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Old July 17th, 2017, 06:05 PM   #1141
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100 Walk in Northumberland

By Norman Johnsen 100 Walks in Northumberland




ISBN: 9781785001833
PUBLISHED (THIS EDITION): 05/05/2017
PAGES: 208
BINDING: Paperback
SIZE: 196x128 mm
INSIDE: 100 colour route maps & 1 regional map

Northumberland offers a wide range of delights for the walker - from coastal walks to important historical features such as Hadrian's Wall. This collection of 100 walks of up to 12 miles will help you explore the best of this diverse county.

The Crowood Walking Guides give detailed and accurate route descriptions of the 100 walks. Full-colour mapping is included which is sourced from the Ordnance Survey. Details of where to park and where to eat and drink are included and also places of interest to see along the way.

* Easy-to-follow directions
* Clear and detailed route maps
* Where to park and places to eat and drink
* Interesting sights along the way

RRP: £10.99

Site Price: £8.79
http://www.crowood.com/details.asp?isbn=9781785001833
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Old July 27th, 2017, 01:50 AM   #1142
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The story of Newcastle's hospitals from the Infirmary at Forth Banks to the Keelman's Hospital, and to the present day.
By Tony Henderson, Chronicle Live, 25th July 2017
.
Caring Newcastle: The History of Newcastle's Hospitals and Medical School
Ken Smith and Dr Tom Yellowley
Tyne Bridge Publishing
2017.



From A&E waiting times to bed availability, the NHS is seldom far from the headlines, but at least you don’t need a letter of recommendation from a benefactor to be admitted to hospital – not yet, anyhow. That was the case at the old Newcastle Infirmary, which stood on the site now occupied by the Centre for Life. It opened in 1753, founded by a subscription fund into which well wishers and supporters paid. Those who donated were entitled to give letters recommending admittance for individuals for care and treatment.


Newcastle Infirmary around 1850

The same system was in place for admittance to the Lying-in – or maternity- hospital which was designed by John Dobson and opened in 1826. This building (occupied for many years by the BBC) remains in-situ, opposite the Laing Art Gallery. A subscription fund had opened in 1819 to finance the hospital. Donors could issue one letter of admittance for every guinea they contributed annually. Women also had to produce a marriage certificate.
It is said that how care and treatment is provided is a measure of a society, and Newcastle has a long medical history.

These hospitals and many more from Newcastle's long past, are explored in a new book, Caring Newcastle, by Ken Smith and Dr Tom Yellowley, from Tyne Bridge Publishing at £6.99. For example, there is the current RVI. The Prince of Wales laid the foundation stone for the Royal Victoria Infirmary in 1900, and it opened in 1906. During the First World War the treatment of servicemen saw the RVI outpatients hall become a ward, and Armstrong College, the Hatton Gallery and what would be later be called St Nicholas Hospital converted to caring for military casualties.

Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...banks-13380640

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Old August 6th, 2017, 12:26 PM   #1143
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Summertime childhood memories of Gateshead's ever-popular Saltwell Park

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...shead-13410708
Summertime childhood memories of Gateshead's ever-popular Saltwell Park
David Morton 6 August 2017


Saltwell Park House, Gateshead, home of a museum for many years (Image: Summerhill Books)

In recent years the word ‘staycation’ has become common as people chose to stay in this country rather than go abroad for their holidays. Instead of jetting off to foreign countries, summer days are spent at the seaside or in local parks.

For many years holidays such as this were the norm for North East families who would enjoy their time at the popular destinations of Whitley Bay, Tynemouth, Saltwell Park or Jesmond Dene.

Happy days at Saltwell Park In the 1950s are recalled by local author Kathleen Harrison in her book Memories of Gateshead. Kathleen was born in 1947 in Bensham and she remembers spending her school holidays in the nearby Saltwell Park: “Our first stop was always the lake. Off came our shoes and socks and we sat on the ground with our feet in the water. I remember one particular time by the lake. We, that’s me and my sisters, would have been about nine or ten – I being the oldest of the three girls.

“My new baby brother, born in November 1955, was still under one in the summer of 1956. We had pushed his pram with him in it to the park. Seeing a child pushing a pram around was a regular thing in those days. It was my sister Elizabeth who pushed it that day and she put the brake on the pram which was pointing towards the lake. Well we thought the brake was on … but it wasn’t and the pram rolled into the water. There weren’t any railings or barriers to stop it. Our Elizabeth had to walk into the lake in her socks and shoes and was up to her knees in water. She pushed the pram out whilst I pulled it, using the handle, until it came out. Luckily, the water wasn’t very deep. Only the pram wheels got wet, unlike Elizabeth who had soaking wet shoes and socks and the hem of her dress. Never mind, it was summer and it wasn’t long before she was dry. We never did tell mam because we would have been in trouble.”

