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Old November 17th, 2012, 03:33 PM   #121
Squipper
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So that's parks, pools and library's the council are looking at the community to run. Of course once they do that they will never go back to employing people to do it!

What's next? I think the community would probably do a better job running the council itself.
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Old December 4th, 2012, 01:37 AM   #122
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[IMG]http://i47.************/oj3668.png[/IMG]

Wed 5 Dec 2012 - Sun 9 Dec 2012

Enchanted Parks is a ticketed event. Tickets cost £6 adults and children under 16 are FREE

http://www.newcastlegateshead.com/wi...s/book-tickets

You will also be able to buy tickets in person at Gateshead Central Library (Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri 9am – 7pm, Weds 9am – 5pm and Sat 9am – 1pm) and St Mary’s Heritage Centre (Tues – Sun 10am – 4pm) or by calling 0191 433 6965 (Mon – Thurs, 8am – 5.30pm, Fri 8am - 5pm ).
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Old December 4th, 2012, 01:44 AM   #123
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Lord Armstrong’s Vision Destroyed In Jesmond Dene Landslide

A 75-metre landslide in Jesmond Dene has blocked four footpaths to a waterfall that was part of Newcastle industrialist Lord Armstrong's vision for the park.
The engineer, who founded the Armstrong Whitworth manufacturing empire, helped design a waterfall by blasting huge chunks of rocks with dynamite in the Dene in the 1860s.
Ouseburn Parks Ranger Michael Hancock said: "It is a real shame people can’t see the view now because we have had to close the paths.
"The waterfall is very well known and one of the most photographed in the region."
It is not known whether the paths will be reopened because of the cost to repair the damage.
It is estimated it may cost hundreds of thousands, if not a million pounds to repair the landslide.


http://tyneandwear.sky.com/news/article/48927
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Old December 4th, 2012, 06:13 PM   #124
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Double awards for Jesmond Dene

From the Newcastle City Council web site @ http://www.newcastle.gov.uk/news-sto...s-jesmond-dene

Double awards for Jesmond Dene
Published date:
Tue, 04/12/2012 - 10:30

One of Newcastle most loved beauty spots has been recognised with two major awards.

Jesmond Dene which forms part of Ouseburn Parks received a Highly Commended in the Heritage and Conservation Award category at the Landscape Institute Awards at a ceremony in London last month.

The restoration of Ouseburn Parks, which is made up of four linked parks covering a two mile stretch of the city’s Ouseburn was designed by Southern Green Ltd and received praise from the judges.

The award celebrated the diverse range of works in the park which included the conservation and restoration of the historic landscape, structures, features and views; the improvement of paths and physical access within and between the parks, as well as new plantings and other soft landscape features to open up many lost views.

Judges said the approach adopted for the restoration of this landscape is spare and classical, skilfully adopting a ‘less is more’ philosophy in delivering a large and complex scheme.

Jesmond Dene has also been named the best Hidden Gem Beauty spot in the North after being voted by members of the public following a campaign by Northern Rail to highlight places of interest across the North of England.

The park will feature in Northern Rail’s poster campaign to highlight all the hidden gems and will appear in 70 railway stations across the Northern Rail Network.

There will also be leaflets providing information about each of the winners including Jesmond Dene available in train stations across the rail network.

Anthony McKenna, Newcastle City Council’s Head of Leisure Services, said: “We are thrilled that Ouseburn Parks have been recognised by these awards and I am also delighted that Jesmond Dene has been named as a Hidden Gem by the passengers of Northern Rail. The parks are a real asset to our city and I’m sure they will continue to be enjoyed by this and future generations.”
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Old December 5th, 2012, 03:01 PM   #125
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squipper View Post
Lord Armstrong’s Vision Destroyed In Jesmond Dene Landslide

A 75-metre landslide in Jesmond Dene has blocked four footpaths to a waterfall that was part of Newcastle industrialist Lord Armstrong's vision for the park.
The engineer, who founded the Armstrong Whitworth manufacturing empire, helped design a waterfall by blasting huge chunks of rocks with dynamite in the Dene in the 1860s... It is not known whether the paths will be reopened because of the cost to repair the damage.
It is estimated it may cost hundreds of thousands, if not a million pounds to repair the landslide.
http://tyneandwear.sky.com/news/article/48927
Surely a bit more dynamite should do the trick..?
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Old December 9th, 2012, 12:20 PM   #126
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Jesmond Dene landside repairs may take months due to cuts
By Kate Proctor, Sunday Sun, December 9th 2012

....

A LANDSLIDE which has devastated part of a landmark Newcastle park may take months to put right, it was claimed last night. A 75 metre section of embankment at Jesmond Dene, Newcastle, has given way, taking out four footpaths designed by engineer Lord William Armstrong in the 1860s. As geologists arrived on site to check if the land near the water mill is still moving ahead of this week’s expected snowfall, conservationists and councilors fear funding for repairs from Newcastle City Council could be hard to find.

Lillian Lovelock, a member of the Friends of Jesmond Dene conservation society, said: “With all this wet weather it’s obviously had some sort of influence; it’s been a substantial landslip and parts are completely blocked off – £1m sounds about right. It will be a considerable amount of money to correct it, if it’s even possible. The fact that so much money has been spent on the dene recently with the Lottery Funding, it’s a great disappointment. We managed to sort out one problem and now there’s another.”

The park was originally the garden of arms manufacturer Lord Armstrong’s house and he bequeathed it to the city in 1879. In the last 10 years it has had £6m spent on it, including a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to improve paths, bridges and Pets Corner.


Read More - http://www.sundaysun.co.uk/news/nort...9310-32390379/
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Old December 11th, 2012, 10:28 AM   #127
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Bedlington' Gallagher Park proving its
popularity in top contest.

by David Black, The Journal, December 11th 2012


PEOPLE WHO USE a much-valued park in one of Northumberland’s biggest towns have helped it win a national popularity contest for green open spaces. Gallagher Park in Bedlington has scooped the Most Loved Field award – which brings with it a trophy and a £500 cash prize. The accolade was handed out in a ceremony at the famous Lords cricket ground – and came after local residents who regularly use the park voted for it in an online poll.

Yesterday there was a double celebration at Gallagher Park, after it was also awarded a £25,000 grant from the Sita Trust’s QEII Fields Fund to pay for improvements to its facilities. A successful bid for the funding was made by the Bedlingtonshire Development Trust, the county council and the Friends of Gallagher Park group. The money will be used to develop mountain bike trails, and provide new furniture, including picnic tables, seats and litter bins, to enhance family visits.

The Most Loved Field competition was run by Fields in Trust, which believes that parks, sports grounds, play areas, bicycle trails and nature reserves should be at the heart of local communities.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz2EjYtejP8
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Old January 7th, 2013, 10:17 AM   #128
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I walked through Leazes Park yesterday and while the side closest to the RVI looks great and well used as you walk through to the other half that faces on to Stanhope Street it's shockingly bad. I know it's January and the light was unforgiving but that really is a big waste of land. I think that it may be worth while recording what is going to happen to these big open spaces when the all the park keepers are made redundant.
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Old January 8th, 2013, 04:43 PM   #129
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The Story of Northumberland Park: North Shields, Spital Dene and The Pow Burn
Mike N Coates
Summerhill Books
2013




New Book reveals more than 125
years of Northumberland Park

by Sonia Sharma, Evening Chronicle, January 8th 2013


Michael Coates and old pictures of Northumberland Park (inset)

THESE treasured pictures chart the history of a Tyneside park that has been at the heart of a community for more than 125 years. Now the site is the focus of a major regeneration project, with the help of a Heritage Lottery Fund grant of £2.2m. And Michael Coates, chairman of The New Friends of Northumberland Park, has produced a book documenting the area’s past.

The Story of Northumberland Park includes more than 140 pictures, historical information, maps and details of an archaeological investigation of the St Leonards medieval hospital. Mr Coates, 64, of Whitley Bay, said: “When I was a child, we used to live just across the road from the park and I have fond memories of playing there. In those days there were no computers or video games, so we used to play outside all day. It was a popular place."

“Over the years, I started collecting pictures and information about the area, starting off with natural history. For example, I identified 65 species of trees there as well as varieties of birds and butterflies. I also began to look at the history of the surrounding areas, including Tanners Bank and the riverside. As the park is now undergoing regeneration, there is a lot more interest in the site and I thought it was time to put all my notes and information into a book.”

The book, priced £8.50, is available at North Tyneside libraries, local bookshops and online at www.summerhillbooks.co.uk


Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...#ixzz2HOmHoeZt

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Old January 13th, 2013, 10:47 AM   #130
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Rabbie set for a return as part of Walker Park makeover
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, January 12th 2013


THE POET Robert Burns is set for a comeback as part of the £1.8m makeover for an 'inner-city' park. Walker Park in Newcastle, which was opened in 1891, has been awarded the cash by the Heritage Lottery Fund. Among projects lined up to improve the park is the restoration and return of a statue of Burns.

It was originally put up in the park in 1901 by the Tyneside Burns Club, most of whose members were Scots who had moved to the Walker area to work in the local shipyards and other heavy industries. The statue was erected to commemorate the visit by Burns to Newcastle in 1787.

By the mid-1970s, the statue was suffering from vandalism. It was repaired and moved to Heaton Park, only to suffer further damage, ending with the cast-iron figure being broken into pieces. It was then taken away into storage at a council depot.

The park is home to a war memorial to the 5th Northumberland Fusiliers and a Winged Victory memorial opposite the park in Scrogg Road. Along with the Robert Burns statue, they form the largest concentration of monuments in Newcastle outside the City Centre.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz2HqZvOsGs
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Old January 13th, 2013, 02:21 PM   #131
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How long do we give it until someone smashes it up again?
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Old January 13th, 2013, 04:09 PM   #132
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Robert Chambers Grave and Memorial

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
Rabbie set for a return as part of Walker Park makeover
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, January 12th 2013


THE POET Robert Burns is set for a comeback as part of the £1.8m makeover for an 'inner-city' park. Walker Park in Newcastle, which was opened in 1891, has been awarded the cash by the Heritage Lottery Fund. Among projects lined up to improve the park is the restoration and return of a statue of Burns.

It was originally put up in the park in 1901 by the Tyneside Burns Club, most of whose members were Scots who had moved to the Walker area to work in the local shipyards and other heavy industries. The statue was erected to commemorate the visit by Burns to Newcastle in 1787.

By the mid-1970s, the statue was suffering from vandalism. It was repaired and moved to Heaton Park, only to suffer further damage, ending with the cast-iron figure being broken into pieces. It was then taken away into storage at a council depot.

The park is home to a war memorial to the 5th Northumberland Fusiliers and a Winged Victory memorial opposite the park in Scrogg Road. Along with the Robert Burns statue, they form the largest concentration of monuments in Newcastle outside the City Centre.
In the adjacent Christ Church Churchyard, Walker the grave and memorial to the Tyneside rower Robert Chambers was left for many years in a decapitated state.














Photographs hosted on http://ellwood.fototime.com/Walker/R...%20and%20Grave
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Old January 13th, 2013, 04:56 PM   #133
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Any fans of Northumberland Park in North Shields, this fine park which is half a mile long and has been around since 1885 is well worth a visit as it has a nice bowling green, a fine duck pond and trails along the edges? I was born opposite the park in Park Terrace and it has a lot of meaning to me.
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Old January 13th, 2013, 05:40 PM   #134
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aylett 67 View Post
Any fans of Northumberland Park in North Shields, this fine park which is half a mile long and has been around since 1885 is well worth a visit as it has a nice bowling green, a fine duck pond and trails along the edges? I was born opposite the park in Park Terrace and it has a lot of meaning to me.

There was a good post about a new book about Northumberland Park, earlier this week, over on the BOOKS Thread . . .

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=660

There is a copy of that post, also, at 'Post 129' of this thread.
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Old January 13th, 2013, 05:59 PM   #135
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Park Terrace is a very fine street it must have been great growing up there.
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Old January 17th, 2013, 05:42 PM   #136
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aylett 67 View Post
Any fans of Northumberland Park in North Shields, this fine park which is half a mile long and has been around since 1885 is well worth a visit as it has a nice bowling green, a fine duck pond and trails along the edges? I was born opposite the park in Park Terrace and it has a lot of meaning to me.
This might interest you - from the North Tyneside Council web site @ http://www.northtyneside.gov.uk/brow...ectCategory=23

Grant will help medieval garden grow

17-JAN-13

Issued by: Duncan Bennett


A medieval garden is set to be created in a popular Victorian Park on North Tyneside thanks to funding from SITA Trust.

The garden will be based in Northumberland Park, which lies between Tynemouth and North Shields, and will recreate one that could have existed on the site as part of the medieval hospital of St Leonard's.

North Tyneside Council, in partnership with the New Friends of Northumberland Park, has been awarded a £41,476 grant for the scheme by environmental funder SITA Trust.

And, although a standalone project, it will compliment the wider restoration of the park, which is backed by a £2.2million grant from Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF).

North Tyneside Elected Mayor Linda Arkley said: "This is another piece in the jigsaw towards bringing Northumberland Park back to its former glory.

"The medieval garden should be a very special visitor attraction - the only one of its kind in the borough.

"We're delighted to receive this grant and look forward to working with the New Friends of Northumberland Park to make the medieval garden a reality."

The New Friends of Northumberland Park have previously received £2,387 from the Community Investment Fund, which is also being used towards the medieval garden project.

The chairman of the New Friends of Northumberland Park, Mike Coates, said: "Our group is delighted to have the opportunity to assist North Tyneside Council in the creation of this medieval garden.

"Following the hugely successful archaeological investigation of St Leonard's and the proposal to recreate a medieval herb garden, our members researched the medieval use of medicinal herbs to ensure the garden will be an authentic historical representation."

SITA Trust provides funding through the Landfill Communities Fund (LCF). Funding is available for projects that enhance communities and enrich nature. Through the LCF over £1 billion has been invested in UK projects to date.

Jools Granville, of SITA Trust, said: "Our capital funding is targeted to provide and enhance community leisure facilities for the widest number of people, as such we are delighted to be able to support the ongoing transformation of Northumberland Park for the communities of Tynemouth and North Shields."

Archaeological digs have previously taken place to rediscover the hospital site and further excavations are due in May 2013.

The medieval garden will measure 25 metres by 12 metres and will be enclosed with wattle fencing

There will be a working garden area with raised beds for medicinal plants. An adjoining area will be filled with roses, honeysuckle, lavender and other fragrant plants to provide a restful haven of tranquillity.

Much of the planting also aims to encourage birds, bees and butterflies.

The two sections will be separated by oak trellising and a rose arch, covered with aromatic climbing plants.

There will be camomile seats and lawns with a central stone ornament.

Some of the pathways will be edged with recreated medieval tiles which will be made by volunteers with advice and guidance from a specialist archaeologist.

Visitors will be encouraged to take ownership of the area by helping the New Friends Garden Club with its upkeep and maintenance.

Work will begin in early January 2013 and is due for completion in Easter 2013, with a celebration picnic earmarked for June 2013. The overall restoration of the park is underway and due for completion in late 2015.

ENDS

Notes to editors:

Northumberland Park opened in 1885 and is comprised of woodland areas, formal flowerbeds, pond, two bowling greens and a playsite.

Unfortunately, many of its historic features have been lost, however it does contain other interesting and unique features including a pet cemetery and the medieval remains of St Leonard's Hospital.

The council wants to ensure they are better protected, preserved and interpreted.

