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Old March 20th, 2014, 04:52 PM   #861
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Hitachi moving headquarters of lucrative rail business to Britain in pre-emptive bid to build trains for HS2 line

http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/m...n-HS2-bid.html

This is Money - 20th march 2014 - by RAY MASSEY, TRANSPORT EDITOR

Japanese giant Hitachi is to move the headquarters of its lucrative rail business to Britain in what is seen as a pre-emptive bid to build the 180mph trains for the Government’s controversial £50billion HS2 line. Its corporate headquarters will switch from Tokyo to London – with a British executive rather than a Japanese national as global boss - in what minsters hailed today as 'an incredible vote of confidence' in the UK. Hitachi Rail was previously at the centre of a furious 'British jobs for British workers' row when it clinched a major rail contract for intercity trains ahead of UK-based but Canadian-owned rival Bombardier in Derby.

Hitachi Rail was worth just under £1billion in 2012 before it won the £1.2bn order to build the intercity trains last year. Moving its corporate headquarters to Britain – closer to its factory at Newton Aycliffe in County Durham which is currently being constructed - is seen as a way of defusing such criticism when, as expected, it bids for the £7billion contact to build trains for the controversial £50billion HS2 line from London to Manchester and the North. Earlier this year Hitachi Rail Europe said their factory in Newton Aycliffe will act as their European hub for train manufacturing and exports.

A Hitachi Rail source said: 'This scotches once and all any criticism Hitachi Rail is not British enough. The trains parts are made in Britain, using parts sourced across the UK, the staff are British and now the headquarters of the entire global company is based in Britain – that’s a lot more British than a Canadian firm with its headquarters based in Germany.' Hitachi Rail Global is growing from a business employing 2,500 people today to 4,000 people in the next two and a half years. Turnover is £1.67bn today with the aim of growing to £2.5bn in the next few years. The relocated firm will be headed by Alistair Dormer, currently executive chairman of Hitachi Rail Europe, who will take over as Global CEO of the rail systems business.

Mr Dormer said: 'Today’s announcement is a significant sign of intent by Hitachi to grow its business in the rail market and I am excited by the level of trust placed in me to lead our growing business in this next phase of expansion.' He said: 'Both the UK and Japan remain important as markets for Hitachi Rail, and with our train factory in the North East of England now under construction, we will work to realise our export potential from the UK, expanding into Europe and emergent markets.'

He added: 'We will continue to deliver excellent service to our customer base whilst seeking new markets and opportunities for expansion.' Hitachi Rail said: 'The management team will boost the growth of the business in the UK and Europe and will oversee the rapid capability expansion through establishing a manufacturing base in the UK and nationwide maintenance facilities to support the Class 800 series trains and anticipated new orders.' Hitachi Rail Europe is currently contracted to provide new rolling stock for the £5.8billion Intercity Express Programme (ICE). The Department for Transport (DfT) is procuring them to replace the Intercity 125 and 225 fleets on the East Coast and Great Western Main Lines with electric and 'bi-mode' trains.

Transport secretary Patrick McLoughlin said: 'This is an incredible vote of confidence in a growing Britain that is exporting more and making great things once again. 'Nothing says that better than the company that built the first bullet train putting its HQ here to sell abroad, alongside a new factory and new jobs in northern England. 'This is just the sort of growth we want to see more of as we invest in rail and build HS2.'

Business Secretary Vince Cable said: 'This move demonstrates a huge vote of confidence in Britain, its workers and its rail industry from one of Japan’s biggest businesses. It follows the company's announcement last year of 750 new jobs at their factory in Newton Aycliffe. 'It’s further testament to the Government’s industrial strategy which is giving companies of Hitachi's stature the confidence to invest in the UK, creating new jobs and increasing exports that will help sustain long-term economic growth.'

One Hitachi insider said: 'This is an unprecedented move for the Japanese conglomerate, as it will see all decisions about the global development of the rail business being made in the UK. It highlights the faith the company's leaders have in the skills and experience of the UK management team.'

