search the site
 daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > North East England > Newcastle Metro Area

Newcastle Metro Area For Newcastle, N Tyneside, Gateshead, S Tyneside, South Northumberland



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 5th, 2010, 10:34 PM   #21
NewcastleStu
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,026
Likes (Received): 69

Looks like it'll be a hell of an improvement over the current area which is depressing!
NewcastleStu no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 11th, 2010, 06:29 PM   #22
Stamford
Registered User
 
Stamford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Crawley
Posts: 3,127
Likes (Received): 683

Cathedral Square

11th November 2010

The platform now completely gone and Queen Vic is left high and dry



Stamford no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 19th, 2010, 01:39 PM   #23
Stamford
Registered User
 
Stamford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Crawley
Posts: 3,127
Likes (Received): 683

Cathedral Square

18th November 2010





Stamford no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 14th, 2010, 12:04 AM   #24
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,445
Likes (Received): 1553

.
Looking at this map, the next time I go past St Nicholas' Cathedral I am sure that it will occur to me just "how many changes" that place (that can so clearly be seen on this map from 1590!) has seen happen all around it !!


The original of this map is preserved in the British Museum. It is the earliest map of Newcastle.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 29th, 2010, 08:17 PM   #25
Stamford
Registered User
 
Stamford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Crawley
Posts: 3,127
Likes (Received): 683

Cathedral Square

29th December 2010



Stamford no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 14th, 2011, 06:01 PM   #26
Stamford
Registered User
 
Stamford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Crawley
Posts: 3,127
Likes (Received): 683

Cathedral Square

14th January 2011



Stamford no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2011, 07:30 PM   #27
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,445
Likes (Received): 1553

West End church wants old wedding snaps
by Sara Nichol, Evening Chronicle, January 19th 2011



FOR nearly two centuries it’s been at the heart of life in Newcastle’s West End.

And now, happy memories of St James’ Parish Church, in Benwell, will be finding their way out of forgotten photo albums and back into the community that made them.

The church has launched a project to celebrate its 180th anniversary by asking locals to dig out wedding photos taken at the building.

The aim is to highlight the church’s role in the colourful corner of Tyneside by delving into people’s personal memories, and the services it has provided through the decades.

The photos, which will be scanned and returned to their owners, will form a special exhibition, to run in the summer, before they become a permanent collection in the West End Library.

Community researcher and development worker Judith Green said the church is one of a few buildings still standing that acts as a monument to the area’s history.


Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...#ixzz1BVVjoPBX
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 2nd, 2011, 04:11 PM   #28
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,445
Likes (Received): 1553

Quote:
Originally Posted by jkkne View Post
Don't like those border 'barricades' at all

Reminds me of the old pipework on a Mario Brothers game!!

This is what the design shows the finished area will look like . .

Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 2nd, 2011, 04:33 PM   #29
Chatton11
Registered User
 
Chatton11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: York
Posts: 779
Likes (Received): 22

It seems odd that they've gone for a red sandstone, when Newcastle is predominantly a yellow sandstone
Chatton11 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 2nd, 2011, 05:45 PM   #30
paddytoonleics
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne
Posts: 966
Likes (Received): 132

I think the red stone will age quite nicely there, bit of a change. St Nick's has a different colour tone anyway to much of its surroundings, so it'll work quite nicely.

I'm guessing they did it to match the plynth QV's parked her arse on?
paddytoonleics no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2011, 02:42 PM   #31
paddytoonleics
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne
Posts: 966
Likes (Received): 132

The Guardian are way out there, calling St A's 18th Century!! More like 12th C, in its current form.

paddytoonleics no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2011, 02:56 PM   #32
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,799
Likes (Received): 3830

Quote:
Originally Posted by AngerOfTheNorth View Post
I think it might be pleached trees
Well I took a walk down to the site this morning to take a look for myself and talking to the two workmen on site gathered that:

1. There was no archaeological dig on the site - the white tent is the builders so they can work in the rain.
2. Red sandstone 'walls' with the surface (now going down) from granite.

Here are few photographs - not sure what the 'frieze' type construction around the sides is going to be? - that's why I asked the other day if anyone had seen the Planning Application?











More shots @ http://www.fototime.com/inv/1669BE344222021
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2011, 02:59 PM   #33
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,799
Likes (Received): 3830

Quote:
Originally Posted by paddytoonleics View Post
The Guardian are way out there, calling St A's 18th Century!! More like 12th C, in its current form
Perhaps they are getting confused with ST ANDREWS CHURCH in Worswick Street - erected in 1875?
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2011, 05:34 PM   #34
GBDT
Registered User
 
GBDT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,232
Likes (Received): 311

Quote:
Originally Posted by paddytoonleics View Post
The Guardian are way out there, calling St A's 18th Century!! More like 12th C, in its current form
The St Andrew's Church website gives the following:

The Parish Church of St Andrew is traditionally recognised as 'the oldest church in this town'. The present building was begun in the 12th Century and the last addition to it, apart from the vestries, was the main porch in 1726...

The last part to be built may be in the 18th Century, but it started in the
12th with a number of additions/extensions added to it in the 600 years!

There is a plan in thje church showing the ages of the different bits of the church.

Cheers
GBDT
GBDT no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2011, 06:11 PM   #35
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,799
Likes (Received): 3830

Quote:
Originally Posted by GBDT View Post
The St Andrew's Church website gives the following:

The Parish Church of St Andrew is traditionally recognised as 'the oldest church in this town'. The present building was begun in the 12th Century and the last addition to it, apart from the vestries, was the main porch in 1726...

The last part to be built may be in the 18th Century, but it started in the
12th with a number of additions/extensions added to it in the 600 years!

There is a plan in thje church showing the ages of the different bits of the church.

Cheers
GBDT
I walked past St Andrews this morning and did see that they have a notice board on Newgate Street making the claim that they are the oldest Church in Newcastle. Also interesting to read on the Churches web site that a SAXON Church may have existed on the site. Certainly in the pamphlet book "A Guide to the Anglican Churches In Newcastle and Northumberland", edited by Stanley Prins and Roger Massingberd-Mundy it is claimed the Church was Concecrated 'probably' in the 10th Century.

I have a guide book for the Church dating from 1961 and it has this to be say about the Saxon claim:

'The late Mr H L Honeyman advanced the theory that there was a building on the site before the 1150 date, a smaller Church built by the Monks from Hexham during Saxon times. The only tangible evidence supporting this claim is a child's tomb stone which is considered of Pre-Conquest date and which was found in the South Transept in 1844.'
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 4th, 2011, 12:37 PM   #36
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,799
Likes (Received): 3830

Came across this clipping from the Newcastle Evening Chronicle dating from September 2002. Wonder if the 1955 redevelopment was the last time this area outside of the Cathedral was a construction site?

__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2011, 03:13 PM   #37
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,445
Likes (Received): 1553

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Perhaps another difficult one? - this is on an external wall which is visible to the public. Coat of ARMS might give a hint, although not the same spelling. Also a connection with cereals and height.


This is one of those photos where you feel you have seen it a million times, but you can't remember where, or perhaps you just "think" you've seen it!

Anyway, I wonder if it could be the former "Alms House" (different spelling . . . ) that is the Holy Jesus Hospital.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 20th, 2011, 12:32 PM   #38
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,799
Likes (Received): 3830

Hospital of St Mary the Virgin Almshouses

Quote:
Originally Posted by CDB00 View Post
Cereal and height - Rye Hill
Arms by another spelling - alms

So it's the almshouse on the Newcastle College site on Rye Hill
The reason that I thought of this one was the recent publicity concerning the sale of land in the Stephenson Quarter by the HOSPITAL OF ST MARY THE VIRGIN TRUST.

Hospital of St Mary the Virgin Almshouses - surely one of Newcastle's 'hidden gems'. Still operating as sheltered housing with accommodation for 17 residents.

More photographs can be seen @ http://www.fototime.com/inv/F5356758E453A68




Following data ourtesy of http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co...rgin-almshouse

Quote:
Grade: II
Date Listed: 11 April 1973
OS Grid Reference: NZ2383863722
OS Grid Coordinates: 423838, 563722
Latitude/Longitude: 54.9676, -1.6292
Location: Rye Hill, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE13 6BW
Locality: Newcastle Upon Tyne
Local Authority: North Tyneside
County: Tyne And Wear
Country: England
Postcode: NE13 6BW

NZ 26 SW NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE RYE HILL
(west side)

11/4/73 Hospital of St. Mary the Virgin Almshouses
G.V. II

Almshouses. - Main range and South-east wing of 1858. Wings running Northward at either end added 1916 in keeping with original building.

Snecked sandstone with ashlar dressings. High pitched roof of graduated green slates. Gothic style. Two storeys.

Main range ten bays long. Most of the windows paired cusped lancets with
iron casements: some first floor windows have round-shouldered lintels, also in C13 style.

On North front and in wing eaves are broken by stone - coped gables.

South-east wing has cusped lancets in groups of two or three under a wider arch with a quatrefoil light above them. Plain paired sashes on South front.

Pointed- arched doorways under hoodmoulds with headstops. Decorative iron door furniture. Inscriptions and coats of arms above doors.

Listing NGR: NZ2383863722


There is quite a lot written and recorded about the history of the Hospital and a good on line source is http://www.british-history.ac.uk/rep...x?compid=43331
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 20th, 2011, 04:30 PM   #39
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,799
Likes (Received): 3830

Jesmond Old Cemetery Crypts

Following on from the theme of Newcastle's subterranean buildings I thought I would give mention to the CRYPTS at JESMOND OLD CEMETERY.



I made a visit during the 2002 Heritage Open Days when the Crypt at Jesmond Old Cemetery was opened to the public.

The Crypt or Catacombs are beneath the Chapels at the main entrance to the Cemetery and at the time were being used by Tyne & Wear Archaeology Department for storage purposes.

There are some 22 shelves within the Crypt, which enabled coffins to be stored prior to burial. This was not a Crypt for the final resting place of bodies. Indeed one theory is that bodies were secured within the Crypt for up to 10 days prior to burial, thus allowing decomposition to take place, this then put off any grave robbers from disinterring the bodies from their final resting place.

There is also evidence that the Crypts may have been used as air raid shelters during World War 2.

More photographs from the visit @ http://www.fototime.com/inv/500EAFD1921D3BF
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2011, 08:29 AM   #40
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 35,799
Likes (Received): 3830

Let's see if anyone can come up with the answer as to where this piece of art can be seen

__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
cathedral, cathedrals, church, churches, historic newcastle, newcastle, religious buildings

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu