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Old January 24th, 2010, 01:25 PM   #21
WilfBurnsFan
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My mind jogged by NH on the 'might have been' thread, I'd recommend 'Ryder and Yates' by Rutter Carol (RIBA Publishing, 2009). It's the story of what was probably the most important NE architectural practice of the twentieth century. In the 1940s Gordon Ryder taught architecture at Kings College Newcastle, and Peter Yates studied under Le Corbusier. Together they joined Berthold Lubetkin's team which produced an astonishingly modernist (but, in the end, unexecuted) plan for the New Town of Peterlee. They then formed their own partnership which over the next thirty-plus years came up with pioneering modernist buildings in the north-east, including housing developments at Fenham, Kenton Bar and Albany (Washington); the Salvation Army Men's Palace and MEA House in Newcastle; and a significant cluster of developments in Killingworth, notably for the gas industry, including Norgas House and the British Gas Engineering Research Station. The book is well illustrated as is written in a fairly accessible style (not too much jargon) and is well worth getting for anyone who is interested in the face of the region in the later twentieth century.
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Old January 26th, 2010, 02:54 AM   #22
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Book of the Week, W/C Monday 26th January 2010 . .



Mine is the 2006 edition, I think it's been updated since.

I don't really need to review this one, as here is a LINK to their website . .

http://www.theburglarsdog.co.uk/
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Old January 26th, 2010, 10:25 PM   #23
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I've just ordered "Byker Revisited" by Sirkka-Liisa-Konttinen. It's the follow-up to the 1980's book that she originally did, as show on previous page by Newcastle Historian.



I'm from Byker, so I am curious in the pictorial stories of other people's lives in the area.

It should be fascinating!

REVIEW . . .

Sirkka-Liisa Konttinen moved to the Byker area of Newcastle in 1970 and shortly after her arrival she began to capture the spirit of the community in evocative photographs that formed the basis of a book and film. Since leaving Byker in 1976, Sirkka has maintained contact with the area and its many residents who have become her friends.

BYKER REVISITED is a visual and verbal documentary, a portrait of a contemporary community that is in flux - a community of the poor, the disadvantaged and the refugees who demonstrate a life-affirming humanity which is captured in their words and Sirkka's stunning photographs. Lee Hall, the writer of the film BILLY ELLIOT and the play THE PITMEN PAINTERS, provides an introduction.

The exhibition and the Amber documentary film of the same name in 2009 will ensure that this small but famous area of Newcastle will attract a world-wide audience, an audience who will instinctively respond to the basic 'goodness' reflected in the words and pictures. Some twenty-eight languages are spoken in the Byker area representing a diverse collection of people who could be described as being on the margins of society but the images and interviews collected in BYKER REVISITED affirm a commonality in the hopes and aspirations of this diverse collection of cultures and religions.

It is a community that is uniquely Byker.


Source - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Byker-Revisi...4540552&sr=1-1

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; February 12th, 2015 at 03:20 PM.
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Old January 28th, 2010, 10:58 PM   #24
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Made in Newcastle : Visual Culture

I thought I should flag this book up too. It's an interesting take on Newcastle's built environment, representation in the media and academic/cultural development. It's published by an academic press and can be a bit dry/academic. But as a collection of essays, it does act as a decent interpretation of the development of people's concept of Newcastle upto the 'noughties'.

http://www.northumbria.ac.uk/sd/cent...ue/hist/dned1/

http://www.nandnsociety.org.uk/City%...nNewcastle.htm
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Old February 1st, 2010, 04:40 PM   #25
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 1st February 2010 . . . something slightly DIFFERENT.

Kelly's Directory of Newcastle upon Tyne . . .

These are very interesting books, that were compiled and published for a very long time throughout much of the last century (and, I think, part of the one before).

You can search for your parents, grandparents, ancestors, friends and relatives, from years gone by.

My copy is from 1959, and my parents aren't listed where I know they were living that year . . don't know why!

There is a residential section by both 'name' and by 'street', and the business/trade section is also very interesting, listing all the businesses of the day.

I think there were Kelly's Directories for a lot of the last century, up until the late 1960s. The best places to find them are in second hand bookshops, or probably online. I'm sure they come up for sale on eBay from time to time . . .






.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; September 1st, 2010 at 02:16 AM.
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Old February 2nd, 2010, 11:02 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deebex View Post
I thought I should flag this book up too. It's an interesting take on Newcastle's built environment, representation in the media and academic/cultural development. It's published by an academic press and can be a bit dry/academic. But as a collection of essays, it does act as a decent interpretation of the development of people's concept of Newcastle upto the 'noughties'.

http://www.northumbria.ac.uk/sd/cent...ue/hist/dned1/

http://www.nandnsociety.org.uk/City%...nNewcastle.htm
Excellent choice Deebex. An EXCELLENT book.

One essay ('Taking Design to Newcastle', by Cheryl Buckley) features the 1969 "Design Centre comes to Newcastle" exhibition in March 1969, and there is a lot of information on the famous Newcastle shop Callers (where the exhibition was held) that I used in the opening post of the Historic Newcastle thread, because of what happened to them later that very same year . .

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=982536

There is a 'wealth' of information in this book, on a lot of the things we cover on many of our different threads on this sub-forum!

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; August 2nd, 2012 at 10:47 PM.
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Old February 8th, 2010, 03:10 AM   #27
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 8th February 2010 . .

Newcastle University, Past, Present and Future
Norman McCord
Third Millenium Publishing Ltd
2006



I feel like I have had a close involvement with this University, since the time when both my parents started to work for them in the 1960s. So I was really pleased when I was told this book was in preparation, and when it came out in 2006, I was not disappointed. It is very comprehensive and full of detailed stories from the University and also some very excellent photos!

Highly recommended, to both current and former students, as well as just to proud Novocastrians whether you have attended there or not!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Newcastle-Un.../dp/1903942470
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Old February 15th, 2010, 06:51 PM   #28
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 15th February 2010 . .

Memories of Tyne Tees Television
Geoff Phillips
G P Electronic Services
1998.



I thought this would be a particularly relevant book to choose this week, in view of all the recent posts and photos on the 'Tyne Tees Studios' project thread, showing the sad demolition along City Road, that started last week.

The book itself is excellent in its coverage of the very early years of Tyne Tees TV, in the 1950s and 1960s. Unfortunately the 1970s and 1980s are not quite so well covered, so the many years of the fabulous TTTV National live music programmmes (Razzamataz, Geordie Scene, Roxy, The Tube, etc) do not receive much coverage. In fact, when this book came out, I assumed it was just 'Volume One', but there has been no sign of 'Volume Two' arriving!

Still, a very good book (lots of photos, stories and actual 'TV listings and schedules') for anyone interested in the details of Newcastle's role in the national ITV Media, in the early years.
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Old February 16th, 2010, 12:34 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
Book of the Week, W/C Monday 26th January 2010 . .



Mine is the 2006 edition, I think it's been updated since.

I don't really need to review this one, as here is a LINK to their website . .

http://www.theburglarsdog.co.uk/
I do love this book. I am big fan of the style of writing in these books. I would describe it as 'intelligent cynicism' and it always makes me laugh. If you like this book I would suggest reading/watching Charlie Brooker in the Guardian and on BBC4 (newswipe).
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Old February 22nd, 2010, 10:47 AM   #30
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The Fenwick Story
Reginald Pound
Lund Humphries
1972.

This is one of my favourite Newcastle books!

I thought it was particularly appropriate to choose this book this week, with the recent 'conclusion' of our Department Stores thread. The book gives a fascinating and complete history of the development of one of Newcastle's (and the UK's) most famous Department Stores, and its other branches. It also contains many photographs of the store, that I have not seen anywhere else.

I came across this book, that I had never seen or heard of before, in a little bookshop in Morpeth in 2000. I was then surprised, when I got it home, to find that this copy had also been signed by four members of the Fenwick family! The best places to find it, if you would like to have a copy, will be (as I did) to look in second hand bookshops, or perhaps on eBay!











.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; October 5th, 2016 at 07:28 PM.
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Old February 22nd, 2010, 01:05 PM   #31
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interesting choice. did you know that the trilby hat was invented by fenwicks?
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Old February 22nd, 2010, 11:09 PM   #32
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Quote:
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interesting choice. did you know that the trilby hat was invented by fenwicks?
What's the story behind that johnny? It's not something that I have ever heard about before!!
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Old February 24th, 2010, 08:13 PM   #33
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What's the story behind that johnny? It's not something that I have ever heard about before!!
i cant remember exactly, but it is something along the lines of a play by the same name (by george du maurier) being staged in London, so Fenwick's, as a publicity stunt, designed a costume for the leading actress to be worn on stage. the novel design for hat proved immensely popular and it went on sale shortly after.
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Old February 28th, 2010, 01:58 PM   #34
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 1st March 2010 . .

Newcastle upon Tyne
Steve Newman & Graeme Peacock
Sanderson Books Ltd, Northumberland
2005.



Now, I know there are LOTS of books (probably 'hundreds') on Photos of Newcastle, which is what the above book is . . but (in my view) N E V E R one as good as this one!!

I look through this book from time to time (and this is the thing that makes it different, to me) and "each and every photo" (of each and every location) is pretty much THE BEST PHOTO of that building or location, that I have ever seen, anywhere!

It is an amazing and excellent collection of photos, with a clear (and 'accurate') explanatory narrative describing the subject matter of each photo.

Remember, this is only my opinion!
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Old March 1st, 2010, 10:03 AM   #35
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New book highlights North Tyneside’s heritage
March 1st 2010 by Tony Henderson, The Journal



THE heritage highlights of North Tyneside have too often been overshadowed by the attractions of Newcastle and Northumberland. That’s the view of North Tyneside friends Keith Armstrong and Peter Dixon, who set out to rectify the situation. They won the backing of North Tyneside Council and the lottery-funded Awards For All programme to produce their own book of the historic and quirky in the area.

Writer and poet Keith lives in Whitley Bay and Peter, a designer and photographer, has his home in North Shields.

Their new book, From Segedunum to the Spanish City, published at £7, is a mix of historical facts, photographs and poetry contributions by North Tyneside people about their favourite buildings and locations. The book is part of the pair’s Northern Voices Community Projects, which are designed to give local people a voice. Keith said: “We have tried to bring together the broad ranging heritage of North Tyneside and selected a variety of historic buildings which appeal to our sense of pride in the locality where we live. It is a celebration of the unique heritage of a deeply-rooted region and is a portrait of a vibrant and intense culture.”

Among the poetry contributions are humorous verses on the building of Hadrian’s Wall by former Swan Hunters shipyard welder Jack Davitt, who writes under the name of Ripyard Cuddling. Peter said: “A lot of the time these places and buildings are taken for granted.”

Featured in the book are . .

Segedunum Roman fort;
Wallsend Town Hall complex which opened in 1908 and also included police courts, swimming baths and a fire station;
Willington Viaduct and Mill;
Maritime Chambers, Clifford’s Fort, the Master Mariners’ Homes in North Shields;
Knott’s Flats;
Tynemouth Station;
Collingwood Monument;
Tynemouth Castle and Priory;
Cullercoats Watch House;
Spanish City;
St Mary’s Island;
Dial cottage in Killingworth Village;
Burradon Tower;
and,
The 18th Century Backworth Hall and St Alban’s Church, Earsdon.

The book launch was held at another of the buildings in the book – The Grand Hotel in Tynemouth. Originally built as a summer residence in 1872 for the Duchess of Northumberland, it was converted into a hotel in 1877. One of its best known managers was Thomas Tickle, who came to the Grand Hotel in the late 1890s and at one time was responsible for running both the Grand and the Bath Hotel in nearby Tynemouth Village. In 1912 advertisements for The Grand boasted of “28 bedrooms, bathrooms and liveries, hot and cold water and salt supplies”.


North Tyneside's listed buildings passing us by

MORE than two-thirds of young people from North Tyneside quizzed in a survey had never heard of one of the area’s key complexes of listed buildings.
From 1837 a jumble of seven buildings in North Shields town centre served as a base for the Tynemouth Guardians of the Poor, a museum, town hall, mechanics’ institute, fire engine garages, chapel, courts, police cells and council rates department. After lying empty for six years, the Saville Exchange complex was restored in a £3.4m scheme and now includes facilities such as an events and performance space and restaurant.

The survey was carried out at a Young Persons’ Conference in North Tyneside by the council’s cultural services section.

The survey showed that of the 30 young people questioned:

47% had never heard about the council’s holiday activity programmes;

13% had never been to St Mary’s Island and Lighthouse and 17% had never visited Segedunum fort and museum.

49% had not visited the Stephenson Railway Museum.

51% had never attended the Mouth of the Tyne Festival. 15% hadn’t heard of it.

55% said they had not heard of the North Tyneside 10K Road Race.

43% did not know of plans to build a new swimming pool in Wallsend.

Asked how they did hear about cultural services activities, the greatest proportion – 51% – cited word of mouth. A council report on the survey said: “ It is obvious that the current situation is not working. This became apparent from the number of negative responses from young people and how they are unaware of the facilities and services.” Paul Hanson, council director of community services, said: “Thousands of young people in North Tyneside regularly access and enjoy the cultural activities on offer – in fact attendances are increasing. Our aim is to increase this even further and provide new and improved opportunities.”

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; June 24th, 2015 at 10:19 AM.
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Old March 7th, 2010, 11:25 AM   #36
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George & Robert Stephenson: A Passion for Success
Mar 7 2010 by Michael Kelly, Sunday Sun



WAS the father of the railways, George Stephenson, really born in Wylam? Did the term “Geordie“ come from the nickname given to a miners’ lamp he invented? And how did his equally famous son, Robert, turn into the “metropolitan” type his uneducated and proudly North East father loathed?

All the answers can be found in a new book about two of the region’s most famous sons.

You can’t visit picturesque Wylam in Northumberland without a visit to George Stephenson’s birthplace.

The quaint, whitewashed cottage was built in 1760 and was originally used by workers from the local colliery where his father worked. Stephenson lived in one of its four rooms with his parents, Robert and Mabel, and five brothers and sisters.

The other rooms were inhabited by three other families and, in all, 26 people were crammed in between its four walls, like a 19th-Century version of TV programme Shameless.

But was George Stephenson really born there? Author David Ross thinks perhaps not.

During research for his new book George & Robert Stephenson: A Passion for Success, he came across the diaries of Thomas Sopwith, a prominent figure in 19th century Newcastle and a friend of Robert.

In them, he spoke of conversations in which Robert talked of his dad always believing he was born not in Wylam, but in nearby Ovingham. His mother, Mabel, was the daughter of Ovingham dyer Richard Carr and, according to Robert, his dad told him his family had moved to Wylam after he was born.

However, thoughts of ripping the plaque down from the National Trust house might be a bit premature. Joyce Stephenson – no relation – lives in the cottage with her pet dog Chance. She shows visitors round and runs the tea room. Joyce said: “The National Trust have papers that prove he was born here and lived here until he was eight years old.”

Still, it’s an interesting anecdote uncovered by David during his 12 months of research into his subjects. Another is that George, who never went to school as a child, paying his way through evening classes in his teens to learn to read, write and do arithmetic, probably had a learning disorder.

David sent copies of his handwriting to experts at York University and Indiana University in the US. “They came back to me and said the manner of his writing strongly indicated dyslexia.”

But, of course, it didn’t stop him becoming a world renowned civil and mechanical engineer who built the first railway line in the world between Stockton and Darlington to use steam locomotives.