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Old March 20th, 2014, 05:16 PM   #862
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Interesting about the possible designs on the HS2 line. It is already known that Hitachi Rail is planning on bidding on ScotRail contracts as well as in Merseyside. There is also talk of bidding on a DB contract (S-Bahn stock?), though I reckon the chances of winning that would be slim or none, and slim has left the building...
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Old March 20th, 2014, 06:40 PM   #863
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There is also talk of bidding on a DB contract (S-Bahn stock?), though I reckon the chances of winning that would be slim or none, and slim has left the building...
Not quite. Polish Pesa won a 470 EMU/DMU trainsests order from DB, therfore, I see no reason why Hitachi couldn't win a order from DB...
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Old March 20th, 2014, 11:58 PM   #864
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DB buys whatever suits their demands best. If Siemens or Bombardier offer the best proposition the order goes to them, but in the past plenty of orders have gone to Alstom and more recently also to CAF and Pesa.

It's a smart move of Hitachi to move their rail business to London. I am curious to see if this means that they will start to participate in EU wide tenders and if they do, if they can keep up their quality standards.
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Old March 21st, 2014, 01:03 PM   #865
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexNL View Post
DB buys whatever suits their demands best. If Siemens or Bombardier offer the best proposition the order goes to them, but in the past plenty of orders have gone to Alstom and more recently also to CAF and Pesa.

It's a smart move of Hitachi to move their rail business to London. I am curious to see if this means that they will start to participate in EU wide tenders and if they do, if they can keep up their quality standards.
Japanese (Hitachi) built trains have the best on-time and reliability records, haven´t they? The issue here might be the succesful lobbying and tendering. Implementation of european technical standards would the easier part.

It would be nice to see Japanese trains on European rails.
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Old March 21st, 2014, 02:04 PM   #866
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Quote:
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It would be nice to see Japanese trains on European rails.
Come to Kent, in England then! The class 395 (Javelin) trains were built in Japan by Hitachi.
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Old March 22nd, 2014, 07:34 PM   #867
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Come to Kent, in England then! The class 395 (Javelin) trains were built in Japan by Hitachi.
Yes, pictures from 2007 here. http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/s...n-britain.html

and the last in 2009 ?

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Old March 22nd, 2014, 09:17 PM   #868
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Could the HS2 rail link revive Birmingham’s property market?

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/cfd4f96a-a...#axzz2wihrQSgE

The Financial Time - 22th march 2014 - by Graham Norwood

Birmingham’s housing market recovery may be lagging behind many other parts of the country but the city’s estate agents are pinning their hopes for a renaissance on one specific infrastructure improvement – the HS2 rail project.

The project is still in its early stages and is vulnerable to a change in political sentiment. However, should it go ahead, from 2026, Birmingham would be the first stop – and for some years, the only stop – on northbound HS2 services from London, and the current 85-minute train journey would be slashed to 50 minutes.

The £50bn line could eventually run to Manchester, Sheffield and Leeds, too, but many claim Birmingham is already the biggest winner, 12 years before the first train is due to arrive. The rail service operator, HS2 Ltd, is holding seminars in the city this spring asking residential and commercial builders how the project can “raise awareness and understanding of the development opportunities and maximise local benefits”.
Some estate agents believe that the two-and-a-half hour car journey from central Birmingham to central London deters people from living in the West Midlands city, while the prospect of a mere 50 minutes on a train may reverse that trend.

“HS2 is already having a positive effect. The Hive development [of low-cost flats] is located very close to the anticipated terminal and has been the best-selling new-build scheme in the city over the last two years,” says Mark Evans of Knight Frank. His hope is that HS2 would revive Birmingham and especially its city centre as a place to live. At present only 2,500 people out of the total 1.1m population live within the centre and while average property prices across Birmingham have risen 3 per cent over the past year, slightly below the UK average, they remain 9 per cent down on 2007 levels.

For Birmingham, Britain’s second city with the largest population and GDP outside London, things looked very different seven years ago, before the downturn in the UK housing market. Then the city’s inner core was filled with flamboyant schemes, such as The Mailbox, a revamped old postal centre, and The Cube, an aluminium-clad 25-storey block, where asking prices were more than £500 per sq ft. The penthouse in a 24-storey tower was on sale for £1.65m and there were plans for a 50-storey project, which aimed to do the same for Birmingham that the Sears Tower did for Chicago.

Birmingham house prices
Today the city centre market looks more modest. Property consultant Jones Lang LaSalle says most new-build schemes in Birmingham are priced at £220 to £250 per sq ft with a few in prime sites at £300. There is only a small pipeline of new schemes. “There were far too many apartments of all shapes and sizes built in the city centre and the market was completely flooded. These have now dropped significantly in price,” says Sue Bennett of Hadleigh estate agency. Now high-end buyers look not to the centre but instead at two affluent suburbs with good schools – Edgbaston and Harborne – plus easily accessible areas outside the city. Edgbaston has 20,000 residents living in a range of Georgian, Victorian and interwar family houses. The area was spared the substantial industrial and commercial developments seen in much of the rest of Birmingham thanks to a ban on the construction of factories and warehouses in the 19th century. As a result, the area is leafy, quiet and regarded as one of the prime city addresses, yet less than two miles southwest of the centre. There are a number of houses in Edgbaston with substantial grounds, such as Aldorham, an eight-bedroom Victorian house set 200ft back from the road with 1.2 acres of grounds. The property is on sale through Fine & Country for £2.75m. Close by is a Georgian house with seven bedrooms, priced at £2.3m with Bowkett Briggs.

Harborne, a suburb just east of Edgbaston, consists mostly of 1930s houses with large gardens. Among the larger homes is an eight-bedroom house with 5,100 sq ft of living space, extensive parking and garaging, priced at £2.5m through Ribchester. Purchasers in these locations include those working at the city’s four universities, returning expats and long-term visitors from overseas posted to major employers in the city such as Jaguar Land Rover and Cadbury Trebor Bassett. Buyers looking further afield might wish to consider Solihull, nine miles from the centre and a 15-minute drive to Birmingham airport, or Sutton Coldfield, a town described as “Birmingham’s answer to Ascot” by James Way of Knight Frank because of its glut of high-end gated houses.“The market hasn’t been strong for £1m-plus homes in the past year with very few active buyers but towards the end of last year we started to see signs of improvement,” says Way.
Local agents say some buyers considering Sutton Coldfield are being deterred by a proposal in the latest draft of the Birmingham Development Plan, which is the blueprint for building 80,000 new homes for an additional 150,000 city residents by 2031. The draft calls for up to 6,000 properties to be built on greenbelt land in the Sutton Coldfield area. Local Conservative MP Andrew Mitchell claims the Sutton proposal is unnecessary as there is existing planning consent for 17,000 new homes within Birmingham, plus more than 11,000 empty existing homes. He says: “Everyone can accept that we need to build more but brownfield sites and existing permissions already granted should bear the brunt.”

Birmingham city council recognises it needs to do more to find sites for new homes and its current level of 1,300 new homes a year is well behind its own targets of 2,500 by 2016 and more than 3,000 annually from 2021.
With buyer numbers on the rise it may turn out that it is this longstanding shortage of homes, rather than a new train line to London, that lies behind a renaissance in Birmingham’s property prices in the near future.
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Old March 24th, 2014, 10:15 PM   #869
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mediarail.be View Post
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/cfd4f96a-a...#axzz2wihrQSgE

.......and The Cube, an aluminium-clad 25-storey block, where asking prices were more than £500 per sq ft.
Yes, great times just around the corner for Birmingham with the arrival of HS2.

Hadn't realised The Cube building was made from aluminium!!!




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Old April 3rd, 2014, 04:02 PM   #870
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From Railway Gazette:

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http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/h...nsultants.html

HS2 signs up Japanese consultants
03 Apr 2014



UK: HS2 Ltd has signed a contract for consultancy services with Japan International Consultants for Transportation, a company owned 53% by East Japan Railway. The contract with an undisclosed value began on January 31 and runs for four months to May 31.

Areas covered by the deal include ways of reducing pantograph noise, methods of cutting micro-pressure waves in tunnels, reliability analysis of operations and maintenance, comparisons between slab and ballasted track designs, asset management and station management. An interim report on pantograph noise has already been submitted to HS2 Ltd.

The announcement on April 3 foreshadows JR East’s opening of a London office on April 15. According to JR East Vice-Chairman Masaki Ogata, the London office has been established to foster information exchange, carry out market research, conduct public relations activity and develop partnerships with UK companies, including suppliers. ‘JR East has a vision to develop its business globally, and we plan to share our expertise not just in the UK but worldwide’, he said.

Asked if JR East planned to bid for franchises in the UK, Ogata said ‘it is not determined yet, but we are very interested in franchises. We must do further analysis and investigate the market further’. JICT sent a fact-finding mission to the UK in March which is drawing up a report on business opportunities in the UK for Japanese operators.

Prof Andrew McNaughton, Technical Director of HS2 Ltd, said that ‘we have much to learn from our Japanese friends operating high speed railways in a densely-populated urban environment’. Noting that ‘in Japan you can see how cities have regenerated on the back of investment in high speed rail’, he said that HS2 needed to operate ‘utterly safely’ and ‘with Japanese reliability. When it opens, it has to work, and it has to work fabulously for many decades’, he asserted.

The agreement with JICT and JR East ‘gives us access to deep knowledge’ of high speed rail, he continued, including integration with the conventional network. This was a reference to JR East’s mini-Shinkansen services which operate over regauged routes to reach cities off the high speed network such as Akita and Yamagata in northern Japan. These are comparable to HS2’s proposed services to cities not on the HS2 route using ‘classic-compatible’ trains.
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Old April 3rd, 2014, 10:26 PM   #871
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From Railway Gazette:
They're really doing well with exporting expertise. Texas is also consulting with JR Central (though, I don't think this particularly management company). Quite interesting.
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Old April 18th, 2014, 04:04 PM   #872
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From Camden New Journal:

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http://www.camdennewjournal.com/news...er-camden-town

Exclusive: Boris Johnson asks government to build HS2 link tunnel under Camden Town
16 April, 2014, by TOM FOOT

MAYOR of London Boris Johnson will call for a giant tunnel to be built under Camden to replace the abandoned HS1/HS2 link line as part of a formal objection to High Speed 2 next month.

In a letter to Transport secretary Patrick McLoughlin obtained by the New Journal, the London Mayor adopts a new, more combative and oppositionist tone on the £50billion project.

The letter, dated March 10, outlines a list of concerns about the scheme and demands that a “segregated tunnel” is built to link HS2 trains with the Eurostar railway in a move that would help HS2 “meet the longer term needs of the UK”.

Work could begin during phase 2 of the project, when the line is extended to Manchester and Leeds, which is not expected to start until 2020.

Mr Johnson warns Mr McLoughlin that he is “disappointed” with some elements of the HS2 scheme and says he will object when a parliamentary process begins next month.

His letter suggests that a “full-scale rebuilding” of Euston station could include creating 3,000 homes and 13,000 jobs and that other schemes such as Pan Camden Alliance’s double-deck down proposal should be “fully explored”.



Mr Johnson has supported plans for a wide-scale redevelopment of Euston but the concept of the tunnel, which could impact on the foundations of homes across Camden, has not yet been made public.

Last week, the London Mayor’s chief of staff Sir Eddie Lister contacted the London Assembly about Mr Johnson’s “concerns”, requesting that they joined forces to “lodge a petition against HS2” before May 16.

It added that the “Mayor’s concerns about the current HS2 Bill focus on the development and regeneration issues in two particular areas: Euston and Old Oak Common.

London Assembly Member Murad Qureshi said: “For some reason they see the need to join up with the London Assembly.

“We have been approached and it shows intent from the Mayor’s office. It may be bureaucratic language, but it is a formal approach and I think that’s intriguing.”

The Leader of the House of Commons, Andrew Lansley, announced on Thursday that the second reading of the HS2 Bill will begin on April 28.

Local authorities and businesses have until May 16 to respond to the Bill, while individuals have a further week until May 23.

Camden Council has been lobbying against the £20 cost of lodging a petition against HS2
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Old April 29th, 2014, 10:44 AM   #873
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High speed rail will leave North East residents 'lesser citizens', warns MP

Firstly I would mention that Simon Burns (Conservative) made a notable remark in yesterdays Commons debate on HS2, that he was looking forward to HS3 when the rail link will advance to Glasgow and across to Edinburgh - so is the North East coast not to be involved in HS3?

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...-north-7044405

High speed rail will leave North East residents 'lesser citizens', warns MP
Apr 29, 2014 08:30 By Jonathan Walker-JOU



A high speed rail line approved by the House of Commons could mean North East residents are treated as second class citizens, an MP has warned.

Gateshead Labour MP Ian Mearns said the region had to challenge both the Government and Labour to explain how they would ensure the North East got a fair deal.

MPs have backed legislation authorising the construction of the first phase of the £50 billion High Speed Two (HS2) project, running from London to Birmingham, while a second stretch of line is planned to run from Birmingham to Manchester and to Yorkshire. But there are no firm plans to extend the line to the North East, although high speed trains will transfer on to the East Coast Main Line and continue to Newcastle.

Newcastle City Council hopes to use the project to boost the local economy, and city council leader Nick Forbes has written to Treasury Minister Lord Deighton calling for Government support for upgrading Newcastle Central station to ensure it is ready to become a terminus for high-speed trains.

But Mr Mearns said that without action to back the region, the North East would find itself sandwiched between Scotland, which enjoys high levels of devolution and could become an independent country in a referendum this year, and cities served by the new line. He said: “We could be in a situation where Scotland has a greater deal of autonomy through more devolution, if they haven’t gone independent, and they carry on doing economic development. Then you have these honey-pots being created in West Yorkshire and Greater Manchester, so where will the North East of England lie in terms of competition for inward investment and competition for growth finds when £50 billion is being earmarked for HS2 itself?” He added: “I think we have to pose the question, are we being treated as lesser citizens in the UK context? And I think at the moment unfortunately we are, so we’ve got to be asking the leaders of all the political parties, including my own, how are we going to redress that balance?”

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...-north-7044405
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Old May 3rd, 2014, 06:58 PM   #874
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From The Scotsman:

Quote:
http://www.scotsman.com/news/transpo...mond-1-3386646

Scotland would beat UK to high speed rail - Salmond
24 April 2014, by SCOTT MACNAB

Ambitious proposals which could see a Scottish high speed rail (HSR) link built and operating decades before the current UK plans were unveiled by Alex Salmond last night

The First Minister said that the Scottish Government would “not wait 30 years for high speed rail” to be delivered by Westminster and pledged to commission a feasibility study on work on HSR beginning from the north heading south, if Scotland becomes independent.

The announcement follows recent reports that the proposed third phase of the current high speed two (HS2) scheme from either Leeds or Manchester to Glasgow and Edinburgh would be ditched after a Yes vote.

Mr Salmond was addressing a St George’s Day audience in Carlisle last night as he set out plans for closer economic ties between Scotland and the north of England after independence.

“Under Westminster control, high speed rail won’t come to Carlisle for decades,” he said.

“An independent Scotland could do more. Rather than paying our share of the borrowing costs for high speed rail, as we wait decades for it to spread up from the south, we can use that money to build high speed rail from the north instead.

“It’s time to take positive action. I can confirm today that the Scottish Government will build on the joint work we are undertaking with the UK government.

“We will establish a feasibility study to explore in detail the options for building high speed rail from Scotland to England. In doing so, we will work closely with partners across the UK, 
especially in the north of England. Of course we can’t determine the route until we undertake the feasibility study. But it is a statement of intent.”

The UK’s only high speed rail service at the moment is the Eurostar from London to Paris via the Channel Tunnel. HS2 would see a first phase from London to Birmingham.

It would split from there to both Manchester and Leeds in phase 2. Intermediate stations in the East Midlands and South Yorkshire are also planned. If phase 3 to Scotland goes ahead, it would take more than an hour off journeys between London and Edinburgh or Glasgow –which currently take between 4 hours 15 minutes and 5 hours.

But it would add billions to the £40bn scheme which is 
already attracting criticism.

HS2 would see the introduction of 400m-long (1,300ft) trains with up to 1,100 seats. It would operate at speeds of up to 250mph – Eurostar, TGV and Thalys services in Europe currently hit around 185mph – and would travel up to 14 times per hour in each direction. The London-West Midlands section is expected to open in 2026 and the onwards legs to Manchester and Leeds by 2032-33.

An unnamed UK cabinet minister claimed earlier this month the extra link north of the Border was almost inconceivable in the event of a Yes vote for independence, amid concerns over the extra public investment.

Lib Dem leader Willie Rennie said last night: “By removing Scotland from the UK [Salmond] removes Scotland of any influence over acceleration of high speed rail. HSR is not an argument for independence, it’s an argument for working together.”

Scottish Conservative transport spokesman Alex Johnstone said: “The only viable way to ensure an interconnected high speed rail between the Central Belt and England is by remaining part of the UK. If Scotland was to separate from Britain there would be no reason for the UK to move beyond the current plan of Leeds and Manchester.”
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Old May 6th, 2014, 10:54 AM   #875
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High speed rail plans may end up slowing the North East down

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-slow-7073695

High speed rail plans may end up slowing the North East down
May 06, 2014 06:30 By Adrian Pearson



High speed rail will slow down services from the North East to Scotland and reduce London journeys by just 11 minutes, the region is today warned.

A series of route documents have shown how the North will be increasingly isolated if the £42bn railway project is completed.

After a trickle of concerns at the plans for a new railway emerged over the last year, the final picture increasingly shows a high speed network in which Newcastle actually loses services.

Consultation documents put out by HS2 and Network Rail show:

* From 2033, Newcastle’s direct trains to and from Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow are replaced by a stopping service calling at small towns throughout the line, hugely adding to journey times;
* All London to Scotland services will go up the West Coast;
* High speed rail will replace, not add, to all existing East Coast London to Newcastle routes in order to free up capacity south of York;
* Under High speed plans, Durham would lose out on direct links, while Darlington moves from two trains an hour to London to one train;
* Total journey saving times to London when Durham’s Hitachi trains are built are just 11 minutes.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-slow-7073695
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Old May 12th, 2014, 06:28 PM   #876
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From Ham & High:

Quote:
http://www.hamhigh.co.uk/news/euston...e_in_1_3595957

Euston station plans hang in the balance as overseas developers move in
Monday, May 12, 2014


One of the proposed designs for Euston station that has surfaced

The future of Euston station continues to hang in the balance amid concerns from campaigners that the interests of private developers and property speculators are winning over senior political figures.

Campaigners and architects promoting what they say is a community-backed proposal for the redesign of the proposed London terminus for High Speed 2 rail link say their plans have not been given a fair hearing, and that senior officials seem intent on a design that could “wreck” the surrounding community.

It comes as Camden Council said it would be calling for Old Oak Common – a proposed HS2 station to the north – to be used as a temporary terminus for HS2 to allow more time to be given to the design and construction of Euston.

The call follows senior ministers and officials within HS2 Ltd issuing their support for a “really big” development on the site.

Concerned over the impact it could have on the community, Camden campaigners have called for any redevelopment to be done within the existing footprint of the station, known as the Double Deck Down 2 (DDD2) design.

They claim that the lure of overseas developers to London and skyscraper-style developments has meant views of Camden residents risk being ignored – and could mean hundreds of homes and businesses being demolished.

Jeff Travers, a railway architect behind DDD2, said: “I fear there’s a hidden agenda with what is happening at Euston – and that’s a private land grab at the expense of the local community.

“It’s obviously in the interests of private developers that the land is snapped up on the cheap using compulsory purchase orders and given to them as one big slab to develop.

“And the fear is that senior political figures may have been won over by the interests of large developers. But there’s an alternative to this.

“Not only is our DDD2 station design community-backed, but it also works well within the footprint of the existing station.

“It will also allow for incremental (lower risk) development on sites surrounding the station – which is much more community focused and controlled.”

The experience of the campaigners comes as another London MP, a supporter of HS2, expressed his concerns that a similar scenario is unfolding in his constituency.

Andy Slaughter, Labour MP for Hammersmith, warned the government that his community had been “intimidated and threatened” over the regeneration of Old Oak Common station in Hammersmith and Fulham.

The station is set to be a stop on the HS2 line and the area earmarked for regeneration.

Mr Slaughter complained that original estimates over job numbers had been almost halved, and that this was an example of “another land grab”.

He pleaded for the area to be “controlled by the local people” instead.

Outside influence in Euston has been spurred by the eagerness of senior government members and the head of HS2 Ltd.

Euston landowner Sydney and London Properties has already mocked up a Euston Visionary Masterplan for Euston station – an enormous above-station redevelopment with skyscrapers and shops – as well as announced a partnership with US real estate giant Related Companies, a developer building an above-station development in New York.

Camden Council, the Greater London Authority and HS2 Ltd are all involved in talks over the future of the area.

Cllr Sarah Hayward, leader of the council, said: “I’m concerned that government ministers have a plan to use Euston as a cash cow for HS2.

“It’s too early to say whether we’re getting a fair say in the talks.

“I’d say we’re making baby steps in the right direction –but I remain sceptical.

“The plan that is agreed upon could stay with us for 100 years – so we need to get it right and make sure it benefits Camden residents.

“We need it to provide jobs and housing for local people.”
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Old May 13th, 2014, 10:18 PM   #877
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The main issue I can see with the DDD proposal for Euston is: how would you build it? At first glance it is an attractive proposition in that it reduces the local impact, but trying to build a double-deck station whilst keeping the existing station working would be well-nigh impossible. The backers of the scheme seem to be strangely silent on this aspect, probably because they haven't been able to come up with a credible proposition either.
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Old May 22nd, 2014, 02:43 PM   #878
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From Construction Enquirer:

Quote:
http://www.constructionenquirer.com/...ase-one-build/

HS2 poaches Thameslink boss for phase one build
Thu 22nd May


Crawford took over the Thameslink programme in 2009

HS2 has lured another senior Network Rail chief over to the £43bn high speed rail project

Jim Crawford joins as programme director for phase one. At Network Rail he worked as major programme director for the £6.5bn congestion-busting Thameslink upgrade.

Crawford, 48, has worked on the railway since 1994 as a consultant working for Turner & Townsend.

HS2 Ltd Construction CEO Simon Kirby said: “Building Britain’s much-needed high speed rail network will be a major undertaking and we need the best people to help deliver it on schedule and within the budget we have been set.

“Jim Crawford‘s experience speaks for itself but I know just how capable he is from our time together at Network Rail working on the multi-billion pound investment in Thameslink.

“I am very pleased that someone of Jim’s calibre is joining us as we have much to do between now and when we expect to have spades in the ground in 2017.”

Crawford took over the Thameslink programme in 2009 delivering some notable milestones, including the rebuilding of London Blackfriars and Farringdon stations.

At HS2 Ltd he will be completing the set up of the team that will be responsible for the delivery of the multi-billion pound construction programme for the first phase of the new high speed rail network between London and West Midlands.

The exodus of senior Network Rail bosses started after chief executive Sir David Higgins stood down to lead the HS2 project at the start of this year.

He was followed by Network Rail’s managing director of infrastructure projects Simon Kirby, who will join HS2 as CEO for the project’s construction phase.

Away from the HS2 project, Network Rail infrastructure’s finance boss David McLoughlin also handed in his notice at the start of the year to run contractor Spencer Rail in July.

Even more recently Simon Wright OBE, currently project development director at Network Rail, has accepted the job to become Crossrail’s new programme director this summer
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Old June 18th, 2014, 07:28 PM   #879
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From Global Rail News:

Quote:
http://www.globalrailnews.com/2014/0...lege-location/

Shortlist revealed for HS2 college location
17 JUN, 2014

Birmingham, Derby, Doncaster and Manchester have been shortlisted as possible locations for a new high-speed rail engineering college in the UK.

Cities and towns around the country had bid to become the home of the National College for High Speed Rail, which will train the next generation of rail engineers.

The shortlisted locations were chosen because of the size and availability of a suitable site, accessibility, and the potential to develop strong links with rail employers and providers.

Skills and Enterprise Minister Matthew Hancock said: “I was extremely encouraged by the level of interest that has been shown by areas across the country in being part of meeting the high speed rail skills challenge.

“We received a number of very strong proposals, and not all can be taken forward to the final stage. However, it is clear that there is already some excellent partnership activity taking place between education providers and the rail industry across the country which is resulting in the delivery of some outstanding provision.”

Crossrail chairman Terry Morgan, who has been brought in as an advisor, said: “Engineering skills are vital to the rail industry, and I am hugely excited to be given the opportunity to help shape the design and development of the new college.

“We need to ensure that the college can deliver the top class training and qualifications needed, both for high speed rail and other future infrastructure projects across the country.

“I came from a vocational background, and I think the high speed rail college is a fantastic opportunity to inspire a new generation of motivated young people to follow this pathway.”
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Old June 23rd, 2014, 01:25 PM   #880
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From Construction Enquirer:

Quote:
http://www.constructionenquirer.com/...for-the-north/

Chancellor floats HS3 plan for the North
Mon 23rd June 2014, 7:29

Chancellor George Osborne will today call for a third high speed rail line linking Manchester and Leeds

The project would be based on the existing Manchester-to-Leeds rail line but journey times would be speeded up by building new tunnels and infrastructure.

Speaking in Manchester today, the Chancellor is expected to say: “The cities of the North are individually strong, but collectively not strong enough.

“The whole is less than the sum of its parts. So the powerhouse of London dominates more and more. And that’s not healthy for our economy. It’s not good for our country.”

“Today I want us to start thinking about whether to build a new high-speed rail connection east-west from Manchester to Leeds. A third high speed railway for Britain.”

Although no timescale or budget for HS3 has been fixed, Osborne’s move is a sign that the Government is worried that the recovery is unbalanced
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