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Old November 11th, 2005, 11:47 PM   #81
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i can't imagine living with my professor
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Old November 11th, 2005, 11:49 PM   #82
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This worthless state...if you ever wondered why Oldham doesnt have the retail amenities even though it has the big houses and the money, the reason is most certainly poor, completely ******* outdated infrastructure that is at least 50 years behind population growth. While other cities nourish their edge, upscale and fast growing exurbs with 4 lane highways, schools, and other infrastructure, Oldham just sits there. Its about time they are waking up and realizing the traffic and development potential in this area has huge implications.

I know Buckner crossings has been announced, but when is the last time youve seen a huge retail development sprout up on a 2 lane curvy road? The answer is never, not even in Louisville. So...when the state wakeds up and realizes the economic potential of Louisville suburbs, they may get the roads they need and deserved for over 30 years and the retail and corporate headquarters buildings will follow (hell they are already planning that 1,000 acre corporate office park with a headquarters they should announce soon).

The article on widening roads in Oldham:

http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/...24/1008/NEWS01
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Old November 12th, 2005, 12:02 AM   #83
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I absolutely love these infill projects. They clean up blighted areas and densify their neighborhoods that even just 5 years ago no one would think could ever come back.

When I originally moved to Louisville from Oregon the area around UofL was just awful and didn't seem like it could ever get better. Now Central Avenue has been rebuilt, Churchill Down revamped, the new Kroger shopping center, the Reynolds Lofts, the Pasta Factory Lofts, this apartment project...all of this is leading to a rebirth of the UofL community. It is great to see and it is only picking up steam.

Also the neighborhoods directly east of downtown are also seeing a huge infilling right now, which is also just amazing to see. But really, these are the only two areas I see us doing lots of infill...downtown/Butchertown/east downtown neighborhoods and UofL. (The Highlands alwats seems to have some new project and has always been able to take care of itself) Not that I am complaining...I am hoping as time passes and we redevelop these blighted areas we move on to helping the west end too...maybe get a neighborhood developed in Shippingport when they get River Road extended, et cetera.

So generally speaking, I think we're doing pretty damned good. We've completely turned downtown and UofL around and are reversing the trends of Butchertown with Shippingport a very real possibility soon too. We're on the right track I feel.
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Old November 12th, 2005, 04:06 PM   #84
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louisville wins another..thanks for voting, if yo udid.

http://skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=280688
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Old November 13th, 2005, 05:20 PM   #85
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From the Indy Star:

Honoring 'the greatest'
After nearly a decade of planning and false starts, the Muhammad Ali Center is set to celebrate, in body and spirit, Louisville's most famous son

LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- George King Sr. was a 22-year-old bantamweight when he met skinny 12-year-old Cassius Clay at a Golden Gloves boxing tournament in the basement of the Louisville Service Club on South Fourth Street.
Within weeks, Clay showed up at the gym where King trained in the Grace Presbyterian Church recreation center in Smoketown, on the East End. The kid was all over the place. He teased older fighters. He put thumbtacks on seats. He hid boxing gloves.Clay did a lot of talking and laughing, King noticed. He also did a lot of work, and he got better fast. King was impressed by Clay's talent and industry, his love of people. He laughed at the kid's mischief. But he wasn't convinced.
"I thought, 'He'll never be anything,' " said King, now 73. " 'He talks too much.' "
King laughs at himself now. That skinny 12-year-old, as nearly everyone well knows, jabbed and jabbered his way to unprecedented fame under a new name: Muhammad Ali.
His might be the best-known face in world history. He certainly is the most celebrated native of Louisville, though this river city two hours south of Indianapolis hasn't always been ready to embrace its outspoken, controversial son.
It will next weekend with the opening of the $82 million Muhammad Ali Center. Longtime Louisvillians, including those who knew the man as a young boy, say the center, after years of false starts and fundraising difficulties, will be well worth the wait.
"Absolutely," said Alice Houston, who grew up two doors down from Ali on Grand Avenue in the city's West End. "You can't imagine the pride and happiness that everyone feels for him."
Appointed with 30-foot tile murals of Ali's face on all sides, the six-story center will be introduced next Sunday with a public dedication and community celebration on downtown Louisville's Riverfront Plaza on the Belvedere. Ali, his wife, Lonnie, and Ali's nine children will attend the dedication.
The center will open the next day.
It is heralded as an "educational and cultural global gathering place" that showcases the ideals of its founders, Ali and his wife, and their core values: respect, confidence, conviction, dedication, giving and spirituality.
It certainly is more than a museum. Only 24,000 of its 93,000 square feet is devoted to exhibits. The rest is dedicated to self-realization and accountability and to promoting cross-cultural dialogue and understanding.
Educational programs have been developed in partnership with the United Nations and the University of Louisville. There are 10 theaters and more than 50 interactive stations, and much of it will be accessible online.
All are designed to educate and inspire. The focus is largely on youths, and there is fun to be had. One interactive station allows visitors to spar with Ali.
"Muhammad would never have allowed this if it were just a museum, a place to glorify the man," said Michael J. Fox (no relation to the actor of the same name), the center's president and chief executive officer. "This is not an institution to serve as a monument or shrine. It's to continue his walk.
"There is no other like it, just as there is no other person like Muhammad."
Ali, 63, has Parkinson's syndrome, a neurological affliction doctors attribute to an accumulation of blows to his head, particularly late in his career. The condition affects his speech and motor skills, and, according to daughter Laila, it has worsened recently. Last month, she told the Los Angeles Times: "I have noticed a change in him, something that goes along with Parkinson's. . . . Sometimes his speech is so slurred you can't hardly understand him."
Some days are better than others, his daughter said, and he retains his mental faculties and his humor. Nothing has impeded his engagement in the center's development over the past nine years.
"Lonnie and I wanted the Ali Center to be located in Louisville," Ali said via e-mail through the center. "We were both raised there; it is our hometown. Louisville even has a street named after me! It is where my journey began."
Return to roots

One autumn day in 1954, 12-year-old Cassius and a friend rode their bikes to the Service Club -- a few blocks from where the center would be a half-century later -- for the annual businessman's bazaar. Free treats and balloons were the lure.
Cassius left his new red-and-white Schwinn bicycle outside. When he returned, it was gone.
The tearful boy was led downstairs to the Columbia Gym, to Louisville policeman Joe Martin, who trained fighters there on his own time. Cassius reported the crime and avowed his intention to whup whoever had stolen his bike. Martin asked whether Cassius knew how to fight, then offered to teach him.
Cassius was an 89-pound whippet, but he had found a purpose, a mission. Boxing energized him. It drew him out. Almost from the beginning, he declared he would become the greatest. Less than 10 years later, at age 22, he would defeat Sonny Liston to win the world heavyweight title.
He earned it.
"Columbia opened at 5, and he'd train there for two hours, then he and his brother, Rudy, would walk or ride bikes to our gym and train from 7 till 9," King recalled. "Then he had four or five miles home to Grand Avenue."
Houston's brother, William Kean, was two months older than Cassius. They grew up "playing cowboys together." For a while, they even sparred.
"Until I got tired of getting hit by that jab," said Kean, an ophthalmologist whose sister's son, Allan Houston, retired last month after a 12-year National Basketball Association career.
Kean turned to tennis. He served as Central High School's team captain. He regularly ran with Clay, down Greenwood Avenue toward the river to Chickasaw Park.
"I'd stay and play tennis. He'd go on and do his roadwork," Kean said. "Nobody could outwork him. He'd run several times a day. He'd race the bus to school."
It happened many mornings. The bus would cruise down West Chestnut Street. Clay would streak alongside, his handsome young face a mask of effort. He was always running, always punching, punctuating the lightning stabs of his fists with sharp breaths: "Chuff. Chuff. Chuff." Jab, cross, uppercut, flurries and combinations, flurries of combinations. "Chuff. Chuff."
Clay would graduate from Central No. 376 in a class of 391 in 1960. It didn't matter. He knew where he was going and how.
Helped define '60s

Records are scarce from Ali's amateur years, but according to the Louisville Courier-Journal, he won 100 of his 108 bouts, a couple of which took place in Indianapolis on "Champions in the Making," a boxing show produced by WTTV (Channel 4).
His amateur highlight came at the 1960 Olympic Games, where he won the light-heavyweight gold medal.
His return from Rome was greeted at Louisville's airport, Standiford Field, by Mayor Bruce Hoblitzell, the Central High School cheerleaders and several hundred fans. There was a motorcade to the school and a welcome-home party.
Still, it was 1960. Jim Crow ruled. Segregation was the order of the day. Blacks were refused service in white restaurants. The Olympic champion was black; he was refused service.
The following decade was a tumultuous time, and Ali became one of its controversial symbols. He was bold and voluble, given to street poetry and wild proclamation. He introduced a new concept of athletic celebrity while winning the world heavyweight title three times.
He redefined black self-expression; he was the first rapper. He changed his name from Clay to Ali when he converted to the Islamic faith in 1964, and he refused the draft and military service in 1967 because of his religious opposition to the Vietnam War.
At the height of his career, Ali forfeited his boxing license for 31/2 years. He lost an estimated $10 million in prize money; he stood on principle until the Supreme Court reversed his conviction for draft evasion.
Not everyone liked his bombast. His Islamic ties were viewed with deep skepticism by some. He spoke out on issues. He spoke out on race. He became a lightning rod.
"He spoke up in a time when it was not the thing to do for black people," said Fronda Yancy, a retired educator whose grandmother lived around the corner from Ali's Grand Avenue home. "We were supposed to keep quiet, keep in the background. Stay in your own neighborhood. Be happy.
"He was saying a lot of things we wanted to say."
In 1978, at the height of Ali's worldwide fame, a proposal was put before the Louisville City Council to change the name of Walnut Street to Muhammad Ali Boulevard. According to the Courier-Journal, it passed by a 6-5 vote.
His primary mission

A 3-foot-tall oil painting of Ali resides in the lobby of Central High School. Above it hangs an Ali poster urging students to read. At the far end of the main hall, the school's mascot, a fierce Yellowjacket, adorns the wall. It wears boxing gloves.
Philadelphia has a "Rocky" statue that honors a mythical movie fighter. Louisville has statues representing J. Graham Brown, a hotel owner, and Tom Simons, a businessman, but no monument to Ali.
"I don't think there's been an uproar about it, but I think it's been on people's minds," said Dan Withers, who grew up a couple of blocks from Ali, graduated from Central four years behind him and now serves as the school's principal. "You have someone who's the most famous person in the world. When are you going to recognize him?"
This month, finally, and in a very special way.
Ali has a long history of international activism in human rights, conflict resolution and food for the poor, and the center has become his primary life mission. It is his second career, his legacy, and its significance could far surpass all that he has done before.
He remains devout. He tries to pray five times daily, and the center always is in his prayers.
He and Lonnie, who serves as his spokeswoman, are considering selling their 88-acre farm in Berrien Springs, Mich., and returning to their native city. They want to spend more time at the center.
"This is always something that Muhammad wanted to do, but he had to wait until he retired to pursue it on a more active level," Lonnie said. "His legacy is that he wants people of all religions, all nations, cultures, ages and ethnicities to live as one. Muhammad really hates war and conflict and wants to help find ways to avoid them.
"It is very nice to be part of the Louisville community again."

MUHAMMAD ALI
• Born: Jan. 17, 1942, in Louisville, Ky., as Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. In 1964, he changed his name to Muhammad Ali after converting to Islam.
• Amateur highlights: Records are scarce and inconsistent, but according to the Louisville Courier-Journal, he won 100 of his 108 amateur bouts, culminating in a gold medal as a light- heavyweight in the 1960 Olympics.
• Pro highlights: From 1960 to 1981, he was 56-5 with 37 knockouts. He is the only boxer to win the undisputed heavyweight championship three times, unseating Sonny Liston in 1964, George Foreman in 1974 and Leon Spinks in 1978. He retired in 1981 after losing to Trevor Berbick.
• Personal: He and his wife, Lonnie, live in Berrien Springs, Mich. He has nine children. In 1984, he revealed that he has Parkinson's syndrome.

Muhammad Ali Center
• Address: 144 N. Sixth St., Louisville, KY 40202.
• From Indianapolis: Go south on I-65 for 112 miles. Merge onto I-64 West toward St. Louis. Take Exit 5B toward River Road/Downtown. Turn right onto West River Road, then left onto Sixth Street. Total: 114 miles, about 1 hour and 55 minutes.
• Web site: www.alicenter.org
• Dedication and Community Celebration: 1 to 3 p.m. Nov. 20 on the Belvedere, adjacent to the center. The program will showcase the center's six core values and the presentation of the Sgt. Joe Martin Sr. Award. Speakers will include Muhammad and Lonnie Ali, Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Rep. Anne Northrup, R-Ky., Gov. Ernie Fletcher and Mayor Jerry Abramson. The program is free and open to the public.
• Public opening: Nov. 21.
• Center hours: 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Saturday; noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.
• Admission: Adults, $9; seniors 65 and older, $8; students, $5; children 6-12, $4; groups of 20 or more, $7 each; members and children 5 and younger, free.Muhammad Ali Center

To learn more
For more information on Muhammad Ali and the Ali Center:

Web sites:
• The Muhammad Ali Center: www.alicenter.org/
• Muhammad Ali's official Web site: www.ali.com/
• International Boxing Hall of Fame Ali page: www.ibhof.com/ali.htm

Books:
• "The Soul of a Butterfly: Reflections on Life's Journey," by Muhammad Ali and Hana Ali, Simon & Schuster, 2004.
• "The Muhammad Ali Reader," by Gerald Lyn Early, Ecco Press, 1998.
• "Muhammad Ali: His Life and Times," by Thomas Hauser, Simon & Schuster, 1992.

-- Compiled by The Star Library


I am excited for Louisville. This sounds like it is going to be a wonderful addition to the City. I may be going down on Dec 3 and I will definitely check this out!
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Old November 14th, 2005, 01:58 AM   #86
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Thanks for posting that article C-wilson. That was a great read, supposedly central high school is going to build a statue for him.
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Old November 14th, 2005, 08:51 AM   #87
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Louisville must have been pretty dumb to wait so long to honor its most famous son and the most famous person in the world. Alas, I am finally glad its here, and I don't really think anyone realizes what a huge deal this is for the city, as it will draw an influx of international tourists (even if the place is lame). Good thing the new 21C boutique hotel will open soon across the street, and I really think the Museum Plaza Condo tower should be extended to 40-50 floors and make the first few floors a museum and integrate an upscale hotel along with residential condos at the top. Hmm, maybe I'll attend the meeting Tuesday morning regarding Museum Plaza, where are they meeting and what time?
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Old November 14th, 2005, 10:11 PM   #88
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Recommend a Westin because that would be sweet.

A Museum Plaza in the 40-50 floor range would make the skyline lopsided. I like the 25-35 range better, but that's my opinion.
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Old November 14th, 2005, 10:35 PM   #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gych
Louisville must have been pretty dumb to wait so long to honor its most famous son and the most famous person in the world. Alas, I am finally glad its here, and I don't really think anyone realizes what a huge deal this is for the city, as it will draw an influx of international tourists (even if the place is lame). Good thing the new 21C boutique hotel will open soon across the street, and I really think the Museum Plaza Condo tower should be extended to 40-50 floors and make the first few floors a museum and integrate an upscale hotel along with residential condos at the top. Hmm, maybe I'll attend the meeting Tuesday morning regarding Museum Plaza, where are they meeting and what time?
I don't think the lot size is big enough for the base of a 40-50 story tower. I would love to see a tower of that size in Louisville, I just don't think that spot would be right. 25-30 would be a good size, or around the size of the Humana building.
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Old November 17th, 2005, 12:31 AM   #90
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From Business First today:

"Oakroom receives eighth AAA five-diamond award
The Oakroom, located at the Seelbach Hilton Hotel, has received its eighth AAA five-diamond award.

About 0.26 percent of all 57,000 AAA-rated properties achieve the five-diamond level, AAA's highest rating. Ratings are conducted annually.

The Oakroom is Kentucky's first and only five-diamond restaurant, and is one of 64 restaurants in North America with the status, according to a news release."


And this article from 2001:

"Seelbach's Oakroom again earns AAA's Five-Diamond rating
The Oakroom at The Seelbach Hilton again has been honored with the American Automobile Association's prestigious Five-Diamond rating, according to a news release from the Louisville hotel.

The is the fourth consecutive year the restaurant has received the rating, given to just 51 restaurants in North America this year. The Oakroom is the only Five-Diamond restaurant in a six-state region that includes Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, Missouri, Tennessee and West Virginia, the release said.

AAA ratings are given by a team of professional tourism editors that rate about 41,000 establishments each year for AAA's Tourbooks. "





Take that all those cities around us who think we are inferior A lot of culture in Louisville I tell you! I am on my way to see Wake-up Walmart at the Kentucky Theatre.
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Old November 17th, 2005, 01:24 AM   #91
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the ali center is getting a lot of attention.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=muhammad+ali
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Old November 17th, 2005, 04:00 AM   #92
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Ali Center is gettin some awesome coverage. Just SOME of what comes up on google:

USA Today
http://www.usatoday.com/travel/desti...i-museum_x.htm

MSNBC
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/9850745/

UN website announcement.. thing... haha
http://www.un.org/News/briefings/doc...ter_PC.doc.htm

ESPN
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/box...ory?id=2208641

Houston Chronicle
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/travel/3450970

Washington Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...102800638.html

Sports Illustrated
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/200...seum.bjt.0942/

Chicago Tribune
http://www.chicagotribune.com/travel...chi-travel-hed

Turkish Press
http://www.turkishpress.com/news.asp?id=77611

CBS
http://cbs.sportsline.com/boxing/story/9011706

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
http://pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-.../s_389135.html
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Old November 17th, 2005, 05:58 AM   #93
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^The secret on Louisville is out. The buzz continues to mount. Once again, I hope this place is great, bc it really has the potential to draw a million people a year.

And in other great news, random buildings on Main st are being restored without even my knowledge, and you guys know I follow this stuff close. An old Belknap warehouse on main opposite Whiskey Row is already nearly complete (not sure if it is lofts or office?) Even part of the old "Whiskey Row" is now gated off and they are doing something out front, and in the basement of one of the buildings...is this block finally getting restored? Another one of the buildings in this strip has signs out front saying Contract Pending, meaning someone must be buying it...I have heard from reliable sources that a loft and retail development is very close to being announced here, and that they are awaiting news of the new arena!
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Old November 18th, 2005, 01:01 AM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by springs
For those interested I found this on the museum plaza website.

Alert: Museum Plaza: A New World View Public Discussion with world-renowned architects designing Museum Plaza!

Tuesday, November 15, 2005

Steve Poe, Laura Lee Brown & Steve Wilson are hosting a public discussion featuring Joshua Prince-Ramus, Partner of the Office for Metropolitan Architecture, and his design team. David Mohney, Dean of the University of Kentucky College of Design, will serve as moderator.

The design team of Museum Plaza wants public input on Louisville's new landmark. Louisville is changing and the entire state of Kentucky will benefit as a result of this new addition to Louisville’s skyline. The Office for Metropolitan Architecture has designed signature buildings around the world.
Public discussion: 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM

Seating is limited. Call 502-584-1205 to make reservations.
Gych, did you make it out there?
Did anyone? I'd love to hear how it went.

BTW Good old Actors Theatre of Louisville has done it again with a FABULOUS production of The Crucible. I went Tuesday night and again this afternoon.
We're extremely lucky to have Actors Theatre and if you're ever looking for a good place to go on any regular night of the week, GO SEE A SHOW.
If not to support Louisville's world reknowned theatre, do it cause their shows are just plain good.
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Old November 18th, 2005, 03:27 AM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eweezerinc
Gych, did you make it out there?
Did anyone? I'd love to hear how it went.

BTW Good old Actors Theatre of Louisville has done it again with a FABULOUS production of The Crucible. I went Tuesday night and again this afternoon.
We're extremely lucky to have Actors Theatre and if you're ever looking for a good place to go on any regular night of the week, GO SEE A SHOW.
If not to support Louisville's world reknowned theatre, do it cause their shows are just plain good.
We had a meeting at humana today and my boss is on some committee for the new museum. After our meeting we got to talking about downtown and everything that is going on, well anyways my boss said that they are talking about this thing possibly being 40 stories. These are the exact words that came from his mouth and this man is on some committee that is planning this thing. He said they want to go all out and they are shooting for atleast 40 stories. They want to sell this to the community but he is 90% sure this thing will get built. He hasn't been wrong before but who knows, I hope he is right. 40 stories wow!!! Talk about making a statement, it would be great to get a new arena along with the tower. I hope we can do this without state help because the state will just piss on this project.
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Old November 18th, 2005, 06:48 AM   #96
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The good thing about projects like Museum Plaza is that they need little or no state funding because they already have a group of investors. If this 40 stories that would be awesome, I guess the footprint is bigger than I thought. I'm sure with the world renowned architects involved we can get a very stunning center piece for our skyline.
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Old November 18th, 2005, 11:45 AM   #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by card04
The good thing about projects like Museum Plaza is that they need little or no state funding because they already have a group of investors. If this 40 stories that would be awesome, I guess the footprint is bigger than I thought. I'm sure with the world renowned architects involved we can get a very stunning center piece for our skyline.
I agree this is actually something that I believe will be done before we ever see an arena.
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Old November 18th, 2005, 08:40 PM   #98
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40+ floors? That could translate into a new tallest, or at least rival National City and Aegon...that would be awesome news! Although I fear might make the skyline look a bit off balance...I would much rather have a new tall tower on the empty parking lot next to the old Staples in Fourth Street Live, and make this something more around the height of Humana....but hey, I won't complain too much. Also, this should requre no money from the city or the state,,,this should be paid for with all private fuding...now the mayor I am sure is behind the scenes negotiating, fenangling, and pushing them to do this...and I am sure he can offer some street improvements and such, but not much the city should have to do, in terms of public money.


Anyway, back to the big news of the moment for downtown, The Ali Center


Stars come out for Ali
By Angie Fenton
[email protected]
The Courier-Journal

Hollywood heavyweights will hit the red carpet tomorrow night at the Muhammad Ali Center Grand Opening Gala.

Knockout Angelina Jolie will be in attendance, along with funnyman Jim Carrey and former President Bill Clinton.

Former heavyweight world boxing champion Lennox Lewis and longtime Ali trainer Angelo Dundee will pack a powerful one-two punch in the celebrity lineup. Ali friend and heralded photographer Howard Bingham will be there too.You won't have to wonder where in the world is Matt Lauer -- he'll be on hand for the celebration, as will actor Blair Underwood ("LAX") and broadcaster Bob Costas.

Speaking of media types, Bryant Gumbel and Montel Williams will attend the grand opening, as will Public Radio International's Tavis Smiley, who was honored recently at the fourth annual Robert S. Browne Philanthropist With a Vision Awards gala in New York City.

Rhodes scholar and actor/singer Kris Kristofferson knows a good invite when he gets one, and R&B crooner Ruben Studdard, the 2003 "American Idol," also will be in town for the festivities.

Other music celebs to watch for include Wynonna, BeBe & CeCe Winans, Mavis Staples, Herbie Hancock and James Taylor. Richie Havens is expected, as are Hootie & the Blowfish, who were to perform in Lexington last night.

Opera singer Kathleen Battle will be ringside with spoken-word artist Michael Franti and African songstress Angélique Kidjo.

"Forrest Gump" welterweight Mykelti Williamson -- who starred as Pvt. Benjamin Buford "Bubba" Blue -- will be at the gala, along with broadcaster Sir David Frost.

The political arena will be well represented with Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-Calif.), former Kentucky Gov. John Y. Brown Jr. and, of course, Louisville's own Mayor Jerry Abramson.

And from an arena of a different sort will come University of Louisville men's basketball coach Rick Pitino and Louisville basketball legends Junior Bridgeman and Darrell Griffith.
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Old November 18th, 2005, 10:12 PM   #99
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Degrees on the rise at Kentucky public colleges, universities

Kentucky's public postsecondary institutions awarded 37,371 college degrees, certificates and diplomas during the 2004-05 academic year, an increase of 9 percent from the previous year.

Bachelor's degrees were up 3.3 percent; associate's degrees, 4.7 percent; master's degrees, 4.6 percent; and doctoral degrees, 14.5 percent, according to a news release from the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education.

Certificates increased by 33.6 percent.

Kentucky Community and Technical College System recorded the greatest overall increase, with a 23.6 percent rise in the number of credentials awarded, including a 20.1 percent gain in associate's degrees and a 34.1 percent gain in certificates.

The council's strategic plan for the next five years includes a goal for Kentucky to almost double the number of citizens ages 25 to 64 with at least a four-year degree to reach the national average.

If Kentucky reaches its educational attainment goal of 800,000 working-age citizens with at least a bachelor's degree, it could expect a cumulative $5.3 billion increase in tax revenue and a $71 billion increase in personal income, according to the council's projections
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Old November 19th, 2005, 01:31 AM   #100
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Adaptive reuse and urban infill is spreading to all corners of the metro, just check out one project for New Albany:

http://louisville.bizjournals.com/lo...14/story4.html
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