‘Memories of Gateshead’ by Kathleen Harrison and ‘Saltwell Park - the Story of the People’s Park’ by Anthea Lang are available from the Chronicle, and from www.summerhillbooks.co.uk
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Old August 7th, 2017, 03:11 PM   #1144
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Exploring the railways of the North East in the 1970s and 80s in a series of great images

Courtesy of the Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...1970s-13424450
Exploring the railways of the North East in the 1970s and 80s in a series of great images
David Morton 7 August 2017


Percy Main, North Tyneside, March 1979, by Kevin McGahon (Image: Kevin McGahon)

In common with many teenage railway enthusiasts on Tyneside in the late 1970s and early 1980s, Colin Alexander clocked up hundreds of miles per day travelling on a variety of classic diesel trains, especially the beloved Deltics.

October half-term week 1979, for example, saw him cover just under 3,000 miles. How did they afford this? The answer is that good old British Rail always had bargains on offer, with the Northumbrian Ranger ticket being the ultimate example. At that time, the princely sum of £2.60 bought seven days of unlimited travel anywhere on the East Coast Main Line between Berwick and York, as well as the Tyne Valley line to Carlisle with its electric exotica and sundry branches to stations such as Whitby and the like.

These images are just some of the 180 that appear in Colin’s new book, Rail Rover, which is published by Amberley, and aims to recapture those happy days of discovery and camaraderie. Colin recalls: “None of my mates at school knew my shameful secret. If they’d known how I spent every Saturday and most holidays, I would have been ridiculed mercilessly. All week I’d dream of Saturday morning when I would escape to Newcastle Central Station with like-minded friends braving all weathers, armed with a platform ticket to watch the trains come and go.”

During the school holidays though, it was the Northumbrian Ranger ticket, costing just £2.60, which gave Colin and his pals the freedom of the North East railways for a full week.

Rail Rover: The Northumbrian Ranger in the 70s & 80s, Amberley Books, is newly published. £14.99.

Read more and see image gallery @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...1970s-13424450

Cc RAIL Transport - in Newcastle and the North East
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Old August 8th, 2017, 12:51 PM   #1145
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One man's mission to raise the profile of Hadrian's Wall on Tyneside

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ofile-13445312
One man's mission to raise the profile of Hadrian's Wall on Tyneside
Tony Henderson 8 August 2017


An impression of how Condercum Roman fort at Benwell in Newcastle would have looked (Image: Handout)

Carving its way through the striking Northumberland landscape, the rural stretches of Hadrian’s Wall command most of the attention.

But now archaeologist Nick Hodgson has set out to raise the profile of the Wall running through Tyneside.

Nick headed the WallQuest community archaeology project, which began in 2012 as a three-year programme, involving 550 local volunteers in examining the urban Roman heritage and on into the Tyne Valley. The £450,000 project, with the Heritage Lottery Fund the main backer, was extended by two years after what Nick describes as the “spectacular” discovery and excavation of the bath house at the Roman fort of Segedunum at Wallsend. It is now on display to visitors.

Nick has written a new book, Hadrian’s Wall on Tyneside, published by Tyne Wear Museums at £4.99 to celebrate WallQuest’s achievements and, he says, “ to show residents and visitors to Tyneside the wealth of Roman archaeology under their feet.”

Urban Tyneside has three of the Wall’s forts –Pons Aelius, over which the Normans built their castle, Condercum at Benwell in the west of the city, and Segedunum. In addition there is the supply base fort for the Wall, Arbeia, at South Shields. “The majority of the archaeological deposits in the forts at South Shields and Wallsend remain to be discovered, “ says Nick.

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ofile-13445312
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Old August 11th, 2017, 03:08 PM   #1146
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Vera author sets new novel in home town of Whitley Bay

From the News Guardian @ http://www.newsguardian.co.uk/news/v...-bay-1-8697703
Vera author sets new novel in home town of Whitley Bay
James Willoughby 11 August 2017


Author Ann Cleeves. Picture by Micha Theiner

Award-winning crime writer Ann Cleeves is about to launch her latest novel, which is partly set in her beloved home town of Whitley Bay. The Seagull is the eighth instalment in the popular DI Vera Stanhope series.

The book focuses on police corruption deep in the heart of a community, and on fragile, and fracturing, family relationships. A cold case takes Vera back in time and very close to home – forcing her to dig deeper into her late father, Hector’s, murky reputation. Vera must confront her prejudices and unwanted memories to dig out the truth, as the past begins to collide dangerously with the present. A visit to her local prison brings DI Stanhope face-to-face with an old enemy; former detective superintendent, and now inmate, John Brace. Brace was convicted of corruption and involvement in the death of a gamekeeper – and Vera played a part in his downfall.

Brace promises Vera information about the disappearance of Robbie Marshall, a notorious wheeler-dealer, if she will look out for his daughter and grandchildren. He tells her that Marshall is dead, his body buried close to St Mary’s Island. However, when a search team investigates, officers find not one skeleton, but two.

Reflecting on the book, Ann said: “I love the fact that this book is set in Whitley Bay. It was such fun to write. The book is dedicated to the regulars in my local pub, The Rockcliffe Arms. I was sitting there listening to their stories and some of them triggered some the plot lines in the book.”

The Seagull is being published by Macmillan on Thursday, September 7, in hardback, priced £16.99.

Read more at: http://www.newsguardian.co.uk/news/v...-bay-1-8697703
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Old August 12th, 2017, 03:44 PM   #1147
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Travel back in time with new book

More coverage in the local press for Ken Hutchinson's latest boojk - from today's News Guardian @ http://www.newsguardian.co.uk/news/t...book-1-8699538
Travel back in time with new book
12 August 2017



A new book offers a nostalgic insight into the illustrious history of two popular North-East seaside towns.

Whitley Bay and Seaton Sluice History Tour, by Ken Hutchinson, guides readers through the streets and alleyways, showing how their famous landmarks used to look and how they’ve changed over the years as well as exploring the lesser-known sights and hidden corners.

With the help of a handy location map in the pocket-sized guide, readers are invited to follow a timeline of events and discover for themselves the changing face of Whitley Bay and Seaton Sluice.

The 96-page book with 50 illustrations, priced at £6.99, is available from bookshops and www.amberley-books.com Pictured above is a view looking west on Whitley Bay’s Front Street, circa 1899.

Read more at: http://www.newsguardian.co.uk/news/t...book-1-8699538
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Old August 14th, 2017, 10:51 AM   #1148
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Book tells the story of rural community

Courtesy of today's Northumberland Gazette @ http://www.northumberlandgazette.co....nity-1-8696066
Book tells the story of rural community
14 August 2017



A new book tells the fascinating history of a rural Northumberland community.

The Records and Recollections of the Aln and Breamish Valleys contains a selection of articles from the journal of the Aln and Breamish Local History Society over a period of around 40 years.

The 350-page book consists of 11 chapters covering a range of topics, including schools and schooldays, farming and wartime.

The book, selected and edited by Bridget Winstanley and published by Clays Ltd, features more than 50 historic photographs. It is available at £7.50 plus £4 for postage and packaging if ordered from Bridget (01669 621241 or bridgetwin [email protected]), with profits to the Aln and Breamish Local History Society.

Copies are available from the Post Offices in Glanton, Alnwick and Morpeth, as well as the Northumberland National Park Information Office in Rothbury.

Read more at: http://www.northumberlandgazette.co....nity-1-8696066
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Old August 15th, 2017, 09:19 AM   #1149
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Periodic List of Books Reviewed on this thread - List 18.


An updated LIST OF BOOKS is produced and posted on this thread after every 25 new book reviews.

The purpose of this periodic listing is to help to make searching for a particular book or subject, on this now VERY LONG thread, just that little bit easier.



List 18 - Books 501 to 525 . . .


501. Geordie Diary 2017: Packed with Local Facts, Dates and Anniversaries - Peter Howard and Marshall D Hall
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1108
502. The New Redheugh Bridge - Tyne & Wear County Council
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1112
503. Sir Joseph Wilson Swan F.R.S. - R.C. Chirnside
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1113
504. Life On The Tyne - Daniel Turner
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1114
505. Abbess Hilda’s First Religious House - Alan Newham
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1115
506. Tyneside Railways: The 1970s and 1980s - Colin Alexander
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1117
507. Elswick Through the Years: in Maps and Pictures - St James’ Heritage & Environment Group and West Newcastle Picture History Collection
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1118
508. It's Grim Up North - Carl Haynes
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1120
509. Terry MAC: Living for the Moment - Autobiography by Terry McDermott (with a Forword by Kevin Keegan)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1121
510. Blyth and Tyne - Stephen Chapman
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1124
511. Northumberland and Tyneside’s War: Voices of the First World War - Neil R Storey and Fiona Kay
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1126
512. Northumberland Words: Glossary Of Words Used In The County Of Northumberland and On The Tyneside, Vol I, published 1893–94 - Richard Oliver Heslop
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1127
513. Newcastle History Tour - Ken Hutchinson
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1128
514. Gosforth Remembered - Andrew Clark and George Nairn
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1129
515. South Shields Through My Lens - Alec Jones
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1130
516. NewcastleCastle: The Gateway to Old Newcastle - NewcastleCastle’s learning and development team
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1132
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1133
517. Rafa's Way: The Resurrection of Newcastle United - Martin Hardy
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1134
518. Learning to Fly - V M Taylor
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1135
519. Jarrow from Old Photographs - Paul Perry
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1136
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1140
520. Whitley Bay & Seaton Sluice History Tour - Ken Hutchinson
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1137
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1147
521. Long Road from Jarrow - Stuart Maconie
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1138
522. One Hundred Walks in Northumberland - Norman Johnsen
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1141
523. Caring Newcastle: The History of Newcastle's Hospitals and Medical School - Ken Smith and Dr Tom Yellowley
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1142
524. Saltwell Park: the Story of the People’s Park - Anthea Lang
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1143
525. Rail Rover: The Northumbrian Ranger in the 70s & 80s - Colin Alexander
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1144
Current END of Book Reviews List.



Previous Periodic Lists, posted earlier in this thread, can be found at . . .

List 01 - Book Reviews 001 to 092 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=152
List 02 - Book Reviews 093 to 116 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=194
List 03 - Book Reviews 117 to 140 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=223
List 04 - Book Reviews 141 to 166 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=298
List 05 - Book Reviews 167 to 200 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=372
List 06 - Book Reviews 201 to 225 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=436
List 07 - Book Reviews 226 to 250 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=509
List 08 - Book Reviews 251 to 275 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=582
List 09 - Book Reviews 276 to 300 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=649
List 10 - Book Reviews 301 to 325 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=716
List 11 - Book Reviews 326 to 350 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=789
List 12 - Book Reviews 351 to 375 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=862
List 13 - Book Reviews 376 to 400 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=938
List 14 - Book Reviews 401 to 425 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=974
List 15 - Book Reviews 426 to 450 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1016
List 16 - Book Reviews 451 to 475 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1059
List 17 - Book Reviews 476 to 500 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1111



Also, a FULL list of ALL books reviewed on this thread can always be found on the INDEX THREAD under "B" for Books, see link below . . .

Index - All Book Reviews from 001 to Latest : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...21&postcount=7 .('Scroll Down' this page, to BOOKS.)

.
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Old August 18th, 2017, 01:28 PM   #1150
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Striking photographs of Newcastle's West End showing life in the 1970s and 80s to live on

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...t-end-13493811
Striking photographs of Newcastle's West End showing life in the 1970s and 80s to live on
Mike Kelly 18 August 2017


Youth Unemployment, 1981, by Tish Murtha (Image: Ella Murtha)

Evocative pictures of Newcastle’s West End taken in the late 1970s and early 1980s by talented photographer Tish Murtha are now to be published in a book thanks to a successful appeal for funding.

A Kickstarter campaigner was launched last month to raise £8,000 from the public to finance it which was expected to last 30 days. But donations from people all over the world who were impressed by Tish’s pictures meant the target was hit within 12 hours. With the campaign due to end on Friday, the amount raised has exceeded £18,000.

Tish, from South Shields, died in 2013 on the day before her 57th birthday from a brain aneurysm. Her daughter, Ella Murtha, is delighted that a fitting tribute to her mum’s talent will soon hit the book shops. Ella, 33, who lives in Stockton, Teesside, said: “I’m a bit overwhelmed. I don’t know whether to laugh or cry or to explain exactly what to feel. I was hoping the campaign would make just enough to fund the book and it has far exceeded expectations. The money has come from all over the world, from America and Brazil.”

Now, Bluecoat Press will publish a volume containing the pictures called Youth Unemployment as a limited edition hardback book of around 180 pages in October.

Read more and see image gallery @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...t-end-13493811
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Old August 21st, 2017, 11:25 AM   #1151
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Telling the story of an important wartime base

Courtesy of the Northumberland Gazette @ http://www.northumberlandgazette.co....base-1-8709532
Telling the story of an important wartime base
20 August 2017



A history buff has released a comprehensive book about one of northern England’s most important fighter fields during the Second World War.

RAF Acklington: Guardian of the Northern Skies has been written by professional photographer Malcolm Fife. The book is based on original and unpublished records and documentation and features many photographs never before seen in print. There is also an appendix with detailed list of all units based at RAF Acklington.

At the beginning of the Second World War, RAF Acklington was the most important fighter station in north-east England. It started life in 1938 as a training base for RAF aircrews, but with the outbreak of hostilities against Germany, it was given the role of protecting the skies over Newcastle and its industrial heartland. Its Spitfires and Hurricanes were soon in action against Luftwaffe bombers and many of the earliest raids of the war took place over this part of Britain. Due to the importance of this region with its major ports and industries, it continued to attract the attention of enemy bombers long after the Battle of Britain had been won. By late 1940, most attacks took place after dark and RAF Acklington became the host for night-fighter squadrons. Unlike many military airfields, it did not close when hostilities ceased. Initially, it reverted to its training role, but in 1957 it again became the base for fighter aircraft.

The airfield spent its last years as 6 Flying Training School but due to defence cuts, it became surplus to requirements and closed in the 1970s.

Published by Fonthill Media, the book (ISBN 978-1-78155-622-1) is £18.99, paperback.

Read more at: http://www.northumberlandgazette.co....base-1-8709532
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 06:27 PM   #1152
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Charlie Kray, Operation Acid, and the Geordie connection - the story is revealed

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ordie-13512232
Charlie Kray, Operation Acid, and the Geordie connection - the story is revealed
David Morton 22nd August 2017


The book Operation Acid, by Steve Wraith, has just been published (Image: Handout, Publicity Picture)

The story of gangland twins Reggie and Ronnie Kray, their rise, and eventual fall, has been extensively documented.

During the 1950s and 60s, the pair ruled London’s East End - and had widespread interests far beyond their native territory. The reign of the Krays, and their gang, came to an end in 1969 when after one of the most high-profile trials in British legal history, Reggie and Ronnie received life terms for the murders of rival gangsters George Cornell and Jack ‘The Hat’ McVitie.

Even with pair behind bars, however, the legend of the twins would continue to grow and fascinate. Three decades after the Krays’ heyday, 16-year-old Steve Wraith, doing his GCSEs at school, picked up a copy of John Pearson’s A Profession of Violence - the Krays’ biography - and lives would change. Wraith became a close friend and confidante to the twins during their final years of imprisonment.

But one factor which is often overlooked is the impact of the twins’ elder sibling, Charlie Kray, and his involvement in the ‘family business’. Now, in his newly published book, Steve Wraith brings to light the tale of Operation Acid, and the investigation by Northumbria and the Metropolitan Police into Charlie, and the cocaine ‘sting’ which he fell for in 1996 affording a surprise ending to the Krays story. Over the last 15 years Steve has released several books on the enduring phenomenon of the twins.

He says: “My relationship and subsequent friendship with Charlie was different, unique to that of the twins as he was a free man. This book tells the story of Charlie and the latter part of his life but, like other Kray books, the stage has to be set with the story of the twins and of how I got to know them. The main focus though will see unpublished transcripts and photographs relating to the undercover operation, which pinned the final Kray, and provides an interesting insight into how the police worked back then.”

Operation Acid: The Downfall of Charlie Kray, by Steve Wraith, is published by David McCaffrey. Price £12.99. The book is available from The Back Page, Newcastle; WH Smith; and is available online at http://www.thesayers.bigcartel.com/

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ordie-13512232
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Old August 23rd, 2017, 11:13 AM   #1153
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When Whitley Bay was a holiday resort nicknamed the 'Blackpool of the North East'

Courtesy of the Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...named-13506820
When Whitley Bay was a holiday resort nicknamed the 'Blackpool of the North East'
David Morton 21 August 2017


The South Pole 'experience' In 1912, Whitley Bay (Image: Summerhill Books)

As this year’s summer holiday season slowly draws to a close, let us recall when Whitley Bay was a major destination for holidaymakers and day trippers.

Local author Charlie Steel has written a history of the town in his book Whitley Bay Remembered Part One: The Coast. He recalls the many attractions of the seaside resort: “‘Miles of Golden Curving Sand’ is how the coastline of Whitley Bay was described on a postcard in the 1960s. This was a simple and honest marketing description of a picturesque area. There were typical seaside shops, amusements, excellent transport links, a long golden sandy beach, a lighthouse, and a promenade with beachside cafes such as Panama House and the Rendezvous. There were rentable beach huts, windbreaks, deck chairs and a paddling pool. Regular carnivals took place along the Promenade and bands would play on the Links, which was also home to the annual flower show. “

Charlie also pointed out how there was quality and low-cost accommodation, with hotels and countless guest houses offering bed and breakfast to the thousands of holidaymakers who once flocked to the town. And, of course, the Spanish City funfair was the highlight for many.

Charlie added: “Between the two World Wars, Whitley Bay was frequently advertised as the ‘Blackpool of the North East’. The theatre in the Spanish City became the Empress Ballroom with space for 750 dancers and, like Blackpool, it was felt the complex needed a Winter Garden as an extra attraction. he first-floor Empress Rotunda was converted into the Winter Garden and opened in 1935 as a place where bands played and good music could be heard uninterrupted by the weather.

By the early 1950s, the Spanish City was booming as paid holidays became common and hordes of Scottish workers with their families descended on Whitley Bay during Glasgow Fair Week as factories closed for the annual holidays. From the 1950s, many new fairground rides came into being which included roundabouts, and swings, and later attractions included novelties such as the ghost train, the demon’s den, dodgems and the corkscrew ride.”

Whitley Bay Remembered Part One: The Coast, by Charlie Steel is available from the Chronicle front reception, and from www.summerhillbooks.co.uk

Read more and see image gallery @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...named-13506820
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Old August 23rd, 2017, 11:27 AM   #1154
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From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ordie-13512232
Charlie Kray, Operation Acid, and the Geordie connection - the story is revealed
David Morton 22nd August 2017


The book Operation Acid, by Steve Wraith, has just been published (Image: Handout, Publicity Picture)

The story of gangland twins Reggie and Ronnie Kray, their rise, and eventual fall, has been extensively documented.

During the 1950s and 60s, the pair ruled London’s East End - and had widespread interests far beyond their native territory. The reign of the Krays, and their gang, came to an end in 1969 when after one of the most high-profile trials in British legal history, Reggie and Ronnie received life terms for the murders of rival gangsters George Cornell and Jack ‘The Hat’ McVitie.

Even with pair behind bars, however, the legend of the twins would continue to grow and fascinate. Three decades after the Krays’ heyday, 16-year-old Steve Wraith, doing his GCSEs at school, picked up a copy of John Pearson’s A Profession of Violence - the Krays’ biography - and lives would change. Wraith became a close friend and confidante to the twins during their final years of imprisonment.

But one factor which is often overlooked is the impact of the twins’ elder sibling, Charlie Kray, and his involvement in the ‘family business’. Now, in his newly published book, Steve Wraith brings to light the tale of Operation Acid, and the investigation by Northumbria and the Metropolitan Police into Charlie, and the cocaine ‘sting’ which he fell for in 1996 affording a surprise ending to the Krays story. Over the last 15 years Steve has released several books on the enduring phenomenon of the twins.

He says: “My relationship and subsequent friendship with Charlie was different, unique to that of the twins as he was a free man. This book tells the story of Charlie and the latter part of his life but, like other Kray books, the stage has to be set with the story of the twins and of how I got to know them. The main focus though will see unpublished transcripts and photographs relating to the undercover operation, which pinned the final Kray, and provides an interesting insight into how the police worked back then.”

Operation Acid: The Downfall of Charlie Kray, by Steve Wraith, is published by David McCaffrey. Price £12.99. The book is available from The Back Page, Newcastle; WH Smith; and is available online at http://www.thesayers.bigcartel.com/

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ordie-13512232
I suppose this will have to do until his Pulitzer-prize winning book on granny murderers comes out...
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Old August 31st, 2017, 03:45 PM   #1155
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Secret Gateshead

Secret Gateshead By Rob Kirkup



Gateshead has often been portrayed as the ‘poor relative’ in comparison to its larger and more glamorous Tyneside neighbour, Newcastle. But Gateshead has a long and proud industrial and social history, much of which has sadly gone, but in recent years there has been a revival in Gateshead’s social and cultural infrastructure, which has placed it firmly on the tourist map.

The twentieth and twenty-first centuries wrought huge changes on Gateshead, but traces of the town’s fascinating history are visible to the enquiring eye. Local author Rob Kirkup delves into the past in this unique approach to the town’s history, blending dark deeds and strange tales with long-forgotten facts and amusing stories, seeking out Gateshead’s many hidden secrets.

Book ISBN 9781445666389

Book Format Paperback

pages 96 pages

Publication Date 15 Aug 2017

Height 234

Width 165

Illustrations 100

Amberley Publising @ https://www.amberley-books.com/secret-gateshead.html
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Old September 2nd, 2017, 05:43 PM   #1156
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Northumbria academic publishing story of Martin Luther King's historic Newcastle visit

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...artin-13545146
Northumbria academic publishing story of Martin Luther King's historic Newcastle visit
By Kali Lindsay 2 August 2017


Dr Martin Luther King, the American civil rights leader, pictured at Newcastle University

A new book about Martin Luther King’s historic visit to Newcastle will mark the 50th anniversary of the event. Martin Luther King visited the city on November 13, 1967 to accept an honorary doctorate in civil law from Newcastle University.

Brian Ward, Northumbria University’s professor in American studies, has written a book discussing the historic significance and contemporary relevance of Dr King’s visit to the history of the North East, Britain and US. It tells the inside story of Dr King’s visit and explains why he was invited to Newcastle, the events of the day itself and why he flew across the Atlantic to spend less than 11 hours in the city, which he knew little about.

Brian discovered film of Dr King’s ‘lost’ Newcastle speech and puts the civil right leader’s inspiring words into the context of 1960s British and US race relations, writing about their continued relevance and importance in 2017. He said: “The book explains the significance of Dr King’s visit both in terms of British and US society in the 1960s and in terms of historic links between the North East and the African American freedom struggle. Given that King was not even supposed to speak it’s wonderful we can now be inspired by the call he made in Newcastle to confront the global problems of racism, poverty and war. Those words still have tremendous relevance.”

Brian also shows how Dr King was one of many distinguished African American visitors to the region, including Olaudah Equiano and Frederick Douglass before him and Muhammad Ali and Harry Belafonte afterwards, explaining how those connections influenced the development of race relations in the region.

The book is part of Freedom City 2017 which is a city-wide arts and cultural programme aiming to build on the legacy of Dr King who was assassinated just months later. The book will be launched at Newcastle City Library on September 13 at 6pm.

Read more and see video @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...artin-13545146

The book is currently on sale at the likes of the Central Library - saw it there the other day.
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Old September 5th, 2017, 01:09 PM   #1157
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Glimpses of Old Newcastle

Glimpses of Old Newcastle a new publication from Summerhill Books @ http://www.summerhillbooks.co.uk/pro...old-newcastle/



By Andrew Clark

‘Glimpses of Old Newcastle’ is a collection of picture postcards, archive photographs, adverts and memories that show how the city has changed over the years. Over 150 illustrations show Newcastle’s past with the changing city centre and images of old streets, buildings, cafés, shops and markets. Also featured are photographs of the riverside, famous bridges and Newcastle at work. Favourite former cinemas and pubs are remembered as well as the terraces of St James’ Park.

£4.99 from http://www.summerhillbooks.co.uk/pro...old-newcastle/
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Old September 11th, 2017, 01:01 PM   #1158
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Take a glimpse of old Newcastle in a series of stunning archive photographs

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Glimpses of Old Newcastle a new publication from Summerhill Books @ http://www.summerhillbooks.co.uk/pro...old-newcastle/



By Andrew Clark

‘Glimpses of Old Newcastle’ is a collection of picture postcards, archive photographs, adverts and memories that show how the city has changed over the years. Over 150 illustrations show Newcastle’s past with the changing city centre and images of old streets, buildings, cafés, shops and markets. Also featured are photographs of the riverside, famous bridges and Newcastle at work. Favourite former cinemas and pubs are remembered as well as the terraces of St James’ Park.

£4.99 from http://www.summerhillbooks.co.uk/pro...old-newcastle/
From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...eries-13601633
Take a glimpse of old Newcastle in a series of stunning archive photographs
David Morton 11 September 2017


Eldon Square around 1910. On the left is the east terrace – the only original side to remain after the west and north terraces were pulled down, from the book Glimpses of Newcastle, by Andrew Clark (Image: Summerhill Books)

A new book from Tyneside publisher Summerhill Books gives a fascinating glimpse into the history of Newcastle.

Local author Andrew Clark has collected old picture postcards, archive photographs, adverts and memories showing how the city has changed over the years. There are over 150 illustrations of Newcastle’s past with images of the city centre, local streets, buildings, cafés, shops and markets. Also featured are photographs of the riverside, the famous bridges and Newcastle at work. Favourite former cinemas and pubs are remembered, as well as the terraces of St James’ Park.

Andrew said: “I started the research for this book over 10 years ago when I was working on history projects in local schools and youth centres. I would show old photographs of Newcastle to the young people and I was amazed by their reactions. They would be fascinated by the images and we would compare them with similar present-day views. The young people also enjoyed going out into the streets with cameras to try to capture ‘then and now’ photographs. Earlier this year I was looking for a new subject for my next book and I came across some of the work I had done in the schools and youth centres. I thought this would be the ideal starting point for my book. However, I did have one problem. ome of the then and now photographs we had done 10 years ago were already out of date. Newcastle is constantly changing so I went on a tour of the city with my camera. Taking these ‘now’ pictures is often a hazardous task.”

Andrew continued: “A hundred years ago you could take your time setting up your photograph in the middle of Grainger Street or Shields Road and not worry about cars or buses. Try doing that now with today’s traffic! Although there are a few old photographs that show that even in the 1920s there were some traffic problems with white-gloved policemen directing the cars and horse-drawn vehicles at busy junctions. As well as then and now images there are also many photographs in the book that show the wonderful social history of Newcastle. Images of work include mining, shipbuilding, quarries, potteries, windmills and even cigarette factories. Old cinemas are recalled such as the Odeon, the Grainger, the Queens and four in a short stretch of Westgate Road – the Gaumont, Essoldo, the Stoll and the Pavilion.

Read more, see video and image gallery @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...eries-13601633
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Old September 15th, 2017, 02:59 PM   #1159
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The life and soul of Johnny Handle

From today's Hexham Courant @ http://www.hexham-courant.co.uk/news...c2a3b3a49fd-ds
The life and soul of Johnny Handle
15 September 2017



ERIC Burdon once said that the first time he heard House of the Rising Sun, it was being sung in a Newcastle club by the then young Northumbrian folk singer Johnny Handle.

During the same period, in the early 1960s, one Luke Kelly was working as a porter in Newcastle and going along to the folk club established by Handle in the city’s Bridge tavern. Kelly later said he “went home and founded the Dubliners”. And Tynedale’s own Mike Tickell, who subsequently became good friends with Handle, said hearing a radio show in 1962 that included Handle singing one of his own songs, The Collier Lad, was a seminal moment for him. As Tickell told Ovingham musician and latterly author Pete Wood, his father had been a miner, but this was the first mining song he’d heard. “It seemed to free something up,” said Tickell. His songwriting came from direct experience. He uses people and places just like the ballads.”

Pete Wood, for one, thought a biography of the man widely regarded as the most important folk musician in the North-East was long overdue. “I couldn’t believe nobody else had done it,” he said. “There are much better writers than me around, but I just felt the story had to be told.” Johnny Handle: Life and Soul was duly self-published this summer. And let me contradict the unassuming author right now – for he has produced a smashing read. More than that, he has written a book that is bigger than the sum of its parts. This is not only a biography of Handle, but an important social history of the people and the folk music that have characterised Newcastle and the Tyne Valley during the past 50 years.

Handle was born in Wallsend in 1935 and his early years were spent in Walker, on the outskirts of Newcastle, surrounded by the pits and the industry that have informed so much of his music. However, the Second World War brought him to the Tyne Valley when his father, a teacher, moved with his pupils being evacuated to the makeshift school set up for them in Beaufront Castle, visible from the A69 midway between Hexham and Corbridge. Johnny stayed with his mum in a cottage half-a-mile away and attended the local school at Beaufront, rather than the evacuee school. The sights and people he came across during the four or five years he was there have stayed with him ever since, and his subsequent love of the countryside led him to buy the three acres of land at Bardon Mill he has used as a bolt-hole ever since.

A thorough biography that follows every meander and occasional right-hand turn in Handle’s life, we learn about the jazz years (during which he balked at the lack of structure in modern jazz) and the ‘early folk club’ years that superseded them, between 1958 and 1965, when many of the folk that people this story first began to appear – Ewan McColl, Martin Carthy, Alistair Anderson, Ray Laidlaw, John Doonan, Benny Graham and Christine Hendry among them. Brimming with anecdotes that will take the reader down memory lane, up the Tyne Valley and across the region, Johnny Handle: Life and Soul is Pete’s third book.

Read more @ http://www.hexham-courant.co.uk/news...c2a3b3a49fd-ds
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Old September 15th, 2017, 03:35 PM   #1160
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Girl From The Tyne
Melody Sachs
Published by Zaffre
2017.



Set during WW2 in Newcastle, ballroom dancer Alice Rooney seduces Jack Wood, a local boy from a good Tyneside family. With a little one on the way, Jack is forced in to a shotgun marriage. He vows to protect his baby daughter but his marriage is volatile from the start. Damaged by her own dysfunctional childhood Alice shows not a scrap of affection towards little Lizzie. As Alice feels more trapped and unhappy, Lizzie becomes the focus of her frustration and anger. Lizzie's saving grace is her loving grandmother, Mrs Wood, who does her best to improve life for her whenever she can.

When Jack is drafted in to the Air Force at the start of WW2, Lizzie is left alone with her unstable mother and life becomes almost unbearable.

It's only when Mrs Wood steps in and introduce Lizzie to the Madame Bella's Academy for the theatrical arts, that Lizzie blossoms. Though still very young and innocent, will Lizzie fulfil her dream to escape her mother's clutches and leave Newcastle behind to pursue a glittering theatrical future? And will she be safe, if she does?

About the Author . .

Newcastle-born Melody Sachs had an early start in pantomime at the Theatre Royal before moving to London at eighteen and becoming a West End performer. In 1960, she married her late-husband Andrew Sachs, a national treasure who many will remember for his role of Manuel in Fawlty Towers. Melody herself once appeared alongside Andrew in an episode of Fawlty Towers, as well as writing short stories and sketches and for the BBC.

Melody went on to study antique textiles and design, and opened her first shop in the eighties in Hampstead, specialising in wedding gowns. Her creations frequently featured in Tatler, Brides and Wedding magazines. She designed for celebrities, including Boy George for his Japanese tour, and Barbara Kelly for the entire series of What's My Line. One of her most memorable designs was the gown she created for Lady Glenconner to attend a ball at Buckingham Palace in honour of the King of Spain.

The Girl from the Tyne is Melody’s first novel and one that she has dedicated to the husband who inspired her. She is currently working on the second book in her 'Tyneside Series' of stories.
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