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Old October 4th, 2010, 12:37 AM   #101
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 4th October 2010.

Lost Weekends, A History of Newcastle's Public Houses : Volume Three - The West.
Brian Bennison
Newcastle Libraries & Information Service.
1998.


There are quite a few books that have been written about, and have many excellent photographs of, "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", both past and present.

This weeks choice is my sixth from amongst that group of books, and covers the history of Newcastle Public Houses in West Newcastle.

This book is 'Volume Three' of a three-part series, and covers some 300 pubs, being an 'exploration' of the licensed houses of the following areas of Newcastle . . . Arthur's Hill, Westgate, Elswick, Scotswood Road, then the rest of Scotswood, and through Benwell, Bell's Close, Lemington, Newburn, Throckley, Westerhope, Cowgate, and Walbottle.



The Front Cover shows The Green Tree, Laurel Street, Scotswood - in 1958.










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Old October 4th, 2010, 05:46 PM   #102
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That book ^ is my favourite. An excellent resource for the pubs of Scotswood Road.

Was there also a book by Geoff Philip about the pubs of Scotswood Rd?
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Old October 4th, 2010, 06:32 PM   #103
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Quote:
Originally Posted by merleb View Post
That book ^ is my favourite. An excellent resource for the pubs of Scotswood Road.

Was there also a book by Geoff Philip about the pubs of Scotswood Rd?

Hi merleb,

There is a book called "Scotswood Road Pubs" by Jimmy Forsyth. Could that be the one that you mean?

It will be making an appearance later in the series!
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Old October 4th, 2010, 11:01 PM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Originally Posted by WilfBurnsFan
Was it the Ford Arms that in later years carried the slogan in huge lettering "Win or Lose, We'll have some Booze"?

Newcastle Historian;64748545
That, I don't know Wilf!

Perhaps someone else will know?
Close Wilf. Here is a photo of Jackies Bar on Wilfred Street, which used to be The Ford pub.

GBDT


image hosted on flickr



p.s. NH, I did it first time - got the photo to diplay without your help!
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Old October 5th, 2010, 12:44 AM   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
Hi merleb,

There is a book called "Scotswood Road Pubs" by Jimmy Forsyth. Could that be the one that you mean?

It will be making an appearance later in the series!
Ah Jimmy was it? Thanks NH, looking forward to seeing it again. I got it out of the library about 15 years ago and it was very good.
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Old October 7th, 2010, 02:59 PM   #106
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Autobiography that's a tale of three Viz kids
October 7th 2010, Evening Chronicle



FUNNYMAN Simon Donald’s autobiography goes on sale today.

Here is an exclusive extract in which he reveals some of the earlier versions of the mag which would make his family famous . . .

“IT was a very exciting day when Chris told me he and his friend Jim were going to produce a ‘proper’ comic, and they wanted me to do some work for it. Between the ages of about nine and 13 I’d been obsessed with the idea of being a comic artist.

My interests had moved on slightly by the time I reached 14 or so, and although still an avid comic collector, I was now more interested in listening to loud music.

Chris had been very keen on making magazines since an early age. His first effort had been the Lily Crescent Locomotive Times, a magazine with a rather limited target readership, specifically the children living in Lily Crescent, more specifically the children living in Lily Crescent who were interested in trainspotting.

Readership totalled about six, including Chris himself.

The Lily Crescent Locomotive Times did have one contributor other than Chris, and remarkably this reporter wasn’t even a resident of Lily Crescent. Jim Brownlow was the paper’s Heaton Sidings Correspondent.

Their friendship and love of bizarre and extreme humour would bring about the birth of Viz.

Chris had produced a number of comic strips at school called the Fat Crusader books. These were passed around his friends and featured many of them in cameo roles, the hero himself being the alter ego of one of his classmates, the extremely mild-mannered Chris Scott-Dixon.

The strips usually involved some trouble beginning with one teenage social group or other turning up. In graphic, gory detail the Fat Crusader would dispatch them by varied and most imaginative means.

These comic books weren’t publications as such; they were one-off pieces of artwork that weren’t reproduced.

Him Off The Viz, published by Tonto Books, is on sale today in all leading bookstores, priced £16.99.


Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...#ixzz11g3JONmA
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Old October 10th, 2010, 07:17 PM   #107
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 11th October 2010.

Scotswood Road PUBS.
Jimmy Forsyth
Newcastle City Libraries.
1988.

There are quite a few books that have been written about, and have many excellent photographs of, "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", both past and present.

This weeks choice is my seventh from amongst that group of books, and has been chosen "by request" . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by merleb View Post
The 'Lost Weekends' book is my favourite. An excellent resource for the pubs of Scotswood Road. Was there also a book by Geoff Phillips, about the pubs of Scotswood Rd?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
Hi merleb, Maybe there is, but there is definitely a book called "Scotswood Road Pubs" by Jimmy Forsyth. Could that be the one that you mean? It will be making an appearance later in the series!
Quote:
Originally Posted by merleb View Post
Ah Jimmy was it? Thanks NH, looking forward to seeing it again. I got it out of the library about 15 years ago and it was very good.










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Old October 10th, 2010, 07:47 PM   #108
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That looks good - I'll have to see if I can root a copy out somewhere. Another great pub book is Lynn Pearson's Northumbrian Pubs - the Duke of Cumberland (above) looks very similar to some of the Felling pubs she covered, by the practice of Septimus Oswald (I think). Big towers, domes, very impressive, no expense spared!
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Old October 10th, 2010, 08:35 PM   #109
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Is the Duke of Cumberland Pub (above) on the same street that The Globe is still on now?

edit no it isnt - the Globe is at the bottom of Plummer St

Last edited by merleb; October 10th, 2010 at 08:42 PM. Reason: got a fact wrong
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Old October 17th, 2010, 01:21 PM   #110
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 18th October 2010.

Tyneside's Bygone Boozers.
Geoff Phillips
G P Electronic Services.
1994.

There are quite a few books that have been written about, and have many excellent photographs of, "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", both past and present.

This weeks choice is my eighth from amongst that group of books, and is a small, but excellent, book full of great photos and details. More details of the book are in the second of the four scans, below . . .







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Old October 18th, 2010, 05:14 PM   #111
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Westenders, by Yvonne Young (with photos by Jimmy Forsyth)
Published 2010






.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; October 24th, 2010 at 03:14 AM.
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Old October 23rd, 2010, 09:32 PM   #112
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 25th October 2010.

Brewers & Bottlers of Newcastle upon Tyne - from 1850 to the present day.
Brian Bennison
Newcastle upon Tyne City Libraries & Arts.
1995.

This book, the ninth in this short series about "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", is pehaps my favourite.

As can be seen from the title, this book not only covers the pubs, but also the 'brewers and bottlers', and is all the more fascinating for that!

The narrative is VERY informative, and the photos are quite rare, many of them not seen anywhere else . . .














I just had to include, as one of the example pages, the last one (above) which included The Midland.

In the early 1980s, I had some memorable times there, it wasn't the venue I frequented the most (I think The Portland and the Burton House jointly hold that record!) but some of the occasions I was there, long stick in the mind.

Great days!!

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Old October 26th, 2010, 05:09 PM   #113
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New book shows the history of the Whitley Bay Dome
October 26th 2010, by Tony Henderson, Evening Chronicle



This famous seaside landmark took just 82 days to build.

But the Spanish City Dome at Whitley Bay - opened a century ago - has established itself as a long-lasting object of affection for thousands of people.

More than 15,000 turned out over two weekends last month to tour the listed Dome, which is being restored.

Now a new book has been published to mark the Spanish City centenary.

Produced by Northern Voices Community Projects and backed by North Tyneside Council, it tells the story of the Spanish City site and the Dome, and includes poetry and memories of fans of the site.

Keith Armstrong is editor of the £5 book The Spanish City: the Heart and Soul of Whitley Bay.

He said: “People have fantastic memories of the Spanish City, which I would like to see put to use as some form of cultural centre.”

Glynis Barrie, council cabinet member for community services, said: “As a council we are very proud of our heritage and the Spanish City holds so many memories for local people and visitors.”

North Tyneside mayor Linda Arkley said: “Support for this book is part of our programme to mark the centenary of the Spanish City Dome. Our aspirations for the future are to continue to restore the Spanish City to where it can once more become the heart and soul of Whitley Bay.”

The Spanish City also appears in the background of a 1957 British Railways travel poster for Whitley Bay, which is expected to fetch between £600-£800 at a Christies auction in London next month.

Work began in 1909 on the Spanish City complex, with its 73ft high Dome, restaurant, roof garden and 1,400-seat Empress Theatre, which staged acts such as Miss Federica’s Performing terriers, the Lizelle Troupe of Lady Acrobats, comedians Claremont and Victor, comedy and burlesque boxing act Fame and Fortune, and the Blue Hungarian Band.

Attractions at the Spanish city funfair included the Social Whirl, Water Chute, Rainbow Pleasure Wheel, Joy Wheel, and Ye Olde Mill featuring a tunnel where boats floated past a Swiss valley, fairy castle, and an Indian jungle.

In 1920 the theatre became the Empress Ballroom which accommodated 900 dancers.


Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...#ixzz13TgB5MDU
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Old October 31st, 2010, 02:27 PM   #114
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 1st November 2010.

The Northumbrian Pub, an Architectural History
Lynn F Pearson
Sandhill Press
1989.

This book, the tenth one in this short series about "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", is unusual in that it is one I have not read myself, but it comes recommended . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by WilfBurnsFan; October 10th 2010
Another great pub book is Lynn Pearson's Northumbrian Pubs - the Duke of Cumberland (in the 'Scotswood Road PUBS' book) looks very similar to some of the Felling pubs she covered, by the practice of Septimus Oswald (I think). Big towers, domes, very impressive, no expense spared!
I think I will definitely try to get hold of a copy, but in the meantime . . .





also, the book is described on its own dust jacket, as . . .


Quote:
To demonstrate that the pub is much more than just a building in a landscape, the author has gathered together strands of information on architecture, brewers, the local economy and social history and through the buildings themselves, shows why our local pubs look as they do today.

Examples are drawn from urban, country and coastal pubs, some now demolished, reaching from the Georgian era to the present day and beyond.

The trail of discovery takes the reader from the crowded city of Newcastle upon Tyne, through the quayside, then along the coast, out into Weardale and along the North Tyne Valley.

Much fascinating detail is given as the pubs are described, and the influence of the important brewing industries, and local architects, are examined.

Lavishly illustrated with an extensive bibliography

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; November 6th, 2010 at 04:55 PM.
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Old November 6th, 2010, 05:02 PM   #115
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 8th November 2010.

The Burglars Dog - Alternative Guide to Drinking in Newcastle upon Tyne
Mark Jones
Tonto Press
2006.


This book, the eleventh and final one in this short series about "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", is explained (in it's authors own words) on the back cover, shown below.

There has been an updated version of the book, as explained on the Website, here . . .

http://www.theburglarsdog.co.uk/

Sadly, the website goes on to explain that the author has also "retired" from updating it, which is a shame, but it has been a very enjoyable experience (even if I didn't always agree with what was written) reading the book and the website - so many thanks for that!






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Old November 13th, 2010, 10:49 AM   #116
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Bainbridge: Our fallen Heroes
Ian Johnson
Publisher unknown
2010.

Bainbridge's employees killed in Great War
remembered in new book

November 13th 2010, by Ruth Lawson, The Journal



FALLEN heroes from a historic Newcastle Department Store have been honoured in a new book.

John Lewis employee Ian Johnson traced the history of former workers of the store, formerly known as Bainbridge’s, who fought in World War One.

The 50-year-old, who has worked as a selling assistant at the store for 33 years, was intrigued by the Bainbridge & Co World War One memorial that stands in the management corridor at the store.

And two years ago he delved into the archives to try and discover more about the 27 men listed on the memorial.

Mr Johnson, from Crawcrook, Gateshead, said: “I started researching just after Armistice Day in 2008 because it got me thinking about the memorial and all the men, and I only finished about two or three months ago.” He added: “When you start researching these kind of things it just seems to unravel lots of things.

“There’s some heartbreaking stories that I’ve heard about men and their families.

“Some of the men were only married a few months then they went off to war.”

Mr Johnson, who is married to Pauline, discovered that the Bainbridge employees fought in most of the major battles of World War One including Ypres, Somme, Arras, Passchendaele and the ferocious German Spring Offensive of 1918. Only one lived long enough to see final victory.

The book, titled Bainbridge, Our Fallen Heroes 1914-1919, reveals moving stories and pictures of the 27 men, who all worked at Bainbridge’s before going to the battle fields serving in the first Pals Battalion raised on Tyneside.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz159d8aGhs

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; July 26th, 2014 at 01:44 PM. Reason: Repaired broken image link
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Old November 13th, 2010, 09:06 PM   #117
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When the idea of the 'Book of the Week' selection was suggested, it was so that this thread was kept alive, as it wasn't getting many posts at that time.

Also, in my own mind, I just felt that there are so MANY great books around, about (primarily) the City of Newcastle, and I thought that this thread would be an ideal way of getting them all eventually reviewed and listed (almost 'catalogued') on here, over a period of time!

People would then (more) know what was available, even if they had to delve into the 2nd hand market to obtain books that could (by now) be out of print.

So, with the 'books of the week', interspersed (often) with reviews of new local books (such as todays Bainbridges book) copied over from local newspapers, the thread appears to have prospered.

I hope people are finding it interesting?

Another direction in which the thread has developed recently, is that the chosen books have been listed in "groups", such as "Pubs" or "Newcastle Old and New" or "Official City Guides", or whatever!

To that end, I know that a lot of members of the forum are interested in the development and history of Public Transport in the region - so I plan on making that, the subject of the next group of books chosen for the 'Book of the Week' postings.

There should be quite a few of those, and if anyone has any to contribute, please do so . . .
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Old November 15th, 2010, 02:25 PM   #118
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 15th November 2010.

40 Years of Buses, in Newcastle upon Tyne
Eric Hutchinson
Venture Publications Ltd
1996.


This book is the first one in a series of books about "Public Transport in the Newcastle Area - Past and Present".

It is interesting that the front cover, as shown below, doesn't actually have the full title of the book on it! That apart, it is a really good book, full of photos and narratives about our local buses over the 40 year period from 1956 until its publication year of 1996. Often, I find, the photos reveal a lot about our city and the buildings of a given era, just from what can be seen in the same photo as the bus that is actually the subject of the photo.

This book takes you from the era of the yellow 'Newcastle Transport' buses (and Trolley Buses) and the green 'Gateshead Transport' buses (along with the red out of town coaches of 'United' and 'Northern') through to the multi colored buses of 'Northumbria Motor Services', which started in 1986, and on to all the other companies that were trading by the end of the period covered in the book.












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Old November 15th, 2010, 09:47 PM   #119
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NH, you might be interested in a couple of old novels written by "Charlton Waine", which are fictionalised histories of tyneside. they're not the most well written or anything, but interesting for historians of the area. one is entitled "breed of the inshore" and the other "down to the sea: a saga of the tyne". the 2nd one follows a shipbuilding family, which is basically an assemblage of the real ship building families along the river, through the 19th century. a particularly riveting passage describes the great fire of newcastle and gateshead.
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Old November 15th, 2010, 11:22 PM   #120
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NH, you might be interested in a couple of old novels written by "Charlton Waine", which are fictionalised histories of tyneside. they're not the most well written or anything, but interesting for historians of the area. one is entitled "breed of the inshore" and the other "down to the sea: a saga of the tyne". the 2nd one follows a shipbuilding family, which is basically an assemblage of the real ship building families along the river, through the 19th century. a particularly riveting passage describes the great fire of newcastle and gateshead.

Thanks Johnny, I have not heard of these books before, but they certainly sound like they might be of interest to me.

I have found one for sale at the Sanctuary Secondhand Bookshop, here . . .

Quote:
Waine, Charlton. Down to the Sea. London: Jarrolds, "A Saga of the Tyne". No date but c 1938. 288 pp fictionalised history of the Tyneside shipyards. Hb black cloth soiled and worn. Author's second book. 8 page publishers catalogue bound in. £18.00
I wonder, do you know if they have them in the City Library?
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