentioned, NYU and Boston U, are both very good options.
Another thing, many top institutions does not offer master degree. Do your homework, many will give you a master while working on your PhD. However, they will not admit you in if you only go for your Master.
Ara no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2005, 08:47 PM   #10
Yamauchi
Awesome User
 
Yamauchi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Emerald City
Posts: 554
Likes (Received): 37

That's right, many don't.
Yamauchi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 2nd, 2005, 02:13 AM   #11
David-80
Le Nozze di Figaro...
 
David-80's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Planet Earth
Posts: 7,005

Wow, you're in Kansas University. they got pretty good basketball team there.

If you want to learn about Asia pacific from american perspective, I suggest you to enter UH Honolulu. I was in Hpu back then but i learned about asian economic and politic study in my UH class.

cheers
__________________
Intel Inside, Idiot outside
David-80 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 2nd, 2005, 02:36 AM   #12
Yamauchi
Awesome User
 
Yamauchi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Emerald City
Posts: 554
Likes (Received): 37

Yeah, we've got a good basketball team. The current US ambassador to Indonesia graduated from KU, too. Maybe I can get some favors some time.

I had a good friend whom I grew up with that visited UH in Honolulu. He thought it was really cool, but life had other plans for him. I will look into it some time.
Yamauchi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 2nd, 2005, 06:38 AM   #13
Alvin
Registered User
 
Alvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: London - Sydney - Jakarta
Posts: 6,024
Likes (Received): 26

yes, I specifically mentioned those four universities because they're the only ones out of decent universities that offer a straight M.A. course , rather than making you commit to a PhD. But thanks for the comments, folks.

I saw a brief documentary about Cambridge on BBC(? - it could've been Discovery or something else)...yeah, it def looks like an old private boys school that I used to go to. The old victorian buildings etc. I don't know, I think I would prefer being in the middle of cosmopolitan London rather than a town like Cambridge - besides LSE has the best reputation for economics in Europe, right?
Alvin no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 2nd, 2005, 10:37 AM   #14
Ara
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Djakarta
Posts: 651
Likes (Received): 0

Enough is enough. When will the Education Department get serious on this problem?

Brawl between STPDN students injures 11

Yuli Tri Suwarni, The Jakarta Post, Bandung

Eleven youths were injured in a lunchtime brawl that erupted among Public Administration Institute (STPDN) students in Sumedang, West Java, on Tuesday.

A witness said the fight was sparked by a dispute between a second-year student, identified as Simon of Papua, and a fourth-year senior Hasyim Siregar of North Sumatra earlier that morning.

"Simon was caught in the act smuggling in a bottle of alcohol during a class. Hasyim warned him to dispose of the bottle and Simon punched Hasyim," the witness, who would not give his name, told The Jakarta Post.

News of the incident spread and more than 1,000 fourth-year students jeered Simon as he and other juniors, numbering about 3,000, began lunch in the campus dining room.

A food fight denegrated into a full-scale brawl as seniors began throwing plates and glasses at the juniors.

The panicked juniors smashed the dining room's glass front doors as they tried to leave building.

Dozens of lecturers intervened but could not could not stop the fight. They called the Jatinangor Police who broke up the melee.

Eleven students were treated at the campus for injuries ranging from minor cuts and bruises to more serious wounds, Sumedang Police Chief Adj. Sr. Comr. Yoyok Subagyo told the Post after visiting the clinic.

Officers had moved all the fourth-year students off of the campus to prevent further clashes and questioned dozens of students from various grades involved in the incident, Yoyok said.

Violence is not new to STPDN, a state technical college that produces the country's bureaucrats. The institute, which is notorious for imposing military-style discipline on its students, made the headlines in 2003 when SCTV television channel broadcast video footage of a junior student, Wahyu Hidayat, who was beaten to death by seniors.

The Sumedang District Court sentenced 10 STPDN students to between seven and 10 months' jail for the accidental killing of Wahyu.

Earlier in 2000, a junior STPDN student Erie Rakhman also died from beatings by his seniors. Seven students involved in that violence were also jailed.

After the 2003 killing, the government decided to move the institute to Jakarta, where it would share facilities with the Institute of Administrative Sciences.

However, the merger will only occur after the remaining students in the Sumedang campus graduate.
Ara no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 2nd, 2005, 03:14 PM   #15
Alvin
Registered User
 
Alvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: London - Sydney - Jakarta
Posts: 6,024
Likes (Received): 26

Wednesday March 2, 6:01 PM
INTERVIEW:Accenture:Indonesia's Outsourcing Outlook Dim

By Phelim Kyne
Of DOW JONES NEWSWIRES

JAKARTA (Dow Jones)--Indonesia's aspirations to rival China and India as a global corporate services outsourcing destination are stymied by negative perceptions of the country's stability, an Accenture Ltd. (ACN) executive said recently.


Foreign-based corporations are reluctant to risk outsourcing parts of their operations to Indonesia, despite the potential cost advantages, because of the country's recent history of civil unrest and terrorism, said Utoyo S. Nurtanio, an associate partner at Accenture's Indonesian unit.

Bermuda-based Accenture is an international consulting and outsourcing firm.

The riots that struck the capital city of Jakarta in the turmoil prior to the fall of the country's dictator Soeharto in 1998, and the terrorist attacks on the tourist island of Bali in 2002 and against the Australian Embassy in Jakarta in late 2004 have made foreign corporations extremely leery about outsourcing to the country.

"When the (riots) in 1998 happened...basically business was (shut) down for almost two weeks (and) people didn't go to work because of security precautions," Nurtanio said. "For oil and gas companies (which commonly outsource operations), just a half-day system down could translate to millions of dollars."

Foreign corporate aversion to outsourcing to Indonesia means that Accenture reaps the lion's share of its revenue in the country from consulting, with around 20% derived from outsourcing services for Indonesia-based domestic and foreign firms.

Accenture's consulting clients in Indonesia include domestic automobile manufacturing giant Astra International (ASII.JK) and Swiss agrochemical firm Syngenta AG (SYT).

Indonesia's rocky road to parliamentary democracy since the downfall of Soeharto has also tarnished the country's allure as an outsourcing destination.

Indonesia's citizens have embraced their newfound freedoms of expression and assembly with relish, resulting in frequent public protests that exacerbate Jakarta's already notorious traffic jams.

The routine tumult, which hampers corporate productivity and competitiveness, has been accentuated by civil unrest in regions including Aceh and Ambon and the threat of terrorism linked to radical Islamic groups. Such groups have claimed responsibility for a string of deadly bomb attacks in Indonesia in recent years.

Those factors have fostered a non-business-friendly image that Indonesia will require years to shake off, Nurtanio said.

"It needs time for the security stability to be proven to gain back the confidence, so it's very hard to predict how long (that perception) will continue," he said.

Indonesia's relatively small pool of university graduates capable of performing outsourcing tasks, such as systems application development and maintenance, is another disadvantage the county suffers in comparison with China and India.

Successful outsourcing requires firms like Accenture to be able to rapidly expand the scale of their operations and the number of staff who run them, making a large population of technically proficient university graduates indispensable.

"We started in China in 2003 with only a hundred people and in two years we've scaled up to thousands (of employees), likewise in India," Nurtanio said. "(But) if you look at the educational system in Indonesia, the capacity to produce the required number of good quality university graduates...is relatively smaller."



thats why education is important!!!
Alvin no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2005, 08:51 PM   #16
tata
there's no free lunch
 
tata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: JAKARTA
Posts: 2,600
Likes (Received): 2

UI adds economics to int'l class program

The Jakartapost
March 14, 2005

JAKARTA: The University of Indonesia (UI) opened a program for economic studies, which enables students to graduate with a degree from a particular university abroad as well as UI.

The introduction was made at the 2005 international class open house at UI campus in Salemba, Central Jakarta, on Sunday.

In the program, students will spend the first four semesters at UI and will continue the remaining four semesters at the university abroad.

The school of economics has established cooperation with the University of Queensland and University of Melbourne, both in Australia.

High school graduates have to achieve a TOEFL score of at least 500, or IELTS of five and have to pass a series of tests to enter the special program.

Students are required to pay US$1,000 for the admission fee and $2,500 per semester while studying the first two years at UI, while the fee at the extension university would be determined in accordance with the university's policy.

Since 2000, UI has opened international class programs for medicine, psychology, computer science, and engineering. The first batch of students graduated last year. -- JP
__________________
JAKARTA Public Transportation:

Bus Rapid Transportation Database, BRT Part 1, BRT Part 2
tata no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 20th, 2005, 03:57 AM   #17
Alvin
Registered User
 
Alvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: London - Sydney - Jakarta
Posts: 6,024
Likes (Received): 26

RI, U.S. universities strengthen ties
Theresia Sufa, Depok

More than 100 university leaders and professors from 80 higher education institutions in Indonesia and the United States met to discuss how they could strengthen ties and continue to build relations between their respective organizations in a forum that ended on Friday.

The two-day forum, called "Indonesia-USA Bilateral Forum on Higher Education Partnerships: Future Directions," was held at the University of Indonesia's (UI) campus in Depok and hosted by the Ministry of Education's Directorate General of Higher Education.

During the forum, participants discussed successful models of existing Indonesian-international cooperative programs, opportunities for and constraints to cooperation and ongoing initiatives such as the Nusantara International Scholarship, which aims to support 400 Indonesians annually to study for PhDs in the United States.

UI rector Usman Chatib Warsa, who chaired the forum's organizing committee, said most of the funding for the scholarships, estimated at $25 million annually, would not come from the Indonesian government.

"We all know the government doesn't have enough money for that," said Usman. "That's why individual partnerships between universities are essential, especially now that (Indonesian) universities are independent."

He added that the forum hoped to establish a consortium of international donors, possibly from Japan, Australia, Europe and the United States, to finance the project, which aims to increase the number of top-notch scholars in Indonesia. It is estimated that out of around 220 million people in Indonesia, currently less than 7,500 hold PhDs.

The project was first proposed during last year's inaugural forum, held in Washington DC, by Prof. Karl Jackson of the Johns Hopkins University's School for Advanced International Studies.

Throughout the forum, discussions between individual universities also took place on the possibility of implementing concrete academic cooperation in the near future, possibly by establishing joint-degree programs, where a student could obtain U.S. and Indonesian degrees simultaneously.

The forum also sought to establish closer relations between researchers in Indonesia and the United States as part of efforts to increase mutual understanding between the two countries.

Specific attention was also given to formulating concrete assistance for higher education institutions in tsunami-torn Aceh, which was represented by the University of Syah Kuala.

The forum, which was also sponsored by the United States Indonesia Society and the Indonesian Embassy in the United States, was attended by representatives of about 50 universities from all over Indonesia and 30 from the United States.

U.S. universities participating included, among others, the University of Michigan, Johns Hopkins University, Ohio State University, the University of Southern California, the University of Hawaii, the University of Cincinnati and the East-West Center.
Alvin no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 22nd, 2005, 01:43 AM   #18
Alvin
Registered User
 
Alvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: London - Sydney - Jakarta
Posts: 6,024
Likes (Received): 26

guys, need your advice, suggestions, and perspectives. I've been accepted in the economics graduate programmes at Boston University, London School of Economics & Pol Science (LSE) and Cambridge. Still waiting for a reply from NYU. if you were me, which would you choose and why?
Alvin no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 22nd, 2005, 02:38 AM   #19
Yamauchi
Awesome User
 
Yamauchi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Emerald City
Posts: 554
Likes (Received): 37

Dang, lucky you. Congratulations! I wish I could give you some advice, but they're all great choices.

While we're on the subject of asking questions, would any of you in Indonesia recommend I learn Chinese? I've seen that some of the investment-type jobs require that. I know English and Korean, and I'm learning Indonesian and starting to look into Mandarin. It seems like it would make me more competitive in the work force but I'm not sure. Just a thought.

Last edited by Yamauchi; March 22nd, 2005 at 02:58 AM.
Yamauchi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 22nd, 2005, 03:02 AM   #20
sanhen
Urban Monk
 
sanhen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Posts: 2,437
Likes (Received): 2

I am not currently in Indonesia, but I can say this: Go learn chinese. Still an investment.

Even here in Oz it is getting important.
sanhen no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu