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Old July 20th, 2010, 10:41 AM   #81
ozzie1980
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I bought a copy from Amazon last night for a fiver! Looking forward to reading it!
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Old July 26th, 2010, 09:57 AM   #82
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 26th July 2010.

Tyneside Then and Now.
Geoff Phillips.
G P Electronic Services.
2002.

There are quite a few books that show Contrast Photos of Newcastle 'as it was' alongside a new photo of Newcastle 'as it is now'.

This is my second choice, from amongst that group of books.

I am not actually showing them in 'datal' order, but this one was published some 28 years after the first book chosen, so the "now" photos are reasonably (though charmingly, often not totally) like things are currently in 2010.

I like this book because of the excellent location choices, but also because there is more 'narrative' about many of the places, than in the first book. Also, it is extended to cover 'Tyneside' (as can be seen from the book title) rather than just Newcastle. However, out of the 78 'then and now comparisons', only four are from outside Newcastle! A very good book though, one that I regularly look through.




The 'Grey Street Cinema' (originally the Newcastle Picture House) in 1922 / The HSBC Bank, in the same building in 2002.


The Barley Mow Public House, in 1920 / Then. all the buildings either side are demolished and it is extended and re-named as 'Stereo', by 2001.

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Old July 29th, 2010, 06:51 PM   #83
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Historian highlights changes in Gateshead
July 29th 2010, by Linda Richards, Evening Chronicle



SAMUEL Johnson once described Gateshead as the “dirty back lane leading to Newcastle” and over the years it has often been portrayed as the poor relation of its more glamorous neighbour across the Tyne.

But in recent years Gateshead has undergone a revival which has placed it firmly on the tourist map. Local historian Nick Neave has focused his camera on Gateshead to show the improvements that have taken place.

The book, “Gateshead Through Time”, is packed with more than 180 photographs showing how the area has changed over the last century.

And by showing now and then pictures side-by-side, Nick, a professor in psychology at Northumbria University, gives a fascinating insight into the regeneration.



The book shows the area’s industrial and social heritage and Nick, who lives in Sunniside, Gateshead, believes it should appeal to young and new alike.

“Children are excited to see how places have changed and for older people it creates a lot of nostalgia,” said Nick, 45, who got the idea some 20 years ago while teaching at Newcastle’s Chillingham Road Primary School.

“I was doing a project with the kids, we had old photographs and we went out to the same spot and took a new shot. It caused a great deal of interest.”

This time, the dad-of-two gathered around 90 photographs of old Gateshead and hit the streets with a pal to take up-to-date shots.

“We had a map and went running around locating places from the old photographs. Sometimes we didn’t have a clue where they were and would speak to people and knock on doors. Some people found out things about their street or house that they didn’t know.”



FULL ARTICLE HERE - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...2703-26955364/


This book (simply because of its 'timely' publication this week!) is the third book in the 'Old & New' Series.
.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; February 14th, 2011 at 10:06 AM.
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 05:16 PM   #84
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 2nd August 2010.

Newcastle Past & Present - Millenium Edition.
Geoff Phillips (With photos by Jack Phillips).
G P Electronic Services.
1999.

There are quite a few books that show Contrast Photos of Newcastle 'as it was' alongside a new photo of Newcastle 'as it is now'.

This is my fourth choice, from amongst that group of books.

This one I like because, instead of the usual TWO photos, it often shows the changes reflected in THREE photos, as in the two pages of examples, shown below.

Some slightly unusual locations and 'angles' are chosen too, and (because it was published in 1999) you also often have the possibility of (this time) a "fourth" photo in your head, reflecting changes over the last eleven years!





Corner of Percy Street / Blackett Street - in 1920, 1950, and 1999 . .



The top of Darn Crook (now called St Andrews Street) in 1890, 1950, and 1999 . .


.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; February 14th, 2011 at 10:07 AM.
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Old August 3rd, 2010, 01:05 AM   #85
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From the book "Gateshead Through Time" (reviewed earlier) . . .

Its amazing that Holy Trinity (the church, its work, its garden, its community relations) have continued so magnificently, right in the middle of a major UK High Street, and despite the several attempts at, er, 'modernisation'.
Not many other Cities or major towns can make that boast.

They've already made the building quite modern and business-like inside
And the folks running Holy Trinity have a package of developments in place to extend and enhance their work and their community relations.

Tesco can do what it wants down the road, but Gateshead's Holy Trinity seems just as determined in its plans for the future!

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Old August 18th, 2010, 12:31 PM   #86
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 16th August 2010.

Newcastle: Then & Now.
Geoff Phillips (With photos from the Steve Wood Collection).
G P Electronic Services.
1997.

There are quite a few books that show Contrast Photos of Newcastle 'as it was' alongside a new photo of Newcastle 'as it is now'.

This is my fifth choice, from amongst that group of books.

This one is in the same series as the "Tyneside Then and Now" book, shown in 'Post 81', but this one covers locations only within the City Boundary and features photos from a different photographic collection, that of photographer Steve Wood . . .





A 'very different from now' stretch of Clayton Street, leading to Blackett Street in 1971 / then again in the 1990s, as it had looked since 1976. It is 'different again' now, in 2010 . .



From the roof of 'Manors Multi-Storey Car Park', the same view taken in the late 1960s and then again in 1997 . .


.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; February 14th, 2011 at 10:07 AM.
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Old August 18th, 2010, 07:32 PM   #87
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Hmm there's a slight inaccuracy with the comment about Manors station at the end there...
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Old August 18th, 2010, 07:47 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CDB00 View Post
Hmm there's a slight inaccuracy with the comment about Manors station at the end there...

What is the inaccuracy?
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Old August 18th, 2010, 07:54 PM   #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
What is the inaccuracy?
It says that Manors station is now underground and part of the metro system.

It fails to mention that the BR Manors Station is still there and not part of the metro system
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Old August 23rd, 2010, 10:35 AM   #90
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 23rd August 2010.

Newcastle Past & Present.
Geoff Phillips/Jack Phillips.
Northern Heritage Consultancy Ltd.
1990.

and

Newcastle Past and Present Special Edition
Geoff Phillips/Jack Phillips.
Northern Heritage Consultancy Ltd.
1994


There are quite a few books that show Contrast Photos of Newcastle 'as it was' alongside a new photo of Newcastle 'as it is now'.

These are my sixth and seventh choices, from amongst that group of books.

The reason I have shown the above TWO together, is because they are essentially the same book, with the 'special edition' being a 1994 update of the original 1990 book. There are, though, some additional/different photos and narratives in the 1994 edition, making it worthy of interest in itself.

One thing I like (which was also an aspect of the larger-sized "Millenium Edition" from the same series of books from the year 2000, shown in 'Post 84') is the fact that there are often THREE photos shown of the same location, at three different dates, instead of the usual two.

Also, of course, because these books were published in 1990 and 1994, we also have our own "2010 eye" in our minds, reflecting changes since then!

Thats why I like these 'then and now' books!!







You can see that it is the same place and same angle for the photo, but WOW - 'big changes' to Lower Pilgrim Street (near the Tyne Bridge/All Saints Office Complex)
between 1925, 1960s and 1990 . .




Corner of Pilgrim Street/Mosely Street 1900 / 1990 - which is all about to change again, with the 'Bank of England' building in the 1990 photo,
seemingly due for demolition soon (though the fight goes on, on that!)



.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; February 14th, 2011 at 10:08 AM.
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Old August 31st, 2010, 11:29 AM   #91
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 30th August 2010.

Tyneside PUBS - Past & Present.
Geoff Phillips/Jack Phillips.
G P Electronic Services.
1994.

There are quite a few books that show Contrast Photos of Newcastle 'as it was' alongside a new photo of Newcastle 'as it is now'.

This weeks choice, my eighth and final one from amongst that group of books, moves us nicely on from the "then and now" theme, into my next proposed group of books . . . which is to be about PUBS (of which this choice is the first!)

There are many 'amazing' contrast photos (then and now) in this weeks book!




The Northumberland Arms on Northumberland Street, shown "as it always was", in 1966, and in the new "post ES version" in 1990 . .


The Portland (my OWN 'in-town' local throughout the 1980s) as it used to look before it had the top level 'chopped off', taken in 1966 and as it is now (in 1990) - ALL GONE . . .


Three shots of that famous place (next to 'The Punch Bowl') the Cradlewell, taken in 1896, 1906 and in the 1990s . .


.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; February 14th, 2011 at 10:09 AM.
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Old September 5th, 2010, 01:55 PM   #92
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 6th September 2010.

Old Pubs of Newcastle.
Geoff Phillips.
G P Electronic Services.
1995.

There are quite a few books that have been written about, and have many excellent photographs of, "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", both past and present.

This weeks choice is my second from amongst that group of books, the first one being last week, which was also the LAST of the 'Newcastle then and now' series.

It is an excellent book, best explained by a note on its own cover . . .

"Why remember the old pubs of Newcastle? For many Tynesiders the pub is their second home, a place to unwind, a place to share a good story or a joke. The pub is a part of the culture of the City, Town and Suburb. It also forms part of the history of many a place, often providing us with a significant part of its architectural heritage."









.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; October 10th, 2010 at 07:32 PM.
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Old September 12th, 2010, 12:16 PM   #93
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 13th September 2010.

Inn Guide to the North East.
Newcastle Inns.
Newcastle Breweries Ltd.
1984.

There are quite a few books that have been written about, and have many excellent photographs of, "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", both past and present.

This weeks choice is my third from amongst that group of books, and is a quite 'different' book, from the rest of those that will be shown in this series. The difference is, that this is a "Guide to the pubs of one particular brewer", and was written BY the brewer for use (at the time) as an aid to people to decide where to go for a meal and/or a night out.

Now (here in 2010) it has become more of a historical record of some of the pubs of the North East, frozen at a moment in time, ie the early-1980s.

Newcastle Inns / Newcastle Breweries / Scottish & Newcastle Breweries, all were/are an important part of the public house scene in our region. Other interesting information about "S&N" (etc) has already been posted on this forum - HERE . . .

Scottish & Newcastle Inns - 150 S&N Pubs of the 1980s
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=862
Scottish & Newcastle Inns - Price List from 1972
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=863
Newcastle Breweries Ltd and the 'Famous Blue Star' - in the early 1960s
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1097
The Geordie Pride, a massive S&N bar opposite Central Station
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=365


Now, back to this weeks book . . .










.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; September 12th, 2010 at 03:23 PM.
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Old September 16th, 2010, 05:16 PM   #94
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Book looks back at Gateshead over century
September 16th 2010, by Linda Richards, Evening Chronicle


Changes to a Tyneside town over a century are caught on camera, in a new book.

For hundreds of years, coal mining was the lifeblood of towns and villages in West Gateshead. Coal was big business, it made landowners rich, put bread on the table for ordinary folk and was the focal point of the community. It shaped the people and the surrounding landscape. Then, the demise of mining led to a decline of industries it fuelled, and the villages that had been a cog in the coal mining machine.

Local historian Nick Neave has focused his camera on Whickham and surrounding areas to chronicle the changes. In his book 'Around Whickham Through Time' he traces how the area has changed and developed.

Armed with old photographs of Whickham, Sunniside, Marley Hill, Lobley Hill, Swalwell and Dunston he went out and about to pinpoint the location in the picture and took a fresh shot to show how it looks today.

The end result is 180 photographs giving a fascinating peek into how places have changed or not.


The CWS Flour Mills at Dunston, how they used to look.


The same view, as it is today.


Dr Neave, a psychologist at Northumbria University, got the idea 20 years ago while carrying out a history project with youngsters at Chillingham Road Primary in Newcastle.

He has also published a similar book about Gateshead but this one was easier because he was able to tap into the archives held by Sunniside Local History Society, of which he is vice-chairman.

“For the Gateshead book I had to do a lot of historical research and poring over maps,” said Dr Neave, 45, who lives in Sunniside. “The help I had from society members was invaluable. They were a treasure trove of information and photographs and they were fantastic in helping me find places.”

“Local people were also a tremendous help. One of the highlights was meeting people in the street and asking them about their area.”


FULL ARTICLE ( AND LOTS MORE PHOTOS ) HERE - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...2703-27280390/
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Old September 19th, 2010, 12:54 PM   #95
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 20th September 2010.

Heady Days, A History of Newcastle's Public Houses : Volume One - The Central Area.
Brian Bennison
Newcastle Libraries & Information Service.
1996.

There are quite a few books that have been written about, and have many excellent photographs of, "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", both past and present.

This weeks choice is my fourth from amongst that group of books, and covers the history of Newcastle Public Houses, in the City Centre.

This book is actually 'Volume One' of a three-part series, that will (when all three are seen) cover West, East and North Newcastle also. Volume One looks at over three hundred pubs that have graced (and occasionally 'disgraced') the City Centre over the last 100 years or so.

The discussions herein, include many great photos as well as descriptions of premises, dates of demise of famous places from the past, as well as stories about famous landlords and drinkers, from many of the City Centre establishments.






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Old September 23rd, 2010, 12:28 AM   #96
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Quote:
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.
'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 24th May 2010.

An "Official City Guide" is produced every so often by the City Council (or by 'the Corporation' as they were still often known, back in 1973) and all of them are interesting and revealing of their time, by the photos and (often) the advertisements that are featured in them. This second one is from 1973.

Newcastle upon Tyne Official City Guide 1973.
Newcastle Corporation.
1973.






Above is the FIRST known use of "The Perceptual map" from the Newcastle Art thread - http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...7&postcount=40

I had always thought that my 1977 newspaper cutting about the Perceptual Map (shown on the Newcastle Art thread) was from when it was first drawn.

I seem to have been wrong about that, as the inside cover of this 1973 'City Guide' states, "The Perceptual map appearing in the centre pages was prepared especially for this 1973 Guide, by Dr Gerald H Fisher, Department of Psychology, University of Newcastle upon Tyne".

This is the first (and only) perceptual map that I have seen which does NOT have the CME (Central Motorway East) on it, as that was not actually completed until 1975.



.

Wow! Didn't know that the Perceptual map went that far back. I didn't start working at the Civic until 1978. The Council map didn't come out until a few years later. If my memory serves me well it was produced by our Graphics dept for the Economic Development section.

GBDT

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; April 29th, 2013 at 10:13 AM.
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Old September 24th, 2010, 02:34 AM   #97
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Wow! Didn't know that the perceptual map went that far back. I didn't start working at the Civic until 1978. The Council map didn't come out until a few years later. If my memory serves me well it was produced by our Graphics dept for the Economic Development section.

GBDT

Knew a lot of people in both 'Graphics' and 'Economic Development' back in the 80s!


EDIT - We can continue discussion on the Skybar?

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; September 24th, 2010 at 11:27 AM.
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Old September 26th, 2010, 08:26 PM   #98
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 27th September 2010.

Heavy Nights, A History of Newcastle's Public Houses : Volume Two - The North and East.
Brian Bennison
Newcastle Libraries & Information Service.
1997.

There are quite a few books that have been written about, and have many excellent photographs of, "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", both past and present.

This weeks choice is my fifth from amongst that group of books, and covers the history of Newcastle Public Houses in North and East Newcastle.

This book is 'Volume Two' of a three-part series, and covers some 300 pubs in the following areas of Newcastle . . . Jesmond, Spital Tongues, Heaton, Gosforth, Fawdon, Coxlodge, Kenton, Shieldfield, Ouseburn, Byker, and Walker, as well as parts of Quayside . . .



The Front Cover shows The Rose & Crown, in Walker Road, in 1908.


These two pages show (Left) the junction of City Road and Tyne Street in 1973 and (Right) The Free Trade Inn, in 1913.



These two pages show (Left) a 1938 advert from 'The Grand' at Byker, and (Right) 'The Royal Oak' on Walker Road in the early 1950s, and 'The Ford Arms' in January 1967.


I love this next photo (though I don't think it has 'scanned in' too well). Inside 'The North Terrace', along Claremont Road, circa 1955. I would just LOVE to walk in there right now!




.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; September 26th, 2010 at 08:42 PM.
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Old September 27th, 2010, 12:29 AM   #99
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Was it the Ford Arms that in later years carried the slogan in huge lettering "Win or Lose, We'll have some Booze"?
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Old October 4th, 2010, 12:27 AM   #100
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Was it the Ford Arms that in later years carried the slogan in huge lettering "Win or Lose, We'll have some Booze"?

That, I don't know Wilf!

Perhaps someone else will know?
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