The broad aims of Northumberland Park's restoration are:

- Restore lost features including cast iron railings, bandstand, historic planting schemes, fountains and park furniture
- Provide essential new visitor facilities to support the park's long-term future, which will include a café, toilets, community room and terrace within the formal gardens.
- Improve management and maintenance regimes
- Improve both physical and intellectual access to the park and its unique history

SITA Trust

SITA Trust is an independent funding body set up in 1997 to provide funding through the Landfill Communities Fund. To date SITA Trust has supported more than 3000 projects to a combined value of over £92 million.

Enhancing Communities - SITA Trust funding enhances communities in England, Scotland and Wales by supporting community driven projects to improve vital public recreation facilities such as village halls, community centres, sport, heritage, green spaces and play areas.

Enriching Nature - SITA Trust funding enriches nature by supporting biodiversity conservation projects in England and Wales

For information on how to apply for funding from SITA Trust call (01454) 262910 or visit www.sitatrust.org.uk

Landfill Tax and the Landfill Communities Fund
SITA Trust receives its funding through HM Government's Landfill Communities Fund. Funding is donated by SITA UK, one of the nation's largest recycling and resource management companies.

Any rubbish that is thrown away and cannot be reused ends up in a landfill site. Operators of landfill sites collect tax on each tonne of landfill for HM Treasury. The purpose of this tax is to make it more expensive to put waste into landfill, in turn encouraging us to reduce our waste and recycle more.

A small proportion of this tax can be used to support a wide range of environmental projects near landfill sites, through the Landfill Communities Fund (LCF). Through the LCF over £1 billion has been invested in UK projects. SITA Trust is part of the LCF, which is regulated on behalf of HM Government's Revenue & Customs by ENTRUST. For further information, please visit www.entrust.org.uk.
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Old January 21st, 2013, 09:47 PM   #137
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Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
There was a good post about a new book about Northumberland Park, earlier this week, over on the BOOKS Thread . . .

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=660

There is a copy of that post, also, at 'Post 129' of this thread.
Thankyou, it is a popular park and well liked.
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Old January 23rd, 2013, 06:28 PM   #138
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Newcastle Council talks of £7.5 million cuts over 3 years on "Decent Neighbourhoods" department funding

This scanned copy of Newcastle Evening Chronicle article of 23/01/13 concerning possible funding cuts that could affect the city's green spaces



KEN
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Old January 25th, 2013, 11:12 AM   #139
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Is it really true that there are only 10 park keepers for all the parks?
Whats with the daily inspection of playground? Is there a play ground inspectorate?
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Old February 13th, 2013, 04:43 PM   #140
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Appeal for old photos of Wallsend park and fountain
by Sonia Sharma, Evening Chronicle, February 13th 2013


North Tyneside Council wants to reinstate the Duffy Memorial Fountain

MEMORIES of a long-lost fountain are needed by town hall planners who want to rebuild it. North Tyneside Council is carrying out regeneration work at Wallsend Parks and wants to reinstate the Duffy Memorial Fountain as part of the programme. The fountain, unveiled in 1912, was in memory of community leader Joseph Duffy who, in 1884, opened a brick works near the Carville schools, in Wallsend and built a considerable part of the old Buddle ward. He also once owned the Wallsend Borough Theatre.

In 1901, when the town officially became a borough, he was elected to the new council and became mayor in 1909 and died in office the following year. The fountain was designed by local architects Benjamin F Simpson and Sidney H Lawson, and built by Emley and Sons. It was previously situated in Richardson Dees Park, but was removed and its pieces were later found in Burns Close, Wallsend.

Now, with the help of historic pictures and old measurements, a rebuild of the structure has been commissioned, but help is still needed to restore the monument’s finer details as the water bowl and a supposed cherub feature are unclear. The council is appealing for old photos of the fountain in which the features may be more visible.


Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...#ixzz2KnIPBe1P

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Last edited by Newcastle Historian; August 19th, 2014 at 01:21 PM. Reason: Repaired broken image link
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