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Old February 25th, 2011, 11:50 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WilfBurnsFan View Post
Is it on the back of 'The Response' war memorial?

On edit:

No, not The Response...No transport? The 'standing' St George statue for the Royal Tank Regoment memorial by St Thmas's, the one that was restored shortly before 'The Rsponse' was?
Well done Wilf, it is indeed the ROYAL TANK REGIMENT WAR MEMORIAL that stands just to the side of the entrance to the Church of St Thomas the Martyr at Barras Bridge.

The hint was that there are of course two St George Memorials in the City, the other being in Eldon Square but that sculpture has the "transport", i.e. a horse

Grade II Listed, this is the listing description courtesy of http://lbonline.english-heritage.org...04388&search=y

Quote:
Listing Text:

NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE BARRAS BRIDGE (south end)
NZ 2464 NE
16/86 Royal Tank Regiment War
Memorial.
17.12.71
G.V.
II

War Memorial. Circa 1920. By J.Reid. Portland stone with granite steps; bronze
statue and bands; enamel plaque. Curved steps to terrace in front of low curved seats, whose backs have inscribed bands and end in low square piers. Central pedestal, with enamel of St. George and the dragon, bearing standing life-size figure of the same theme.

Listing NGR: NZ2485864895
The thing that I've found odd about this memorial is that it was originally a memorial to 6th Royal Northumberland Fusiliers (Terratorials) 1914-1918. Now I'm wondering why the later dedication takes precedents in the name to which the memorial is now known. I wonder if the 6th RNF became a Tank Regiment?.

Here is a wider view of the memorial:

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Old February 25th, 2011, 05:57 PM   #42
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Cathedral Square

25th February 2011





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Old February 27th, 2011, 10:59 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
I would say it is a photo taken from the Lantern Tower of St Nicholas' Cathedral.

It is the only place it can be.

The building with the "five white inverted V shapes" on the roof, is definitely the building at the top of Dean Street (on the right as you go down from the junction with Mosely Street, called 'Cathedral Buildings') but - and this confused things for a while - the photo shows the back view of the roof Vs!

Hmm, I'm pretty certain . . . ?
Good deduction NH, it is indeed a stone in the wall underneath the 15 Century Lantern Tower of Cathedral Church of St Nicholas. Another view experienced during the HODs after a climb up a VERY tight spiral staircase.

Here is another shot that gives a view 'over the wall':



Grade 1 Listed Building and this is the Text Description courtesy of http://lbonline.english-heritage.org...04830&search=y

Quote:
Building Name: CATHEDRAL OF ST NICHOLAS
Parish: NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
District: NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
County: TYNE AND WEAR

LBS Number: 304830
Grade: I
Date Listed: 14/06/1954
NGR: NZ2498964007

Listing Text:

NZ 2464 SE, NZ 2564 SW, NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE ST NICHOLAS' STREET
NZ 2463 NE, NZ 2563 NW (east side)
20/, 21/, 23/ and 24/490 Cathedral of St.Nicholas
14.6.54
G.V I

Parish church; cathedral since 1882. Mostly mid C14, incorporating earlier work in N.W. crossing and north arcade; C15 tower and spire. Many alterations later include the addition of north and south porches in C19 by J. Green and Dobson.

Sandstone, coursed and squared except for modern ashlar; lead-covered roofs.

West tower with transepts and porches; aisled nave with south chapel; transepts; aisled chancel with north chapel and south vestry (with Thomlinson Library St. Nicholas Churchyard,q.v.).

Decorated windows in transepts, south aisle and clerestory, Perpendicular elsewhere; many renewed. Renewed west and late C20 north and south doors in moulded arches, the latter under tall windows, in gabled porches.

3-stage tower has big polygonal buttresses; 5-light window above door; small 2-light windows and tall paired 2-light belfry openings in upper stages; high pierced, battlemented parapet has centre-side pinnacles and taller corner pinnacles which enclose 4 flying buttresses holding square lantern;
smaller pinnacles and battlemented parapet on this surround slender octagonal spire.

Interior: coursed squared sandstone with ashlar dressings; arch-braced panelled roofs with heraldic bosses. 4-bay nave and 4-bay chancel arcades have octagonal columns with plinths but without capitals, the triple-chamfered arches springing directly from them; high crossing arches in similar style, but chancel arch on responds with capitals. Tower has arches in similar style with 5 chamfers; ribbed vault. Head-stopped drip-moulds to arcades; string and drip-moulds to aisle; plain clerestory. Low blind arcade on south wall interrupted by chapel. Crypt in north transept has 5-mouchette window and chamfered segmental transverse ribs.

Octagonal stone font with arms of Robert Rhodes, a C15 benefactor, and
high crocketed cover. Pre-reformation brass eagle lectern. South chapel has
medieval roundel of the Virgin and Child in each window; much C19 glass
commemorating local industrialists and Grey of Falloden.

Monuments: 2 medieval grave covers, one with head and feet of body depicted in 'openings ; C14 effigy of knight with shield, lamb at feet; large high-quality C15 incised brass from the grave of Roger Thornton in All Saints', on south chancel aisle wall; several C17 memorials including large sculpture of the Maddison family at prayer; Matthew Ridley, d. 1778, by J. Bacon in classical style; Admiral Collingwood, d. 1810, by Rossi; Matthew White Ridley of Blagdon Hall, died 1813, as a Roman by Flaxman; Calverly Bewicke, died 1815, by Baily; R.H. Williamson died 1835, by Dunbar; alabaster effigy of J.C. Bruce by George simmonds, dated 1896; effigy of Bishop Wilberforce, 1908, by F. W. Pomeroy.
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Old March 11th, 2011, 01:47 PM   #44
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So where is this plaque?

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Old March 11th, 2011, 07:48 PM   #45
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Cathedral Square

11th March 2011







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Old March 12th, 2011, 12:10 AM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
So where is this plaque?
St. Nich's Cemetery on Nuns Moor Road

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Old March 12th, 2011, 10:37 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monkchester View Post
St. Nich's Cemetery on Nuns Moor Road

Chris
www.monkchester.co.uk
Hi Chris - you should know as plenty of photographs on your fine site of ST NICHOLAS' CEMETERY and good to 'see' you

The West gateway, walls and gates of St. Nicholas' Cemetery are Grade II Listed and here is the Listing Text courtesy of http://lbonline.english-heritage.org...04965&search=y

Quote:
Building Name: WEST GATEWAY, WALLS AND GATES OF ST NICHOLAS CEMETERY
Parish: NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
District: NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
County: TYNE AND WEAR

LBS Number: 304965
Grade: II
Date Listed: 30/03/1987
NGR: NZ2276264939

NZ 26 SW NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE WINGROVE AVENUE (east side, off)
11/610 West gateway, walls and gates of St. Nicholas' Cemetery

Gate piers, gateway, walls and gates of cemetery. Dated 1857 above pedestrian entrance. Sandstone ashlar piers, snecked sandstone walls with ashlar coping; wrought iron gates. Vehicle entrance piers flanked by quadrant wall at left containing pedestrian entrance; serpentine wall at right. Gothic style.

2 tall octagonal piers have 4 gabled side buttresses with cusped panels; steeply-sloped overlapping coping with top quatrefoil band; large seahorse finials support shields facing across gate, that at left: with low relief of ship wrecked on rocks, that at right with low relief of ship in full sail. Shouldered head to gateway at left has carved flowers in spandrels and date panel above under raised brattished panel. Walls have steeply- sloped overlapping coping continuous with that of piers. Gothic arcaded gates with fleur-de-lis finials.
As a side issue the Cemetery is also notable for the SMUGGLERS HOLE that exists within its grounds, albeit now completely sealed up. Here is the tale:

Quote:
May 31st 1822

In consequence of information to the excise officers of Newcastle, an illicit distillery was discovered in the waste of an old coal mine, in a field near Fenham Hall, adjoining the Town-moor.

The mine appeared to be one of the most ancient in that part of the country, and was surrounded by furze and underwood.

At the bottom of the shaft, which was gained by a gradual descent of several yards, was a small aperture like the mouth of an oven, which could only be entered by crawling; this led to a large apartment in the mine, wherein were found two stills, with about 200 gallons of wash, and a complete distillery apparatus, valued in all at about £50. It appeared to have been abruptly abandoned for fear of detection.

A long chimney, built with brick, conveyed the smoke into the old workings, whence the neighbouring pits had a draught. The coal of the mine supplied the fuel necessary for the work; water was also found upon the spot.

As soon as the discovery was known, hundreds of persons visited the place, many of whom were induced to explore "The Smuggler's Hole," as it was now called, and some who ventured into it had to stay much longer than they calculated on.

About four o'clock on the morning of the 6th of June, three young men, to gratify their curiosity, ventured in about a mile, it was supposed, from the entrance. They had provided themselves with candles, which they considered sufficient for their purpose; they had, however, proceeded too far, and not having marked their way, were unable to retrace their steps, and their candles being nearly consumed, they were reduced to the necessity of making a fire with a hammer handle (which they had with them for the purpose of knocking off petrifications) and some pieces of coal which they found in the place. As the day advanced their friends became alarmed for their safety, and about twelve o'clock, some pitmen coming to the place, kindly offered their assistance, and, after some time, found the young men, who had been listening with much anxiety to hear the approach of any deliverer. They had not followed these friendly men afar, when he who carried the candle stumbled, and they were again in total darkness; and such was the difficulty of their situation, that even with these experienced guides, they were obliged to continue in this dreary cavern several hours longer, when other two pitmen proceeded in, and extricated the whole about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, the young men having been under ground without any food upwards of twelve hours.

The roof and floor of the cavity were covered with very curious petrifications, called stalactites, formed by the drippings of water.

Several other persons were liberated by pitmen, so that it became necessary to build up the aperture; but such was the curiosity of the public, that the mason work was soon demolished.

John Sykes - Local Records volume 2
"The Godfrey Edition" of the 1913 OS Map covering Arthur's Hill and Fenham shows "The Smugglers Hole" and it is or was located adjacent to the Western Wall of St Nicholas Cemetery (actually within the cemetery itself).

Some other shots of the Cemetery:





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Old March 13th, 2011, 03:52 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaywoodSis View Post
All we need to do now is get of the Cathedral Square building and the building behind it and we will have a proper public space to make the cathedral really something.

Here is a post from 2009, on the Historic Newcastle thread . . .


Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
CATHEDRAL GARDENS . . .

here is a design from the past that shows how the space formerly occupied by the 'Old Town Hall' (and currently occupied by the new 1970s office blocks) nearly could have looked . . .




What do you think?
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Old March 13th, 2011, 03:59 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
Here is a post from 2009, on the Historic Newcastle thread . . .
Marvellous sight but can you imagine the scene on a Friday nights with drunks roving about in this park and fountains

Of course there have been buildings on that spit of land for many, many centuries, so I doubt whether there was ever an uninterrupted view of St Nicholas' Cathedral Church.
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Old March 16th, 2011, 10:24 PM   #50
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Silver Street

Alan Morgan's book Victorian Panorama gives Jew-Gate, All-Hallow-Gate and Temple-Gate as previous names for the current Silver Street. He also states that Dog Bank was once called Silver Street, when the present Silver Street was known as All-Hallow-Gate. Both streets were apparently occupied by Jewish silver dealers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newcastlepubs View Post
.
Does anyone have any pics of the Temple or the cemetery ?
There's a small picture of the cemetery in Hidden Newcastle by Christopher Goulding. I don't have a copy to hand, but they've got it in the City Library.
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Old March 16th, 2011, 10:24 PM   #51
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The street was name did come from Jewish silversmiths who lived there. Temple Gate is an interesting name - it suggestes that there was a synagogue there. However, the first 'Temple' [synagogue] in Newcastle was founded by my x times great [forget how many] grandfather on what is now Temple Street. There's apparently still a small cemetery there behind the former lighting centre building but I ve never been able to get in to see it.

Does anyone have any pics of the Temple or the cemetery ?
Little snippet of information that I have on my hard drive :

The Jewish Cemetery was founded in 1835 when the Jewish Community in Newcastle purchased a plot of land, which at that time lay outside of the City Walls in an undeveloped area which was basically "countryside". However with the development and expansion of the Town Centre the Cemetery became jealously viewed by the developers of the time.

Plans were made for the area, including “The Tyne Theatre and Opera House”. Unhappy with the decision by Newcastle's Town Fathers to permit the development the Jewish Community appealed to the then Prime Minister, Lord Palmerston, but to no avail and the plans were authorised.

However, as part of the ultimate agreement to sell off the Cemetery, a section measuring some 55 square yards was to be preserved as a testimonial to the fact that a Jewish Cemetery had been there. That is what remains to this day.


Found this on the Temple Street Synagogue @ http://www.jewishgen.org/JCR-uk/comm...mple/index.htm

Official Name: Temple Street Synagogue
Address: Temple Street, Newcastle
Date Formed: 13 July 1838
Current Status: Closed about 1878
Ritual: Ashkenazi Orthodox
Congregation Numbers: 1845 - congregation had about 33 adults and 33 children

Also this @ http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/vi...d=253&letter=N

in 1838, the first regular synagogue was erected in Temple street. By 1868 the synagogue had become too small for the increasing community, and another congregation was formed under the presidency of J. de Hart, a place of worship being acquired in Charlotte square. In 1873, through the efforts of the Rev. A. L. Green, an amalgamation was arranged between the two congregations. Six years later the foundation-stone of the United Synagogue was laid by De Hart, and the building, in Leazes Park Road, was consecrated in the following year (1880). At the present time (1904) the synagogue has 220 seat-holders. There are various charities, clubs, and friendly societies, besides a bet ha-midrash

Read more: http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/vi...#ixzz1GnBPyADD




Now I might be talking through my back side here, but as part of the deal to sell off the land the Jewish Community were granted their own cemetery that remains to this day in Hazlerigg.
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Old March 16th, 2011, 10:50 PM   #52
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Now I might be talking through my back side here, but as part of the deal to sell off the land the Jewish Community were granted their own cemetery that remains to this day in Hazlerigg.
Many thanks for that.

There's also Jewish Burial ground in Westgate Cemetery; that s where X times great grandfather is lurking - Trytle Joel. He was aPpole who came out one of the many times that things became a little rough over there - described variously as a jeweler and a bullion dealer.
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Old March 16th, 2011, 11:01 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newcastlepubs View Post
Does anyone have any pics of the Temple or the cemetery ?
Found this one taken in 2004.

image hosted on flickr


P&T Image Archive, Newcastle City Council

Cheers

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Old March 16th, 2011, 11:15 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by GBDT View Post
Found this one taken in 2004.

Many thanks, I've tried to get in a few times but now the lighting centre is out of there it's hard to figure our who even has the access to it.

Quote:
Is this the building in this photo, behind All Saints Church?
It must be. I suspect looking at the roof, windows etc that the building in the pic is the one to the left [west] of the Church.

The photo seems to have been taken a little before the Swan House construction period, and looking at the cars I d say perhaps early 60s. Interesting that in the pic looking west [up the bank] the longer, narrow structure which seems to be part of the same building is not there, suggesting that s a later pic.
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Old March 16th, 2011, 11:37 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by newcastlepubs View Post
Many thanks for that.

There's also Jewish Burial ground in Westgate Cemetery; that s where X times great grandfather is lurking - Trytle Joel. He was aPpole who came out one of the many times that things became a little rough over there - described variously as a jeweler and a bullion dealer.
Do you mean St Johns Westgate and Elswick Cemetery rather than Westgate Cemetery? - that has a dedicated Jewish Section :

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Old March 17th, 2011, 12:07 AM   #56
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Originally Posted by newcastlepubs View Post
Many thanks, I've tried to get in a few times but now the lighting centre is out of there it's hard to figure our who even has the access to it.
I heard they had an agreement with the owners of the Charlton Bonds building that they'd let in anyone that asked to see it and I'm sure this agreement would have been passed on to the next owners. It also sides onto the theatre but not sure whether there is access to it from there.

Of course you could always try base jumping

F
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Old March 17th, 2011, 12:58 AM   #57
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Originally Posted by ferret88 View Post
I heard they had an agreement with the owners of the Charlton Bonds building that they'd let in anyone that asked to see it and I'm sure this agreement would have been passed on to the next owners. It also sides onto the theatre but not sure whether there is access to it from there.

Of course you could always try base jumping

F
The photo was found in a file of Charlton Bond photos. One of them shows a set of steps going down into the cemetery.

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Old March 17th, 2011, 01:04 AM   #58
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Many thanks, I've tried to get in a few times but now the lighting centre is out of there it's hard to figure our who even has the access to it.
About thirty or so years ago, I was reliably informed, that access to the cemetery was gained via the ladies toilet of "The Black Bull" on Westgate Road, (I kid you not).
The pub is now called The Bodega, just downstream of the Robert Sinclair building.

Chris
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Old March 17th, 2011, 01:16 AM   #59
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I've tried to get in a few times but now the lighting centre is out of there it's hard to figure our who even has the access to it.

Found a reference to the cemetery on this website . . . http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/

Quote:
Thornton Street Cemetery (Orthodox), off Westgate Street: Near to the Temple Street Synagogue. First cemetery of the community. In use from about 1831 to 1851. Only about five headstones remain. The www.northeastjewish.org.uk website (no longer operative) had Jewish history of the Northeast England stated that. "On October 9th 1830 seven Jewish residents entered into an agreement to pay 4p each week to form a fund to purchase a cemetery... and 250 square yards of land was purchased in Thornton Street for a burial ground. This may be the cemetery, which still exists to this day behind Waterloo Street. This site can be visited by arrangement." Last Updated on Friday, 27 August 2010 17:01
It doesn't say "who" the arrangements can be made with!
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Old March 17th, 2011, 02:30 AM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
Found a reference to the cemetery on this website . . . http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/

It doesn't say "who" the arrangements can be made with!
Quote:
About thirty or so years ago, I was reliably informed, that access to the cemetery was gained via the ladies toilet of "The Black Bull" on Westgate Road, (I kid you not).
The pub is now called The Bodega, just downstream of the Robert Sinclair building.
That s a compelling reason to visit the Bodega - and I usually don t need too much of an excuse. I knew there was a reason I liked the Bodega and Tilleys so much.

Many thanks for that. Away for a few days but I ll knock on the door again and see if I can get in. Closest I got was when viewing a flat I was interested in in the block which overlooks it. I'd rather forgotten where I was but Mrs Newcastlepubs figured out that we could just about see down into the 'courtyard'.

Thought the family are 'elsewhere' it would be nice to see it. Its always rather impressed me that he managed to get himself out of Poland and 'found' something in the city.
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