search the site
 daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > North East England > Newcastle Metro Area

Newcastle Metro Area For Newcastle, N Tyneside, Gateshead, S Tyneside, South Northumberland



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 16th, 2010, 04:18 AM   #121
johnnypd
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 6,423
Likes (Received): 1198

i'm not sure - a search online says no. they do have his 3 novels in the national library of scotland though, which is where i read "down to the sea".
johnnypd no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 21st, 2010, 11:51 PM   #122
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

.
'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 22nd November 2010.

Trolley Buses of Newcastle upon Tyne, 1935-1966.
T P Canneaux and N H Hanson
Newcastle upon Tyne City Libraries
1985 (2nd Revised Edition).


This book is the second one in a series of books about "Public Transport in the Newcastle Area - Past and Present".

The book tells the story of one of the largest trolleybus sytems in Great Britain, tracing its origins from the earliest proposals in 1911, to its final demise in 1966.

The Newcastle trolleybus service began in 1935, and nearly 350 trolleybuses ran on the system during its 31 year life.

Sadly, only two survive today.

This book contains a LOT of very detailed narrative, but also some excellent black & white photographs . . .













.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2010, 10:20 PM   #123
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

.
'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 29th November 2010.

Newcastle Trolleybuses.
Stephen Lockwood
Middleton Press
2006.


This book is the third one in a series of books about "Public Transport in the Newcastle Area - Past and Present".

I was completely unaware that I actually owned TWO books on the specific subject of Newcastle Trolleybuses, so between this one and last weeks, that must cover everything there is to know on the subject!

This book is structured, in terms of photos and narratives, to cover each route on the system, which (for me) made it a very enjoyable read.

To quote the books cover . . . "Through these pages, take a ride and visit each route in turn, looking at what Newcastle and its beautiful yellow trolleybuses were like 50 years ago"

That sums it up!












The very bottom photo, shows a trolleybus on "the lost part" of Clayton Street, about to turn right into Blackett Street.

.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 5th, 2010, 05:56 PM   #124
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

.
'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 6th December 2010.

Horse Tram to Metro.
S. A. Staddon
Tyne and Wear Passenger Transport Executive
1978.


This book is the fourth in a series of books about "Public Transport in the Newcastle Area - Past and Present".

This book was published by Tyne and Wear PTE, to officially celebrate 100 Years of Public Transport in Tyne and Wear.

The book cover states . . .

1978 is an important year for local public transport. 100 years ago, in 1878, the first horse tramway system was opened by the 'Newcastle and Gosforth Tramways and Carriage Company Ltd'. In 1978 we will see, in contrast, the very start of test running prior to the opening of Phase One of the Tyne and Wear Metro.

The last 100 years has been a period of great change. This book tells the story of the major transport events of that 100 years . . .










.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; December 6th, 2010 at 09:41 AM.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 13th, 2010, 04:23 PM   #125
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

.
'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 13th December 2010.

Metro - The Opening of the Tyne & Wear Metro by Her Majesty The Queen
Tyne & Wear Passenger Transport Executive
Tyne & Wear County Council
1981.


This book is the fifth in a series of books about "Public Transport in the Newcastle Area - Past and Present".

This book was published by Tyne and Wear County Council in 1981 (one year after the Metro started operating) to commemorate the Official Opening of the system (and of the Metro bridge across the Tyne) by the Queen, on November 6th 1981.

An excellent small book, it contains many factual details about the system.

As with all books about the Metro, from the era if first opened, there are a lot of photos showing the Metro Trains as they originally looked.










.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; July 6th, 2015 at 12:52 AM.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 19th, 2010, 01:21 PM   #126
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

.
'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 20th December 2010.


A slight variation this week, with five books included.

Last weeks book on the "Official Opening of the Metro" got me thinking about all the other smaller books and booklets that I have about the plans for (and the building of) the Metro.

It was such an exciting time, as someone who had lived in London for years and who had found their 'Underground System' to be one of the best things about the place, to arrive back home and find they were about to build one here in Newcastle!!!! Amazing!

So, here are a small selection of five books and booklets from the time, all of which can be found as reference books in the City Library, and probably in other libraries around the area . . .

