search the site
 daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > North East England > Newcastle Metro Area

Newcastle Metro Area For Newcastle, N Tyneside, Gateshead, S Tyneside, South Northumberland



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 29th, 2017, 03:30 PM   #1841
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

4 Castle Street, Warkworth

Standing at the Warkworth Castle end of Castle Street is this Grade II Listed building, photographed 10th May 2017.

Listing text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ https://www.britishlistedbuildings.c...h#.WXyH2emQxtQ

Entry Name: 4, Castle Street
Listing Date: 1 September 1988
Grade: II
Source: Historic England
Source ID: 1371228
English Heritage Legacy ID: 237165
Location: Warkworth, Northumberland, NE65
County: Northumberland
Parish: Warkworth

WARKWORTH CASTLE STREET (West side) No. 4
NU 2405
22/274

House. C17 or earlier, altered.

Rubble with massive roughly-shaped quoins and cut dressings; C20 synthetic blue slate roof with yellow brick stack. L-plan.

2 storeys, 3 irregular bays. Left of centre renewed 6-panel door with overlight; late C20 glazing in early C19 openings, those in right bay formed by enlargement of old mullioned windows; jambs of blocked doorway below ground floor left window. Raised reverse-stepped coping to right end gable, with end stack.

Rear elevation: projecting wing on left shows reverse-stepped gable and renewed windows in old openings with timber lintels on inner return.

Interior. Ground floor north room has chamfered stone fireplace with strainer beam above, and blocked doorway with Tudor-arched head within chamfered square frame. Roof of both wings has principal rafter trusses with collars, and carpenter's numbering.

Listing NGR: NU2468805890


Image hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.com/Warkworth
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 30th, 2017, 03:39 PM   #1842
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

A once 'holy' location in the heart of Tyneside - but see how it's changed over the last 100 years

From Dave Morton in today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...eside-13400379
A once 'holy' location in the heart of Tyneside - but see how it's changed over the last 100 years
David Morton 30 July 2017

The sad state of Bede's Well, 2017 (Image: Newcastle Chronicle)


Bede's Well, c1900 (Norman Dunn) (Image: Norman Dunn)

It’s perhaps hard to believe this peaceful, rustic scene once sat in the heart of industrial Tyneside.

This was Bede’s Well, a stone’s throw from the ancient village of Monkton in Jarrow, in around 1910. Only a mile away from here was smoke, noise and grime, and the heavy industries of the River Tyne which were in full swing. People would escape to this small patch of rolling countryside but, in the decades after this charming photograph was taken, the area would fall victim to industrialisation.

Slag and waste from Palmer’s shipyard and iron works in Jarrow was dumped here, turning the land into a virtual moonscape. Up until the 1980s, the area was known locally as “the slaggy”. Since then, it’s been reclaimed as rolling grassland criss-crossed with tree-lined paths.

Today, the stream - which appears on a 1912 map as Bede’s Burn - is long gone. And all that remains of Bede’s Well sits in a small hollow untended and filled with rubbish. Legend has it the former watering hole was visited by the venerable Saint Bede and the monks from Jarrow Monastery, which sits about two miles away. Scorn is sometimes poured on this suggestion, but why would Bede and his monks not wander the ancient paths of Jarrow – after all they walked to Rome? And why would they not know about a fresh water spring on their patch? It is claimed they would not need to use this area for fresh water as their monastery had a well and fresh water from the River Don. But there is also the suggestion that a young Bede may have preached at the well, which today sits on the border of Jarrow and Hebburn.

A spokesman for South Tyneside Council said: “Bedeswell Park and Campbell Park, where Bede’s Well is located, was created in the 1990s. It had formerly been a dumping ground for waste from the smelting of iron ore for Palmer’s Shipyard - creating a vast slag heap. Whilst we appreciate that the well may not have been brought back to how it appeared in 1932, the works that took place in the 1990s did go some way to improving the wider area. The council had previously investigated the erection of a plaque to mark the well although were unable to secure funding to take this forward. The well is, however, promoted via the council’s website. We are not aware of any specific community group or organisation who has recently requested further improvement works to be carried out to the well and whilst operating in an extremely tight financial envelope we would be unable to allocate funds to it at this time.

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...eside-13400379
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old July 31st, 2017, 04:57 PM   #1843
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

Green Batt House, Alnwick

This is the Grade II Listed Green Batt House, Alnwick, photographed 3rd May 2017.

Listing text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ https://www.britishlistedbuildings.c...k#.WX8bRumQxtQ

Entry Name: Green Batt House
Listing Date: 25 August 1977
Grade: II
Source: Historic England
Source ID: 1041478
English Heritage Legacy ID: 235729
Location: Alnwick, Northumberland, NE66
County: Northumberland
Parish: Alnwick

GREEN BATT (South Side) Green Batt House
5330
NU 1813 SE 1/55

Early C19 (after 1827) detached villa.

Two storeys, 2 windows to garden (south) front, 3 to east and one to north (entrance) front. Ashlar with moulded eaves cornice. Hipped slate roof with one chimney to north and one to south. Glazing bar sash windows. Two storey one window lean-to to left on south side. Heavy parapetted porch right of centre on north side. Two storey 2 window stable block with string course over ground floor and 1st floor cill course. Built of ashlar on north-west corner of house, also with hipped slate roof; it has a segmental coach arch to right, 2 piers and 3 corbels in left hand recess. Further lean-to outbuilding to north.

Listing NGR: NU1876613063

The Gate Piers are covered by a separate listing as:

Entry Name: Garden Wall on North and East Sides of Green Batt House and Gate Piers
Listing Date: 25 August 1977
Grade: II
Source: Historic England
Source ID: 1302646
English Heritage Legacy ID: 235730
Location: Alnwick, Northumberland, NE66
County: Northumberland
Parish: Alnwick

GREEN BATT (South Side) Garden wall on north and east sides of Green Batt House and gate-piers
5330
NU 1813 SE 1/55A

Early-mid C19.

North wall about 7 ft high and 28 yds long ashlar, returned to west and pierced by octagonal gate-piers about 8ft high with pointed capping and antefixae end by side door to left. East wall: coursed rabble about 6-7 ft high and about 95 yds long south end capped by about 3 ft of brick work.

Listing NGR: NU1877913103






Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.c...20Batt%20House
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 1st, 2017, 04:45 PM   #1844
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

Bridge House Pine Tree House and Bridge Way, Rothbury

These photographs cover two Grade II Listed Buildings, Bridge Way is to the left and Bridge House Pine Tree House to the right.

Photographed 17th July 2017.

Listing text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ https://www.britishlistedbuildings.c...y#.WYCMaumQxtR

Entry Name: Bridge House Pine Tree House
Listing Date: 25 August 1987
Grade: II
Source: Historic England
Source ID: 1371118
English Heritage Legacy ID: 236610
Location: Rothbury, Northumberland, NE65
County: Northumberland
Parish: Rothbury

ROTHBURY BRIDGE STREET (East side) Bridge House and Pine Tree House
NU 0501
25/265

House, now divided into two dwellings. c.1790, extended to rear soon after; mid-C19 kitchen wing. Subdivided 1935.

Squared tooled stone; Welsh slate roof with one old brick stack. West elevation (front of Bridge House) 2 storeys, 2 bays: central part-glazed 5-panel door in wooden doorcase with fluted pilasters and cornice; renewed 12-pane sash windows. Roof hipped to right; old brick stack on left built against taller gable end of adjacent house. 2-bay right return shows 12-pane sashes to right, and C20 12-pane casement under renewed 12-pane sash on left; stepped-and-banded ridge stack. Rear elevation (now front of Pinetree House) shows arched stair window and 12-pane sashes to left; the lower, with boarded panel below sill, was formerly a French window. To right is projecting gabled kitchen wing, with renewed 12-pane sashes on 1-bay inner return.

Interior: 6-panel doors throughout. Pinetree House has drawing room with fireplace in stepped stone surround under moulded stone mantelpiece, flanked by segmental-arched recesses; floral scroll cornice. Straight stair with stick balusters and ramped moulded handrail; stairhead has egg-and dart cornice.

The house is said to have been built for the Ogle family's stewards.

Listing NGR: NU0590501648

Entry Name: Bridge Way
Listing Date: 25 August 1987
Grade: II
Source: Historic England
Source ID: 1041933
English Heritage Legacy ID: 236609
Location: Rothbury, Northumberland, NE65
County: Northumberland
Parish: Rothbury

ROTHBURY BRIDGE STREET (East side) Bridge Way
(Nos. 1, 2 and 3)
NU 0501
25/264

House, now 3 flats. Late C17 or early C18, heightened in early C19; converted to flats c.1978.

Lower part heavy rubble with roughly-shaped quoins, top floor smaller rubble with tooled quoins; tooled lintels and sills; Welsh slate roof. 3 storeys, 3 bays. Inserted 6-panel door with plain overlight on far right, with small windows on right and above. Plain sash windows, that on ground floor centre in former door opening. Several blocked openings include upper door on far left. Coped gables with stepped-and-banded left end stack and truncated right end stack.

Flat-roofed pebbledashed rear extension is not of interest.

Listing NGR: NU0589801658






Images hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...57683657841992
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 1st, 2017, 10:36 PM   #1845
alf stone
Registered User
 
alf stone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 1,980
Likes (Received): 338

Spink Pharmacy 181 Coatsworth Road Gateshead

I have mentioned on the Coatsworth Road thread that I have become involved with the 22 Sheds Coatsworth Road Project and last week they showed me this photograph which I had never seen before:

Spink Pharmacy 181 Coatsworth Road by alfred stone, on Flickr

I was aware of the shop and it first appeared in the 1902 Kelly's Directory at 9 Sedgewick Place. By the last entry I found in 1929 it was listed as 181 Coatsworth Road which is the corner of Coatsworth Road and Bewick Road. At some stage Sedgewick Place was shortened and now only runs from 1 to 4. This is what it looks like now:

DSCF1290 Lloyds Pharmacy 181 Coatsworth Road by alfred stone, on Flickr

In the meantime it had been Gateshead Co-op Drug Store, North Durham Co-op pharmacy, Gardner and Weddell chemist and Clearance Centre a part of Hills Pharmacy.

The project leader couldn't tell me the source of the Spink photograph but has promised to find out. I had assumed it was from Gateshead Libraries website but I couldn't find it on there.
alf stone está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2017, 12:44 PM   #1846
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

When Tynemouth Outdoor Pool was in full swing 45 years ago - but what does its future hold?

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...swing-13418818
When Tynemouth Outdoor Pool was in full swing 45 years ago - but what does its future hold?
David Morton 2 August 2017


Youngsters at Tynemouth Outdoor Pool, August 1972

We step back in time to the summer of 1972. In the August of that year, the youngsters in our picture would have been in the midst of their school holidays.

The location is Tynemouth Outdoor Pool which was still in full swing 45 years ago, but would close two decades later. The pool’s story began in the inter-war years. During the 1920s and 30s, as the people of Britain enjoyed greater leisure time, more than 200 lidos and pools were built across the country. One of these was Tynemouth Outdoor Pool at Sharpness Point, which opened in the sweltering summer of 1925.

It’s interesting that even though the local paper reported the opening took place in warm summer weather, the hundreds of folk watching the proceedings were in full daily dress. (No bikinis or swimming trunks, back then!) There had been calls to build a pool here since around 1905 after several people drowned swimming in the unpredictable North Sea. Once built, the pool was automatically filled by the incoming tide and was, for decades, a popular venue for local families and holidaymakers.

It would host regular swimming galas and competitions, and was a magnet for thousands. Terraces were designed to hold up to 2,000 people, while visitors could hire tents to use as changing rooms - and retain their modesty.

Sadly, with the rise of foreign holidays, the opening of the nearby indoor pool, fewer outdoor bathers, and the mounting cost of cleaning and repairs, the open-air pool was finally closed in the mid-90s. In 1996 the council made a botched effort to revamp the pool with the intention of converting it to a ‘rock pool’ by scattering it with large stones and boulders.

Read more and see video @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...swing-13418818
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 3rd, 2017, 03:01 PM   #1847
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

A dark Tyneside chapter that came to its brutal conclusion 185 years ago today

Dave Morton writing in today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...rutal-13426451
A dark Tyneside chapter that came to its brutal conclusion 185 years ago today
David Morton 3rd August 2017


William Jobling, from Jarrow, was the last man to be gibbeted in England in August, 1832 (Image: Newcastle Chronicle)

It was one of Tyneside’s darkest and most gruesome chapters - and it came to its brutal conclusion on this day 185 years ago.

The story began two months earlier on June 1, 1832, when two Jarrow men, William Jobling and Ralph Armstrong were walking home from South Shields where they’d been drinking. The pair were miners, and on strike against an unfair bonding system which tied them to pits for one year and a day. During their walk home, Jobling and Armstrong came across 71-year-old South Shields magistrate Nicholas Fairles and begged him for money. When the old man refused, he was viciously beaten with a stick and stones. (Fairles would soon die of his injuries, but not before indicating Armstrong, not Jobling, had been the principal attacker). The two men fled. Armstrong was never seen again, while Jobling was quickly captured on the beach at South Shields.

At his trial in Durham , Jobling was quickly found guilty and publicly hanged on August 3 in front of an eager crowd. To compound the agony and humiliation for his family, Jobling was tarred with pitch and placed in a gibbet. A gibbet was a frame, often made of metal, built to contain the body of a criminal and hung from a gallows for all to see as the body slowly decomposed.

In the bleak surrounds of Jarrow Slake - or Jarra Slacks as locals still call it - Jobling’s caged body swayed in the wind until it was spirited away in the middle of the night a few weeks later and never seen again. It was rumoured his body was buried by family and friends at a spot near the Jarrow entrance of the modern-day Tyne pedestrian tunnel. There is a memorial there today.

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...rutal-13426451


John Sykes wrote about the events in his Local Records as:

August 1st 1832

William Jobling was tried at the assizes at Durham, and found guilty of the murder of Nicholas Fairles, esq..

He was sentenced to be hanged on Friday, August 3rd, and his body to be afterwards hung in chains near the scene of the murder.

Soon after twelve o'clock Jobling suffered the extreme penalty of the law, on the drop erected in front of the county courts at Durham. After his condemnation he was very attentive to his religious duties, and he exhibited on his way to and upon the scaffold the utmost resignation and fortitude.

He acknowledged, while in prison, the justice of his sentence, though he denied having been the principal in the fatal transaction which led to his ignominious death. He earnestly entreated a reverend gentlemen, who attended him, to express to Mrs. Fairles and her family his sorrow for what had taken place, and to assure her and them that when he met Mr. Fairles, which was accidental, he had no intention to harm him. He hoped they would forgive him, as he sincerely forgave all mankind who had at any time done him any injury.

His step was firm as be entered upon the scaffold, but the power of articulation failed him, and he was in consequence unable to address the spectators, as he had stated it to be his intention to do. He could neither read nor write, but had procured a friend to transcribe some scraps from books which had been read to him in the gaol, which he wished to scatter among the crowd. He was dissuaded from doing this, and he gave them to the governor of the prison to deliver to a person whom he named.

Just as the fatal bolt was about to be withdrawn, a person near the scaffold cried out "Farewell, Jobling," and he instantly turned his head in the direction whence the voice proceeded, which displaced the cord, and consequently protracted his sufferings, which continued for some minutes.

After hanging an hour, the body was cut down and conveyed into the gaol, where it remained until the gibbet was ready.

It was a very wet day, consequently the crowd was not so numerous as was anticipated. Fifty of the 8th hussars mounted, and fifty of the 15th regiment of foot, were drawn up in front of the drop, where they remained until the body was cut down. A portion of these regiments had marched from Newcastle to Durham for the purpose, and also to escort the body to Jarrow Slake.

After the body was conveyed into the gaol, the clothes were taken off but no incision made, it was then covered over with pitch, and the clothes in which he was hanged were replaced.

On Monday morning, August the 6th, at seven o'clock, the body was taken in a small four-wheeled waggon, drawn by two horses, from Durham, escorted by a troop of hussars, and two companies of infantry, T. Griffith, esq., the under-sheriff, Mr. Frushard, the gaoler, officers of the gaol, bailiffs, &c, &c. They proceeded by way of Chester-le-Street, Picktree, Sludge-row, Porto Bello, over the Black Fell, to White Mare Pool, and thence by the South Shields turnpike road, to Jarrow Slake, where they arrived at half-past one o'clock.

The spectators were not numerous, perhaps about 1,000, and not many pitmen amongst them, on account it was supposed, of a meeting being held by them that day on Boldon Fell. On the arrival of the cavalcade at Jarrow Slake it was joined by Bryan Abbs and William Loraine, esqrs, magistrates of the county; the military were then drawn up, and formed two sides of a square, the cavalry on the right, and the infantry on the left.

The body was then lifted from the waggon. It was cased in flat bars of iron of 2½ inches in breadth, the feet were placed in stirrups, from which a bar of iron went up each side of the head, and ended in a ring, by which he warn suspended; a bar from the collar went down the breast, and another down the back; there were also bars in the inside of the legs, which communicated with the above; and cross bars at the ankles, the knees, the thighs, the bowels, the breast, and shoulders; the hands were hung by the sides, and covered with pitch; the face was pitched and covered with a piece of white cloth.

Being laid on a hand barrow, the body was conveyed to the gibbet, which was fixed nearly opposite the spot where the murder was committed, and about 100 yards within the Slake from high water mark. The gibbet, which was fixed in a stone 1½ ton weight, sunk in the Slake, was formed of a square piece of timber (fir) twenty-one feet long, and a top projecting about three feet, with strong bars of iron up each side to prevent its being sawn down.

At high water the tide covered the gibbet about four or five feet, leaving sixteen or seventeen feet visible. The body being hoisted up and secured, a police guard was placed near the spot, and remained there for some time.

Jobling was the first person gibbeted under the new act of parliament, ordering the bodies of murderers to be hung in chains. The body, when gibbetted, had on the clothes in which the criminal appeared upon his trial:— blue jacket and trousers, the heel-quarters of his shoes were down, and through a large hole in one of his stockings the naked heel was visible; his head was thrown quite back, so that his face appeared as if looking upwards.

During the very dark night between the 31st of August and the let of September Jobling's body was stolen from the gibbet and secretly disposed of by some persons unknown.
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 4th, 2017, 04:13 PM   #1848
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

Minchella, Mark Toney and over a century of ice cream in the North East

Courtesy of today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ntury-13428101
Minchella, Mark Toney and over a century of ice cream in the North East
David Morton 4 Auhust 2017


Risi's ice cream pitch in Newcastle's Bigg Market in the 1920s

The Chronicle reported the sad news earlier this week that ice cream boss, Trevor Minchella, had passed away after a battle with illness.

Trevor, 65, had been a popular figure at his ice cream parlour on Seaburn Promenade for decades. We told how he died peacefully surrounded by family at their home in Cleadon on July 26, a day after watching his daughter Claudia graduate from University of the Arts London.

And his sons Michael and Mario opened up about the loss of their father. Mario said: “I don’t think you could have asked for a better father. He supported us in everything we did, and never tried to force us to do anything.” The name Minchella, has enjoyed a long presence in South Tyneside, and is well-known in the world of North East ice cream. It’s no surprise that Italian names dominate the early story of ice cream in the North - and some remain popular today.

Meanwhile, Scappaticci, Risi, Pellegrino and Pantrini may sound like the midfield line-up for Inter Milan, but the history of these names reflects the story of ice cream in the North East. Perhaps Newcastle’s Mark Toney brand is the most famous.

It was back in the summer of 1902 that Antonio Marcantonio, later to be known as Mark Toney, came to Tyneside from Picinisco, a small mountain village near Rome, with his young wife Angela and their baby. They began making ice cream and set up shop in Newcastle’s Grainger Market. More than a century and four generation later, Mark Toney and its restaurants remain an iconic Geordie brand.

Read more and see video @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ntury-13428101
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 6th, 2017, 11:29 AM   #1849
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

Burn House, 5 Castle Street, Warkworth

Another of Warkworth's Grade II Listed Buildings, this one at 5 Castle Street, dating from 1818.

Pevsner refers to the building as the best early 19th century house on the street.

Listing text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ https://www.britishlistedbuildings.c...h#.WYbcYOmQxtQ

Entry Name: 5, Castle Street
Listing Date: 1 September 1988
Grade: II
Source: Historic England
Source ID: 1371229
English Heritage Legacy ID: 237167
Location: Warkworth, Northumberland, NE65
County: Northumberland
Civil Parish: Warkworth

WARKWORTH CASTLE STREET (West side) No. 5
NU 2405
22/276

House, 1818 for James Grieve Burn.

Squared stone, that on front of near- ashlar quality; Welsh slate roof. 2 storeys, 4 bays. Plinth and 1st-floor band. Right end 4 steps up to door of 6 beaded panels, under patterned fanlight, in surround with columns and open pedimented hood. Left end 3-centred carriage arch holding boarded double gates with swept spiked top rail. 12-pane sash windows with slightly projecting sills. Moulded eaves cornice below balustrade with panelled end piers and moulded handrail. End stacks.

Interior: Doors and shutters with beaded mouldings. Sitting Room has dado rail and moulded cornice. Dog-leg stair with stick balusters, moulded newels and moulded ramped handrail. Cellar has stone-vaulted part with brick wine bins.

Early C20 rear wing linking to coach-house (q.v.) is not of special interest.

Listing NGR: NU2469105905

Photographed 10th May 2017:




Images hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...57684587894114
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk

Last edited by Steve Ellwood; August 6th, 2017 at 11:42 AM. Reason: Typo
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 7th, 2017, 02:00 PM   #1850
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

Rothbury Bridge

Crossing the River Coquet, this is the Grade II Listed Rothbury Bridge, photographed 17th July 2017.

Also a Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM).

Listing text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ https://www.britishlistedbuildings.c...y#.WYhL6emQxtQ

Entry Name: Rothbury Bridge
Listing Date: 21 October 1953
Grade: II
Source: Historic England
Source ID: 1041932
English Heritage Legacy ID: 236608
Location: Rothbury, Northumberland, NE65
County: Northumberland
Civil Parish: Rothbury

ROTHBURY BRIDGE STREET Rothbury Bridge
NU 0501
25/263
21.10.53

Bridge. Medieval; south arch rebuilt C16 or C17; widened to east 1759; new superstructure mid-C20.

Squared stone. 4 segmental, almost semicircular arches which are double chamfered to the west and have arch rings to the east. The 3 northern arches each have 4 chamfered soffit ribs; plain soffits to southern arch and 1759 widening, Pointed cutwaters, those on west with canted tops. Flat coped C19 approach walls on north.

The date 1759 and initials W.O. (William Oliphant, a Rothbury mason) are said to be carved low on the east face.

C20 concrete and steel superstructure, extending over cutwaters and replacing original parapets, is not of interest.

Listing NGR: NU0589501598

This from the Northumberland Gazette @ http://www.northumberlandgazette.co....ward-1-6564854
Rothbury bridge project wins national award
Helen Millichamp 16 April 2014

Northumberland County Council has won a prestigious award for its work on restrengthening Rothbury bridge. The county is one of this year’s winners in the Historic Bridge and Infrastructure Awards (HBIA) which ‘recognise and encourage excellence and innovation in conservation.’

The awarding judges commented that ‘Traditional techniques and an innovative use of modern materials have been skilfully combined to complement and enhance the character of the old bridge rather than over-shadow it’. Northumberland County Council invested £3.7million in the bridge works and a team including engineers and stone masons carried out a highly complex series of works to strengthen the bridge which was built in 1460.

The bridge across the River Coquet is within the heart of the community in Rothbury, and closing the bridge for any length of time was not feasible. Engineers met the challenge by building a temporary Bailey bridge to carry traffic across the river while the work on the original bridge was completed. The work on the bridge was also subject to several constraints as the structure is a Scheduled Ancient Monument and spans a river which is a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest, with protected species of bats and birds.

Following consultation with local people, the council’s stonemasons joined with local stonemasons to construct features last seen more than 100 years ago, such as parapets and refuges. Six Victorian lamp posts were added to restore the bridge to its former glory.

The restored bridge was opened by her Grace the Duchess of Northumberland in December 2012. The HBIA awards are open to projects which must involve the structural maintenance, strengthening, and restoration or conservation of a structure more than 30 years old. It must be within England, Wales or Scotland and must have been completed within two years of the closing date for nominations.

Read more at: http://www.northumberlandgazette.co....ward-1-6564854




















Images hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...57684618325221
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 10th, 2017, 04:56 PM   #1851
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

8, Bondgate Within, Alnwck

This Grade II Listed Building stands close to the Bondgate Tower, photographed 3rd May 2017.

Listing text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ https://www.britishlistedbuildings.c...k#.WYxh1umQxtQ

Entry Name: 8, Bondgate Within
Listing Date: 25 August 1977
Grade: II
Source: Historic England
Source ID: 1041514
English Heritage Legacy ID: 235622
Location: Alnwick, Northumberland, NE66
County: Northumberland
Civil Parish: Alnwick

BONDGATE WITHIN (North Side) No 8
5330
NU 1813 SE 1/21

Late C18.

Three storeys, 3 windows. Ashlar, cill bands and band courses over ground floor and 1st floor. Simple eaves cornice to slate roof. Coped gables with kneelers. Two gable end chimneys. Late glazed sash windows ( one casement on and floor to right, and one blind window on ground and 1st floors to right). Depressed arch on ground floor to right for through-passage. Newcastle Fire Insurance Mark No 3286.

Four storey, 3 window annexe to rear to west of catslide roof with a further 2 storey, 3 window extension. Ashlar. Glazing bar sash windows.

Listing NGR: NU1885113255




Images hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...57684805217994
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 11th, 2017, 12:04 PM   #1852
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

21 Bridge Street, Warkworth

This Late C18 or early C19 on Bridge Street, Warkworth is Grade II Listed and was photographed 10th May 2017.

Listing text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ https://www.britishlistedbuildings.c...h#.WY17k-mQxtQ

Entry Name: 21, Bridge Street
Listing Date: 1 September 1988
Grade: II
Source: Historic England
Source ID: 1041736
English Heritage Legacy ID: 237144
Location: Warkworth, Northumberland, NE65
County: Northumberland
Civil Parish: Warkworth

WARKWORTH BRIDGE STREET No. 21 (West side)
NU 2406
21/253

House. Late C18 or early C19.

Squared tooled stone; Welsh slate roof with brick stacks. 2 storeys, 3 narrow bays. Centre 6-panel door with 4-pane overlight; 12-pane sash windows except for plain sash ground floor right and trompe l'oeil 1st floor centre; slightly-projecting sills. Eaves bands. Coped right gable on footstone; tall C20 left end stack, small right end stack.

Included for group value.

Listing NGR: NU2471906096


Image hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...57687462596615
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2017, 11:17 AM   #1853
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

Wallington Hall wasn't always cosy, as visitors to the property are learning from an artwork

From the Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/whats...-cosy-13461658
Wallington Hall wasn't always cosy, as visitors to the property are learning from an artwork
By David Whetstone 11 August 2017


Wallington Hall (Image: UGC TNE)

Moving into any new home can be a big job but imagine if that home is Wallington Hall.

In September 1928, after he inherited the Northumberland mansion, Sir Charles Philips Trevelyan moved in with wife Lady Molly and their six children, aged eight to 22. The house had been left in a bad state by Sir Charles’s father so there was work to be done.

Northumberland theatre company November Club has collaborated with the National Trust to recall that time with Moving In, the story of how Lady Molly – for she was the driving domestic force – turned a house into a home. Rather than a theatre performance it’s a series of installations around the house featuring various special objects in suitcases and trunks. Find them, open them and you’ll hear a recording.

Cinzia Hardy, artistic director of November Club, said: “Much has happened since 1928, especially since the National Trust took over the house and moved everything about.The house will have felt, sounded and smelt a lot different. The light would have poured in since Lady Molly pulled down the curtains. The children, even the older ones, loved noise, boisterous games and conversation. We’re inviting people to come in and imagine what it would have been like for the Trevelyan family and get a real sense of who they were and what the house was like.”

There are clues in Lady Molly’s diaries about what the Trevelyans were like. One entry reads: “I always had a feeling that the old house was awaiting a time of re-awakening after many years of somnolence. It was a great delight to us both to feel the life coming back to the old house with the ring of children’s voices, and the scamper of feet down the long passages.”

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/whats...-cosy-13461658
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 13th, 2017, 06:19 PM   #1854
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

Frozen in time – ice house at country hotel restored

Courtesy of the Morpeth Herald @ http://www.morpethherald.co.uk/news/...ored-1-8696211
Frozen in time – ice house at country hotel restored
13 August 2017


The Ice House, at Matfen Hall Hotel.

A rare, 250-year-old building in the grounds of a Northumberland country-house hotel has come in from the cold, following a major restoration.

The Ice House, at Matfen Hall Hotel, was built in 1774 by owner Sir Edward Blackett to enable his guests to enjoy fashionable ice creams in summer. Built into a north facing slope, its thick stone walls ensured that slabs of ice, taken from the surface of the nearby lake in winter or imported from the Baltic, remained frozen for many months at a time. But following the invention of domestic fridges in the early 1900s, it fell into disuse.

Now, with help from a grant from the Country Houses Foundation, the Ice House has been fully restored and can be visited by guests looking to explore the grounds of the hotel.

“Ice houses were increasingly fashionable on country estates in the 1700s, as a great deal of preserving ice was needed to keep ice creams cool enough until dinner time,” said Matfen Hall Hotel’s owner and Sir Edward’s descendant, Sir Hugh Blackett. “It was largely in the summer months that gentry households resided in the country, which made it all the more impressive if guests could be entertained with cold ices on the hottest days. Sadly, after a century of disuse, the Ice House was in a sorry state of repair and the dome was in danger of collapse, so we are delighted to have been able to restore it to its former condition.”

Read more at: http://www.morpethherald.co.uk/news/...ored-1-8696211
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 14th, 2017, 02:28 PM   #1855
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

Linnels Bridge, also known as Linnolds Bridge, Corbridge

This is the Grade II Listed Linnels Bridge or Linnolds Bridge which crosses Devil's Water on the B6306, Edmundbyers to Hexham road.

The Archaeology Data Service @ http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/ makes this observation:

Quote:
The inscribed tablet probably relates to the construction of the first bridge on the site, replacing Lynel Ford mentioned in the Order of the Watch for Bywell in 1522.

In 1684 Cuthbert Nicholson and seven others were fined for 'suffering Lynell Bridge to be out of repaire'. The present bridge is reputed to date from 1698; the parapets have clearly been rebuilt, perhaps c.1900, and there has been recent repair to the base of the west abutment.

The bridge is of some historical value in retaining an inscribed tablet which presumably dates its original construction and names its builder.

The bridge is quite plain and functional, of the same character as other late 17th century bridges in the area.

The inscribed tablet in its rather vernacular version of a Classical frame is of interest, although badly decayed (and decaying); there might be a case for removing the original to a place of safe keeping and replacing it with a (legible) replica.

The abutments may incorporate masonry of the original 1581 structure (several phases of stonework appear to be visible on the east side, although difficult to interpret in detail); any archaeological fill will almost certainly have been removed when the bridge was 'saddled' (possibly twice), and the form of the bridge at roadway level has been considerably modified in the interests of motor traffic.
This is the listing text courtesy of The British Listed Buildings web site @ https://www.britishlistedbuildings.c...e#.WZFr1emQxtQ

Entry Name: Linnels Bridge
Listing Date: 18 June 1986
Grade: II
Source: Historic England
Source ID: 1303209
English Heritage Legacy ID: 240580
Location: Corbridge, Northumberland, NE46
County: Northumberland
Civil Parish: Corbridge

HEXHAMSHIRE LOW QUARTER B 6306 Linnels - Linnels Bridge
NY 96 SE
3/210

Bridge, probably 1698 incorporating inscribed tablet from predecessor of
1581.

Squared stone. Segmental arch with recessed voussoirs, splayed abutments. Parapets with chamfered coping; flat-coped C20 approach walls. Raised tablet (same design on each face, better preserved on north) on centre of northern parapet has flanking pilasters, entablature with beaded moulding and round-arched pediment; inscription in raised lettering now largely illegible:

GOD PRESARVE WMFOIRA ERENGTON,
BELLDETE THIS BREGE OF LYME AND STONE
1581


Listing NGR: NY9550261660

Photographs taken 13th August 2017.














Images hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...57684100589882
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2017, 09:47 AM   #1856
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

Ex Station Passenger Building Mariners Point Oxford Street Tynemouth

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
This is the Grade II Listed former Refreshment Rooms and Railway Hotel of Tynemouth Railway Station, North Tyneside – situated in Oxford Street, Tynemouth. Photographed 10th June 2013.

Description: Former Refreshment Rooms and Railway Hotel of Tynemouth Railway Station
Grade: II
Date Listed: 19 February 1986
English Heritage Building ID: 303352

OS Grid Reference: NZ3675769131
OS Grid Coordinates: 436757, 569131
Latitude/Longitude: 55.0154, -1.4267

Location: Oxford Street, North Tyneside NE30 4DX

Locality: North Tyneside
County: North Tyneside
Country: England
Postcode: NE30 4DX

TYNEMOUTH OXFORD STREET (west side, off)
NZ 3669 SE
Tynemouth
9/106 Former refreshment rooms and railway hotel of Tynemouth Old Railway Station.
G.V. II

Railway hotel and refreshment rooms. Circa 1847; possibly by J and B Green, for Newcastle and Berwick Railway Company.

Sandstone ashlar with rusticated quoins; Welsh slate roof with some brick repairs to ashlar chimneys.

Near-symmetrical composition of 3-storey, 3-bay block and 2-storey, 3- and 4-bay wings.

South elevation to vehicle way: main block has central double door in raised stone surround, flat stone lintels and slightly projecting sills to sash windows, paired at right and above door; oriel window at ground floor left; wings in similar style. 2 ridge chimneys on hipped roof of central block.
Tall chimneys on roll-moulded plinths, at front of wings.

Stencilled REFRESHMENT visible on lintel of entrance from platform at rear.

An early example of a purpose-built railway hotel.

Listing NGR: NZ3675769131
(Source: British Listed Buildings @ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co...nd-railway-hot)




















Images hosted on http://ellwood.fototime.com/Tynemout...%20Oxford%20St
17/00936/LBC | Repointing in isolated areas. Reinstating ball finials. Repointing copings, string courses, ashlar surrounds. Replacement of mortar fillets to windows. Isolated stone indenting. Isolated stone motar repairs. Replacement of felt lining to parapet gutter of single storey offshoot. Re-support of timber purlins in single storey offshoot roof. Isolated slate replacement. Chimney flaunching repairs | Ex Station Passenger Building Mariners Point Oxford Street Tynemouth Tyne And Wear
Reference 17/00936/LBC
Alternative Reference PP-06168077
Application Received Thu 22 Jun 2017
Application Validated Thu 22 Jun 2017
Address Ex Station Passenger Building Mariners Point Oxford Street Tynemouth Tyne And Wear
Proposal Repointing in isolated areas. Reinstating ball finials. Repointing copings, string courses, ashlar surrounds. Replacement of mortar fillets to windows. Isolated stone indenting. Isolated stone motar repairs. Replacement of felt lining to parapet gutter of single storey offshoot. Re-support of timber purlins in single storey offshoot roof. Isolated slate replacement. Chimney flaunching repairs
Status Decided
Decision Application Permitted
Decision Issued Date Thu 17 Aug 2017
https://idoxpublicaccess.northtynesi...=OS5IRRBH0GZ00
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2017, 11:36 AM   #1857
sieldfield
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 3
Likes (Received): 1

tynemouth station oxford street

I fear the listing people have got that badly wrong , that is the station building with associated offices etc. The Royal Hotel was built in 1850 on the south side of the platform and demolished in c1985 . source :North Eastern Railway Association
As a tynemouth lad I knew the sight well , the refreshment room stencil was on the lintel of a blocked up doorway on the platform and was still clearly visible just before demolition .
Perhaps it was re-used when the station building was converted to housing .
__________________

Andym liked this post
sieldfield no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2017, 02:22 PM   #1858
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

On This Day In History - 18th August 1750

John Sykes wrote this in his Local Records for this day in history, 18th August 1750.

A terrible fire broke out at one Bobson's, who kept an ale-house near the church in Bellingham, Northumberland.

It burnt with great fury for some hours, during which time twenty-seven houses were reduced to ashes, the families of which lost most of their effects, some saving only what they had on their backs.

During the conflagration, the barn, byers, &c., of John Reed, esq., narrowly escaped, they having taken fire three times.

The fire was occasioned by Robson having put some straw into a large chest in which they used to keep their oatmeal, (it being customary before they put down their new meal, to set fire to a wisp of straw, in order to make it sweet, destroy the mites, &c.,) and, being in liquor, lighted it, shut the lid, and came down stairs, Some time after, his wife and he went to bed, not remembering what he bad done ; they awoke about twelve o'clock almost stifled with smoke, and he then, but too late, bethought himself of the chest.

He endeavoured to go up stairs to fetch down some cash which he recollected they had in the house, but in the attempt the floor fell in with him, and he perished in the flames. His wife escaped in her shift.

William Charlton, of Redesmouth, esq., had twelve houses consumed, notwithstanding which, he generously distributed handsome sums among the unhappy sufferers, and ordered that they should be provided with necessaries.
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2017, 09:59 PM   #1859
GBDT
Registered User
 
GBDT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,230
Likes (Received): 311

Quote:
Originally Posted by sieldfield View Post
I fear the listing people have got that badly wrong , that is the station building with associated offices etc. The Royal Hotel was built in 1850 on the south side of the platform and demolished in c1985 . source :North Eastern Railway Association
As a tynemouth lad I knew the sight well , the refreshment room stencil was on the lintel of a blocked up doorway on the platform and was still clearly visible just before demolition .
Perhaps it was re-used when the station building was converted to housing .
The Listed Building text that Steve's link connects to calls it "Main Passenger Building of Tynemouth Old Railway Station". There is no mention of a hotel in the text that is shown on that page. Wonder if has been changed?

Cheers
GBDT
GBDT está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 19th, 2017, 05:24 PM   #1860
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,633
Likes (Received): 3794

Ex Station Passenger Building Mariners Point Oxford Street Tynemouth

Quote:
Originally Posted by sieldfield View Post
I fear the listing people have got that badly wrong , that is the station building with associated offices etc. The Royal Hotel was built in 1850 on the south side of the platform and demolished in c1985 . source :North Eastern Railway Association
As a tynemouth lad I knew the sight well , the refreshment room stencil was on the lintel of a blocked up doorway on the platform and was still clearly visible just before demolition .
Perhaps it was re-used when the station building was converted to housing .
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBDT View Post
The Listed Building text that Steve's link connects to calls it "Main Passenger Building of Tynemouth Old Railway Station". There is no mention of a hotel in the text that is shown on that page. Wonder if has been changed?

Cheers
GBDT
Indeed G, the listing has been re-written since my original posting and is now:

Courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ https://www.britishlistedbuildings.c...d#.WZhW3OmQxtQ

Entry Name: Main Passenger Building of Tynemouth Old Railway Station
Listing Date: 9 July 1979
Grade: II
Source: Historic England
Source ID: 1299917
English Heritage Legacy ID: 303351
Location: North Tyneside, NE30
County: North Tyneside
Locality: Tynemouth

TYNEMOUTH OXFORD STREET (west side) Nos. 5 and 6 (Main passenger
building of Tynemouth old Railway Station)
NZ 3669 SE
9/105
9.7.79

Railway station passenger building. 1846-7 by John and Benjamin Green and R. Nicholson for the Newcastle and Berwick Railway Company.

Sandstone ashlar; Welsh slate roof with stone gable copings. Tudor style. 2 storeys, 3 wide bays: and right wing of one storey, 3 bays. Projecting gabled centre bay has buttressed portico to 3-light window flanked by half-glazed double doors.

Carved arms of Newcastle in spandrels of portico. Oriel window in gable peak. 3-light ground-floor windows in outer bays under corbelled-out gabled oriel half-dormers. 2-light windows in right wing. All windows stone mullioned and boarded up. Sloped gable copings on curved kneelers; ball finials to principal gables. Ashlar chimneys, that at left truncated; ridge ventilator to wing.

Historical note: Newcastle and North Shields Railway Company of 1835, with terminus in North Shields, amalgamated in 1845 with Newcastle and Berwick Company. Source: H.E. Craster History of Northumberland vol. VIII p. 355. Empty and derelict at time of survey.

Listing NGR: NZ3676669170
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk

GBDT liked this post
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
1 of 2 historic threads, historic newcastle, historic north east eng, history, newcastle, newcastle photos, north east england

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu