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Train line extension to south west and north west 57 60.00%
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Old June 27th, 2017, 04:10 PM   #2201
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I've summarised some key points for Canterbury

Canterbury has the most potential in my point of view. The 35 ha. flat Canterbury racecourse site is subject to intense redevelopment, ATC wants mixed use, council wants to turn it into an employment hub/business park. Canterbury racecourse is subject to a separate masterplan.

There are lots of sites with up to 25+ storey zoning, including on Robert St, Broughton St, Aldi and neighbouring properties, East Canterbury and generally around Canterbury Road.

Sydney Metro mentions that Canterbury will get the whole redevelopment of the station into a proper transport interchange. There will be 2 main station exits (one in the East and the other towards Canterbury Racecourse).

The current retail axis on Canterbury Road (with old shopfronts) will shift onto Jeffrey St, Robert St and Broughton St all of which will become the new retail hub/'high street' with 3-5 storey podium base buildings with residential uses above in tower form.

Cooks River Precinct in Canterbury targeted for a $18 MIL funding plan from council to improve recreational facilities, parks and the river edge.

Tons of infrastructure upgrades proposed alongside as well, including a new school.

The industrial lands that sit currently are development sites still in limbo. They are at an awkward phase (eagerly waiting for the Sydenham-Bankstown renewal strategy to finalise), in order to proceed with more ambitious redevelopment proposals. Council is deferring all these proposals until the strategy is finalised.

Also note that Canterbury, Campsie, Belmore and Lakemba are designated priority precincts. The maps shown do not show the density, FSR or height limits because that is under separate 'masterplan style' analysis by DPE. There is strong stakeholder interest from ATC, Aldi/CLK Properties e.g. to intensify and further consolidate the land to the 25+ storey benchmark.

Expect a similar priority precinct process seen in Epping and North Ryde for Canterbury and Campsie.
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Old June 28th, 2017, 07:19 AM   #2202
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtD View Post
The "high-rise boom" has already started in the area around Campsie and Canterbury. The problem now is it's a hodge-podge of buildings mixed in with light industry, with the street itself still untouched. Canterbury Rd is the worst of both words - ugly concrete traffic sewer with powerlines and hideous industry, mixed in with high density apartments that don't suit the area. The whole area needs a scrub-up and the council needs to lift its game.
Yep, Canterbury-Bankstown Council has recognised this and is working with the state government and DPE on a new coordinated Canterbury Road Corridor Review. The process will also result in a new Canterbury Road masterplan. That's why the Canterbury Road corridor is excluded from the Sydenham to Bankstown urban renewal strategy, it is subject to its own masterplan, zoning and land-uses which will be prepared by local and state authorities. The review will also address areas and infrastructure along the corridor with new funding schedules and priorities.
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Old July 1st, 2017, 03:40 AM   #2203
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https://www.domain.com.au/news/devel...1p/?benref=smh


Developer groups push for Australian cities to become more like Asia

NICOLE FROST JUN 29, 2017

When it comes city building, Sydney could learn a thing or two from Asia.

At least that’s the conclusion that a panel of developers and industry figures came to at an event hosted by the Urban Taskforce in Sydney on Thursday.

In particular the evolution of highly-affluent neighbourhoods in Singapore and Shanghai could serve as a road map for housing Sydney’s growing population, said Urban Taskforce chief executive Chris Johnson.

The Shanghai skyline features dramatic skyscrapers. Photo: Zora Zhuang

The panel largely rejected the calls made by former NSW Planning Minister Rob Stokes for Sydney to follow Barcelona’s medium-density approach as opposed to the high-density “Shanghai route”.

Instead they argued for more mixed-use high-density blocks, improved council processes and the need to overcome our fear of Chinese investment.

More mixed-used developments, more efficient approvals

~~~ cont. link
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Old July 2nd, 2017, 07:17 PM   #2204
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I wonder what the details are behind the headline. The article was vague as to what exactly "Sydney" referred to.

I believe in density in city cores, mixed use areas, walkable cities and strong public transport options, but I think it's a stretch to say we must take our lead from Singapore or China in terms of urban development.

While China is a large land mass, it has some 55 times our population. Conversely, Singapore has a land mass some 10,700 smaller than Australia. Both have a density problem.

We, instead, have the option of developing our cities based on lifestyle and economics... and yes, more plants everywhere.
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Old July 12th, 2017, 05:17 AM   #2205
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https://www.domain.com.au/news/five-...15/?benref=smh

***
World's most beautiful Christmas tree goes up in Tokyo
A Christmas tree made from 45,000 glass crystals has gone up in Tokyo, creating a spectacular visual effect as it shimmers in the light
. Video: Craig Platt
***

Opinion

Five lessons from Tokyo, a city of 38 million people, for Australia, a country of 24 million people


BRENDAN F.D. BARRETT, RMIT UNIVERSITY AND MARCO AMATI, RMIT UNIVERSITY JUL 11, 2017

The release of 2016 Census data provides a good opportunity to reflect on the future growth of Australian cities. And what better example of the future to use than Tokyo?

Frequently the subject of futuristic visions, the city went through one of the world’s most rapid post-war population growth periods. The Greater Tokyo area has a population of 38 million – almost 60 per cent more than the population of Australia. Yet Tokyo remains one of the world’s most liveable metropolises.

How can Australian cities replicate this conjuring feat while retaining their own high levels of liveability? We identify five lessons from Tokyo’s experience.

Lesson 1: Manage urban growing pains

Tokyo was devastated at the end of the second world war. The city experienced rapid rebuilding and growth. The population of the central Tokyo prefecture, which is home to 13.5 million people, increased from 3.5 million in 1945 to 11.6 million in 1975.

This 30-year growth spurt happened at a rate almost twice that predicted for Greater Melbourne, for example, from 4.4 million today to 8 million by 2050.

Tokyo’s rapid growth had a number of negative impacts. These included very significant environmental pollution. The basic approach during this period was to grow first and clean up later.

*** cont. link
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Old July 19th, 2017, 04:02 AM   #2206
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http://www.smh.com.au/business/prope...18-gxe018.html

JULY 19 2017 - 11:32AM

High density Sydney: How your suburb rates, according to the 2016 census

Matt Wade


Sydney now has more than 100 suburbs where at least half the population lives in a flat or apartment.

Topping the list for high-density living was Sydney Olympic Park. In that relatively new suburb, 99.9 per cent of the population lives in a flat or apartment, analysis of the 2016 census shows.

Australian census property snapshot
A brief look at how property tenure has changed over the last 25 years.


The next biggest share was in the central business district suburb of Sydney (99.4 per cent) followed by Haymarket (99.3 per cent).

There are now 15 Sydney suburbs where 90 per cent or more of the residents live in a flat or apartment.

A breakdown of census housing data provided to The Herald by the Bureau of Statistics the high-density trend has spread deep into Sydney suburbia.

cont. link incl. interactive map & graph
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Old July 20th, 2017, 12:39 PM   #2207
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from the article
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Old August 8th, 2017, 10:40 AM   #2208
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http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/councils-s...08-gxroi4.html

Good News: eroding planning and approval powers of incompetent, parochial and often corrupt small councils.

AUGUST 8 2017 - 5:03PM

Councils set to lose DA powers 'to guard against corruption'

Sean Nicholls


Councils in Sydney and Wollongong are set to be stripped of the power to consider development applications worth $5 million or more under new rules mandating the use of independent planning panels.

NSW Planning Minister Anthony Roberts announced on Tuesday that so-called Independent Hearing and Assessment Panels (IHAPs) will become mandatory for all councils in Wollongong and Sydney.

[video old news]

The panels are already used by Wollongong council and 15 Sydney metropolitan councils on a voluntary basis.

The government has been considering whether to set a minimum value that would automatically trigger a referral to an IHAP.

RELATED ARTICLES
Government balks at decision to strip councils of powers
Councillors could be stripped of powers on DA approvals


On Tuesday Mr Roberts said it would be mandatory for panels to consider development applications worth between $5 million and $30 million.

Those over $30 million will be dealt with by the regional Sydney Planning Panels whose threshold is presently $20 million.

cont. link
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Old August 13th, 2017, 11:23 AM   #2209
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Quote:
NSW real estate: Sydney suburbs to become high-rise mini-cities under rezoning plans

JORDAN BAKER, EXCLUSIVE, The Sunday Telegraph
August 13, 2017

ENTIRE suburbs are being rezoned for apartments under a government plan to turn once-sleepy residential areas into Singapore-style mini-cities across Sydney.

Under the plan to improve housing affordability, more than 700,000 units in blocks of up to 25 storeys will be built across suburban centres over the next two decades.

But residents fear the government is quietly dumping the bulk of the units in some of the cityís most under-resourced areas, prompting so much anger that planning bureaucrats had to call police to a recent public information session.

Under maps being drawn up for around 40 high rise hot spots, apartment heights will range from three to 25 storeys. In some suburbs, every single street will be up-zoned, and there will be no single dwelling areas left.

Residents and councils worry that while the government is busily working on housing targets, it is not committing to the schools, parks and hospital beds needed to support such a massive population surge.

"The NSW government has said, 'we are going to destroy your suburbs and build new ones with 25-storey towers, but we are not offering anything in exchange'," says Corinne Fisher from Better Planning Network, a community-based group that lobbies for sustainable planning.

"Residents say they donít know whether thereís any point spending money on their houses."

"There is a growing population in Sydney, and they have to be housed somewhere. But whatís happening here are ad hoc, major planning decisions being rushed through without much thought to the quality of the outcomes."

The areas slated for high density development are called priority precincts. They are close to transport and commerce hubs, and the long-term planning will be done by the state government in consultation with councils, rather than leaving decisions to councils alone.

The precincts are scattered across Sydney, from Frenchs Forest to Campbelltown, but the bulk are in the middle of the city, west of the CBD but east of Parramatta and Liverpool.

In the areas slated for rezoning, there is deep uncertainty. Residents say they donít know whether thereís any point spending money on their houses, because it might be sold off and bulldozed.

They might not want to move, disagree with their neighbours about whether to sell, or face the prospect of an 18-storey building towering over their back yard.

Renters fear that they will be kicked out of their homes and struggle to find another in the area. Elderly, non English-speakers worry about being pressured by developers.

"Passions ran so high that officials called police to encourage people to go home."

"These homes are family homes, the owners are older people who donít speak English that well, they have brought their kids up here, they donít want to leave," said Jacqui Pyke, a resident of Earlwood, which will be affected by one of the new precincts.

When residents of the Bardwell Park and Turella precinct met planning officials in Rockdale last month, passions ran so high that officials called police to encourage people to go home. Notices for subsequent meetings have included a plea to treat planning staff with respect.

Last week, about 300 residents of Frenchs Forest packed a local council meeting, furious about the plan to increase density around the local hospital by 3000 dwellings.

There was a similar meeting in Canterbury, with residents worried about the effect of concentrated high-rise on the young, migrant-heavy community.

Plans are most advanced in suburbs along the Sydenham to Bankstown corridor, where the government is aiming to build 35,000 new homes in the next 20 years along its new, high-capacity metro line.

To achieve that target, it is rezoning the region to accommodate 90,000 potential dwellings. But even within that region, some suburbs will be more affected than others.

Residents of the higher socio economic suburbs ó Marrickville, Dulwich Hill and Hurlstone Park ó have successfully lobbied for lower housing targets or more single-dwelling zoning, citing the heritage values of their suburbs.

As a result, even more dwellings will be built in migrant-heavy suburbs further west such as Belmore and Campsie, where every single street is being up-zoned for between three and 25 stories.

The council is worried. Administrator of Canterbury Bankstown, Richard Colley, said investment in the areaís roads, schools and parks was essential to making this workable. "Itís time we started to plan for people first, then buildings, not the other way around."

A recent council report found the Canterbury Road corridor, where much of the building will take place, as "a noisy, polluted and harsh environment, generally unsuitable in its current state for housing."

A spokesman from the Department of Environment and Planning said the city would need 725,000 new homes over the next 20 years. That would require a range of well-designed housing options in the right locations.

"We are losing our community spaces rather than getting more, we are losing our green spaces."

The government was investigating the use of a Special Infrastructure Contribution to help pay for schools, roads, emergency services and open space.

The priority precincts had been chosen because they were close to transport and had broad significance for the community, the spokesman said. The number of schools required would be determined as planning progressed.

The spokesman said concerns about access to parks in the south west would be addressed by providing access to school playing fields after hours and improving existing open space.

Residents were being invited to have their say on the various priority plans through public meetings and written submissions, the spokesman said.

While the apartment-building boom is aimed at helping renters such as Canterbury mum Sharon Baldwin buy a home, to her there are more important things than a title deed.

Parks for her kids, for a start. And hospitals. And schools that arenít overcrowded construction sites. "You wonder who is going to want to live here if there are no services?" she says.

Most of Mrs Baldwinís suburb is being rezoned for high and medium density units. It will contribute 6000 to the 700,000-odd apartments planned for Sydney in the next 20 years.

"We are losing our community spaces rather than getting more, we are losing our green spaces," she says. "Thereís no improvement to the hospital, the schools will be overburdened.

"We want to see some planning before they start throwing up buildings."

To support 35,000 new dwellings (150,000 residents) planned for the south west, the region will need ...
  • 40 new schools
  • 177 new hospital beds
  • 7 new ambulance stations, 6 news fire stations, 5 new police stations
  • 15 new libraries
  • 22.7 new long day care centres
http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/new...e95a9cf91afae3
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Old August 13th, 2017, 04:05 PM   #2210
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Gee, they leap straight to the worst case scenario on every level. No thought of the benefits to those who need housing, just negative, negative and more negative. Some pretty wild claims such as losing their parks; where did they get that from except from wild unsubstantiated hysterical rumour.

As for transport, it is stated right at the beginning that its along the transport lines, especially the metro line yet from what some of those folk have claimed you'd think it was a transport free zone that's involved.

I wonder why these people cannot take a less selfish, more broadminded view, work out their priorities and work with the planners and the government to get the best results for everyone, not what each person wants, but the greater good?

The message that comes through the statements and claims is that, at core, they just do not want change, so a little honesty would be a good place to start.

Let's hope good sense prevails, those opposing work through their denial stage, make good use of the bargaining stage and achieve acceptance of what is best for the greater number and the community as a whole. (Yes, those are the stages of grieving).
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Old August 14th, 2017, 08:13 AM   #2211
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Gee, they leap straight to the worst case scenario on every level. No thought of the benefits to those who need housing, just negative, negative and more negative. Some pretty wild claims such as losing their parks; where did they get that from except from wild unsubstantiated hysterical rumour.

As for transport, it is stated right at the beginning that its along the transport lines, especially the metro line yet from what some of those folk have claimed you'd think it was a transport free zone that's involved.

I wonder why these people cannot take a less selfish, more broadminded view, work out their priorities and work with the planners and the government to get the best results for everyone, not what each person wants, but the greater good?

The message that comes through the statements and claims is that, at core, they just do not want change, so a little honesty would be a good place to start.

Let's hope good sense prevails, those opposing work through their denial stage, make good use of the bargaining stage and achieve acceptance of what is best for the greater number and the community as a whole. (Yes, those are the stages of grieving).
Where do they get the hysteria about parks? Besides that Sydney has a very good range of parks for a city of its size, they forget the parks are almost invariably government owned, and converting them to anything else is not a PLANNING decision but a BUDGETARY decision. Of course scrutinise the government if they ever do announce that, but it is extremely rare.

Planning decisions of themselves do not change the nature of parks, though they may make them more popular as surrounding populations rise. A good thing of course.

And look at the number of new parks - Callan Park used to be a mental hospital now parkland. Barangaroo was a commercial wharf. For Gawds sake.

Sydney people should also get used to using public transport to get to parks - a lot of the gripes I hear aren't about the numbers of people in parks, but the parking.
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Old August 15th, 2017, 06:44 AM   #2212
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People still rage about Barangaroo being theft of public space when it's artificial land and a 200 year old industrial site.
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Old August 15th, 2017, 08:47 AM   #2213
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The really negative thing about high density apartment living is that it kills pet ownership. The vast majority of apartment buildings ban pets, even if you own the bloody apartment.

Not to mention they have paper thin walls and floors so you can hear almost everything being said and done.
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Old August 15th, 2017, 10:15 AM   #2214
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Not in my area! Dogs everywhere! Cats not so much. Joynton Park, the main off-leash park, has peak hour conditions.

Strata rules can be changed though it can be a battle with some self-appointed strata nazis.
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Old August 15th, 2017, 10:18 AM   #2215
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The really negative thing about high density apartment living is that it kills pet ownership. The vast majority of apartment buildings ban pets, even if you own the bloody apartment.
The NSW government has been trying to encourage strata blocks to adopt more pet-friendly arrangements. I have found most newer small and mid-rise blocks typically go "pet friendly".

Large high-rise I don't know, but I can understand where there may be extra concerns.

Older blocks - pre-1996 - well the default by-law was either "no pets" or "no pets with <very small exception and executive committee discretion>". So there's a long ,poor legacy and a big attitude adjustment to foster.
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Old August 15th, 2017, 11:51 AM   #2216
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Lots of pets in our apartment complex.

I agree that they should not allow strata rules to prohibit pets.
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Old August 15th, 2017, 11:54 AM   #2217
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All newer buildings of between 4 & 28 storeys in my area are pet friendly.
Local RE Agents use it as a selling point.
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