Before he made his name with the railways, he had begun his working life at Black Callerton colliery, where explosions caused by naked flames carried by the miners was rife, killing many. He began working on a safety lamp. At the same time, the eminent scientist Sir Humphry Davy was looking into the same thing and both produced safety lamps which were very similar.

Davy claimed that Stephenson had pinched his idea, but a committee exonerated him.

Davy’s lamp was used across the country except in Stephenson’s native North East where his was used and became known as the “Geordie” lamp in his honour. There is an argument that this is the root of the term “Geordie” used for Newcastle folk. The spat with Davy was to add to Stephenson’s distrust at what he saw as a “metropolitan clique” of scientists and engineers in London.

Ironically, it was to this clique that his only son, Robert, aspired. He had inherited his father’s engineering ability but it was not easy for him being a great man’s son and their relationship was strained.

David said: “Robert had the problem that children of any successful or strong-minded man have – how to become their own person.”

He took the drastic measure of taking a job as a silver mine manager in Colombia in South America for three years.

David continued: “At that time there was a lot of Brits out there. Every time Robert would meet an educated Englishman he would work on his pronunciation to speak “proper” English.

“George took enormous pride in talking Northumbrian. Robert was always concerned to make himself distinct from George.

“When Robert came back he had become a much more independent person, able to cope with his father much better. He very much had his own life and as a result they had a fairly good relationship.”

Robert, among other projects, designed the High Level Bridge in Newcastle and the Royal Border Bridge over the River Tweed. He was also a great joiner of organisations – he became an MP for Whitby until his death in 1859, he was President of the Institution of Civil Engineers and President of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers at separate times, and he was a member of the Athenaeum Club in London alongside his great friend Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

However, according to David, there is one thing they both did – they turned down knighthoods.

“No one has quite figured out why Robert declined because he was a staunch Conservative and keen Royalist.

“I think it’s really because he didn’t want to accept an honour that his father had turned down,” said David.

George & Robert Stephenson – a Passion for Success by David Ross is published by the History Press, price £20, and is now available in book shops.

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; August 29th, 2011 at 10:03 AM.
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Old March 7th, 2010, 03:06 PM   #37
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 8th March 2010 . . (a 'highly appropriate' book this week, considering who the orginator of this thread is!!)

Newcastle - A Study in re-planning at Newcastle upon Tyne
Wilfred Burns
Leonard Hill Books
1967.



It is written by Wilfred Burns, who is someone who greatly influenced the City we all live in today. It really makes for fascinating reading, all the "1960s planning ideas of the time" are discussed, clarified and explained . . by someone who implemented them, right here in our City.

I originally posted details of this book at 'Post 67' on the "Newcastle As it Might Have Been" thread, and received a few comments then . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by toonlad View Post
Lads... you now know what to get me for Christmas!
Quote:
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EDIT: Just found out that Newcastle University Robinson Library hold 5 copies.
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Old March 7th, 2010, 04:13 PM   #38
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One book which I enjoyed is this one "The way things were, a backstreet boyhood " by Denis Cassidy.



It completely avoids the usual sentimentality of some books looking at the past.

It avoids the trap of saying everything in the past was great and everything now is rubbish, which can happen in some books of this type.
It's a real social history of mainly pre-war West end Newcastle life, warts and all.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Way-Things-W...tt_at_ep_dpi_1

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Old March 15th, 2010, 12:14 PM   #39
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 15th March 2010 . .


This book was chosen this week after discussions about it on the Newcastle Interesting Facts and Questions Answered thread, when we were trying (unsuccessfully) to obtain a 'definitive answer' as to the origins of the Vampire Rabbit near St Nicholas Cathedral (see photo of pages 40 & 41 of the book, below) . . .


Hidden Newcastle
Christopher Goulding
Newcastle City Libraries & Arts
1995.




Hidden Newcastle explores the less familiar sights and features of Newcastle. From obscure & forgotten relics to more prominent monuments and architecture, which thousands of people pass every day, but often fail to notice.
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Old March 15th, 2010, 04:00 PM   #40
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So does the book explain the Vampire Rabbit?
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