These five items are the sixth to tenth in a series of books about "Public Transport in the Newcastle Area - Past and Present".


Rapid Transit for Tyneside.
Tyneside Passenger Transport Executive
1971.





Tyneside Rapid Transit.
Dr Tony M Ridley
Tyneside Passenger Transport Executive
1972.





Rapid Transit System.
Tyneside Passenger Transport Executive
1971.





Public transport on Tyneside : A Plan for the People.
Tyneside Passenger Transport Executive
1973.



This booklet included the FIRST METRO MAP . .




Meet Your Metro.
Tyne and Wear County Council
Three Editions - July 1977 / June 1978 / July 1979.

These were published in the late 1970s to show the CONSTRUCTION of the Metro, but all editions were really quite similar . .



.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2010, 11:55 AM   #127
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

.
'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 27th December 2010.

Trams, Trains, Trolleys.
Newcastle City Libraries
City of Newcastle upon Tyne
1985.


This book is the eleventh in a series of books about "Public Transport in the Newcastle Area - Past and Present".

This book is the third in the Newcastle City Libraries 'Gone but not Forgotten' series. It is a small, but excellent, 'book of photographs' covering all forms of transport in Newcastle over the period 1900 to 1958.



The cover of the book shows Neville Street, during the severe winter of 1947 which (prior to 1963) was the worst on record.







.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 2nd, 2011, 01:40 PM   #128
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

Tyneside's gangland culture unmasked in new book
January 2nd 2011, by Dan Warburton, Sunday Sun



SAVAGE beatings, torture and shootings . . . life in Tyneside's gangland underworld is to be laid bare. Bernard O’Mahanoey, an ex-member of the infamous Essex Boys, has documented the murky world of Newcastle’s criminal fraternity.

In a new book, the author looks at the unsolved murder of Viv Graham and makes claims about the fierce feud between two notorious West End families, the Sayers and the Conroys.

It comes just weeks after sensational claims were made during a jury nobbling trial that Paddy Conroy had plotted to put his rival John Henry Sayers back behind bars. Now Bernard, 50, from Birmingham, has penned a book that delves into the Newcastle underworld and analyses what sparked the bitter feud.

Last night he said: “The book is about what’s happened since the 80s. It’s not written in favour of anyone, it’s just a look at crime in the past two or three decades.

Among the tales documented in the novel, Fog on the Tyne, is the execution of Tyneside doorman Viv Graham, who was gunned down on New Year’s Eve in 1993. Viv was shot dead in Wallsend High Street after leaving the Queen’s Head pub.

More than 1,000 people were interviewed over the murder of the 34-year-old, 500 homes were visited and hundreds of statements taken, but Viv Graham’s killers are still at large. Even an apparent confession from killer and supergrass Lee Shaun Watson during a separate court case came to nothing.

But detectives say that the file on the gangland killing remains open, and they still hope to catch his killer.

Bernard said: “I heard a lot of sinister things while I was researching this book.”

Fog on the Tyne is due to be published in May this year.


Read More - http://www.sundaysun.co.uk/news/nort...9310-27919076/

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; July 2nd, 2015 at 02:52 AM.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 9th, 2011, 05:10 PM   #129
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

.
'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 10th January 2011.

An Album of Tyne & Wear PTE Buses.
John Burnett and Geoff Coxon
Pennine Publications Ltd
1983.


This book is the twelfth in a series of books about "Public Transport in the Newcastle Area - Past and Present".

This book illustrates and describes most types of "PTE" buses, from the period 1969 to 1983 (date of publication). The Tyneside Passenger Transport Executive came into being on 1st October 1969 and began operating the Municipal bus fleets of Newcastle ('Newcastle Transport') and South Shields, some three months later.

They became Tyne and Wear PTE in 1974, the Sunderland Corporation bus fleet having been taken over in 1973.





These 'Atlanteans' were the big replacements (they certainly 'seemed' very big) in the 1960s, for the old open-ended (where you could just hop on and off) buses and trolley buses that had always been around before then . . .



These buses, identifiable by the 'lower-down' window on the passenger side at the front, were the BEST buses I had ever been on, when they were introduced in the late 1970s. They were SO smooth and quiet, and had great acceleration - which I liked!


.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2011, 04:13 PM   #130
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

Vicar compiles book on Burradon Pit Disaster
January 11th 2011, by Sarah Scott, Evening Chronicle



THE stories of a community steeped in mining history have been captured in a new book.

Tales of miners from Burradon and Camperdown, North Tyneside, have been collected together in “A Rich Seam” Uncovered, compiled by the Reverend Angela Maughan, Vicar of Weetslade Parish.

Through a series of interviews with surviving former miners and their relatives she has written a book which celebrates their legacy.

She said: “The book was made to bring the community together and resurrect stories that have been lost.

“Some of the people I interviewed were moved to tears at having their stories told and said they had always wanted it so their grandchildren could read about them.”

The idea for the book came about after the 150th Commemoration of the Disaster in Burradon Pit, in March 2010.

The explosion killed 76 men and boys including those as young as 10.


Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...#ixzz1Ajw9WgTY
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 17th, 2011, 10:25 AM   #131
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

Book relives prisoner’s great escape
by James Moore, The Journal, January 17th 2011


It was a daring escape that left one man dead and ended with a savage beating, and now Austrian Josef Kirchdorfer has re-lived his escape from a North East prisoner of war camp, by penning his memoirs.

The 85-year-old and seven others plotted their escape from Camp 18 at Featherstone, near Haltwhistle, Northumberland, for months.

After fashioning new outfits and making wire cutters using a window latch they fled the camp during a thunderstorm, intent on stealing a plane and flying back to Germany.

After the group split into two, one party tried to cross the flooded River South Tyne where one man suffered a heart attack and died. After a day on the run and making it 12 miles into Cumbria, the men were captured by a local policeman.

On his return to the camp Josef, a former Luftwaffe pilot, was then beaten and humiliated by British guards.

He has now penned a book about his time entitled ‘WW2 memories of a youngster’. Josef, who now lives in Luzern, in Switzerland, said: “I was determined to escape, don’t ask me why.

“Now it seems hardly understandable, even to me. Most of my fellow prisoners were glad to have survived and felt no desire to risk their lives by attempting an escape, but at the time I was convinced I had to escape. Not because I wanted to be a hero, but because I was young, full of the urge for action and because I had no desire at all to stay in England or its dominions for years.”


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1BHb64JT0
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 18th, 2011, 10:12 AM   #132
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

.
'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 17th January 2011.

Remember The Trams : Newcastle upon Tyne.
George S Hearse
Europa, Isle of Man
1978.


This book is the thirteenth in a series of books about "Public Transport in the Newcastle Area - Past and Present".

This book illustrates and describes the Trams of Newcastle from the earliest days.

The introduction explains that, one Hundred years ago (when this book was published) under the powers conferred on them by 'The Newcastle upon Tyne Tramways Improvement Act 1877', the City of Newcastle upon Tyne was authorised to construct a system of tramways to the standard gauge. Then, by an act of 1899, Newcastle obtained powers to 'electrify' the trams. The last Horse Tram ran on 13th April 1901.

The book continues the story of the Newcastle Trams, with narrative and some excellent photos, right up until the 1930s, when most tram routes changed their services to Motor Buses or Trolley Buses. The war actually delayed full conversion until as late as 4th August 1951, but after that date there were no more trams in Newcastle.










.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 21st, 2011, 07:16 PM   #133
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,723
Likes (Received): 3817

30% Off Local History Books

Heads up to anyone after a bargain - the Market Street Tourist Information Centre (Central Arcade) has quite a few local history books with 30% off. (Disclaimer : I don't work for NCC)
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 23rd, 2011, 08:44 AM   #134
neeorg
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1
Likes (Received): 0

I'll second that about the Central Arcade tourist centre, they do have quite a few books that are really interesting.

I love seeing the images of buses going down Northumberland Street, I saw a few images on Flickr where Newcastle city council have added a selection of their archives.
neeorg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2011, 02:30 PM   #135
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

New book of photos shows old stairs a step back in time
by Sonia Sharma, Evening Chronicle, January 24th 2011

A TYNESIDE author has stepped back in time to reveal the fascinating history of a town.

Jack Shotton spent months researching the old flights of stairs in North Shields which date back to the 1700s.



The town was once concentrated on a low plain, while the top of the bank consisted of farmland.

But as the area expanded and the farmland transformed, stairways were constructed as a link between homes, workplaces and pubs.

Often the steps were named after pubs or other businesses at the bottom, such as Post Office Stairs, Library Stairs or Pipe Maker’s Stairs. Some were named after individuals like Stewart’s Bank and Fenwick’s Bank.



In his new book, Mr Shotton, 80, of Tynemouth, has included historic pictures, as well as paintings he made of more than 30 of the stairways. He has also shed light on the lifestyle of people who lived near the steps.

North Shields - Stepping Back in Time, published by Summerhill Books and priced at £9.99, is on sale at North Tyneside Libraries, Harry Smith’s and Keel Row Book Shops in North Shields, and Fenwick and Robinson’s in Newcastle.


Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...#ixzz1BxWIoy00
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2011, 02:47 PM   #136
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

.
'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 24th January 2011.

Newcastle 900 - Railways.
Stuart Rankin and Michael Woods
British Rail Eastern Region
1980.


This book is the fourteenth in a series of books about "Public Transport in the Newcastle Area - Past and Present".

It was one of a number of books published in "Newcastle 900 Year", 1980 . . . the BEST year ever for those of us with an interest in Newcastle and in collecting new books and other souvenirs about the place!

An interesting small book about "the cradle of railways", as it describes Tyneside in its opening chapter.









.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 27th, 2011, 05:25 PM   #137
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

United fanatic's book charts 50-year story
by Joanne Butcher, Evening Chronicle, January 27th 2011



A LIFELONG Magpies fan who counts John Anderson and Bob Moncur among his closest pals has written a book on his love affair with the Toon.

Billy Costine, from Ireland, has followed Newcastle United for 50 years.

And he spent a decade working as a scout for the next generation of black-and-white talent.

Billy began supporting Newcastle in 1961, as an eight-year-old boy gathered around a Subbuteo set with his brothers in Waterford City.

Now, Billy has turned his incredible story of a life dedicated to the black-and-white army into a new book, The Flight of a Magpie, which is due to be published in May.


Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...#ixzz1CFm0Hd2U

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; July 2nd, 2015 at 02:46 AM.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2011, 02:39 PM   #138
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

.
'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 31st January 2011.

The High Level Bridge and Newcastle Central Station.
John Addyman and Bill Fawcett
North Eastern Railway Association
1999.


This book is the fifteenth in a series of books on this thread about "Public Transport in the Newcastle Area - Past and Present".

I had to choose THIS book for this weeks review as part of our 'Transport' series, as it has proved so useful over the last few days, on the Questions thread, and on the General Knowlege thread.

So much so, that I do not need to say much more about this book here, that has not been already said by the recent posts on the two mentioned threads.

In my view, a fabulous book, and well worth trying to get hold of a copy of if you can! I was spoilt for choice for pages to show below, and (it has to be said) the 'narrative' pages are equally as compelling and revealing as the photo pages, its just that the photo/illustration pages show best in a review like this . . .









.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2011, 06:29 PM   #139
Ponteland Historian
Ponteland historian
 
Ponteland Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 8
Likes (Received): 0

Central Station

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
ferret88 . . .

For information, a Review of that book The High Level Bridge and Newcastle Central Station, that you refer to above, is now on the BOOKS thread . .

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=138

Hope you find yourself a copy!
Try the North East Railway Association Website
http://www.ner.org.uk/
Its packed with information
Ponteland Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 30th, 2011, 02:49 PM   #140
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,723
Likes (Received): 3817

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponteland Historian View Post
Try the North East Railway Association Website
http://www.ner.org.uk/
Its packed with information
Oddly enough I saw a copy of the paper backed version on sale at WATETRSTONES within HMV at Silverlink Business Park this morning - £12.99, so its still available despite it appearing to be out of print.
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
book, books, culture, education, england, historic newcastle, historic north east eng, history, library, local history, newcastle, newcastle photos, newcastle upon tyne, study, united kingdom

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu