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Old March 25th, 2011, 10:50 AM   #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GBDT View Post
It is not listed but it is on the LOCAL LIST.

ID: 85. Former Jesmond Synagogue (Central New High School for Girls),
Eskdale Terrace, Jesmond,
Ward: South Jesmond
Original Nomination Number: 173

Unfortunately can't get the remaining text to copy properly!!

Have a look here, on page 81;
http://www.newcastle.gov.uk/wwwfiler...t_of_Sites.pdf

Cheers
GBDT
Thanks for confirming that for me GBDT- I wonder if it isn't Grade Listed due to the absence of a lot of the original features ?
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Old March 25th, 2011, 12:14 PM   #82
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Stab in the dark - was it the Iron Chapel that was erected whilst Jesmond Methodist (Wesleyan) Church in Clayton Road was being built?
It was an iron chapel - but not Methodist. It was the 'Church of Humanity', a very odd set up based on the ideas of the French philosopher August Comte, which was established in Newcastle by Malcolm Quin (grandfather of Joyce Quin'. Basically they believed in 'humanity' rather than 'God', but believed that religious obserance was a good thing even without God to worship. Quin came to Newcastle in 1878 nd after preaching in various small meeting rooms around the city, set up an iron church on St Mary's Place in 1886 (where the bank is now, on the corner of College Street). There in an interior decorated with busts of great philosophers Quin would deliver Invocations to Humanity and Litanies to Humanity while the congregation would deliver responses and sing hymns to Humanity. Some of the prayers were given in Italian, which Comte had decided should be the universal language. In 1904 he moved to Eskdale Terrace, and a new iron church, which, in 1909, he renamed 'St Paul's Catholic Church' after he broke with the Religion of Humanity. There he ran idiosyncratic services which were a mix of Roman Catholic liturgy (in Latin and English) and the Anglican Book of Common Prayer. It's not clear when this church closed down - probably late 1910s.

It all sounds most strange.
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Old March 25th, 2011, 12:59 PM   #83
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Originally Posted by WilfBurnsFan View Post
. . . . they believed in 'humanity' rather than 'God' . . . .

It all sounds most strange.
Any 'stranger' than the present day Humanists who would make a very similar claim? The local Humanist Society meet monthly in the Lit and Phil and have a talk on philosopher David Hume scheduled shortly in the Mining Institute.

Do we know of any images of the "Church of Humanity"'s church on Eskdale Tce?
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Old March 25th, 2011, 01:03 PM   #84
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Any 'stranger' than the present day Humanists who would make a very similar claim? The local Humanist Society meet monthly in the Lit and Phil and have a talk on philosopher David Hume scheduled shortly in the Mining Institute.

Do we know of any images of the 'Church of Humanity's' church on Eskdale Tce?
I don't think they'll be singing hymns to David Hume though!

There aren't any photos of it on the Newcastle Flickr stream (or of the St Mary's Terrace church).
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Old March 25th, 2011, 01:54 PM   #85
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I don't think they'll be singing hymns to David Hume though!

There aren't any photos of it on the Newcastle Flickr stream (or of the St Mary's Terrace church).
I'm sure I have seen a photograph in one of the books I have, that is what triggered my guess that it was an Iron Church - that said, there were quite a few of these prefabs about in the early 1900's - the original mail-order Church.
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Old March 28th, 2011, 05:10 PM   #86
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Cathedral Square

27th March 2011









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Old March 31st, 2011, 12:10 AM   #87
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I've tried the index search and failed to find anything on St Andrews Cemetery in Jesmond.
I happened to walk through the cemetery today and was shocked to find hundreds of the stones have been laid flat for Health and Safety reasons :-(
Apparently, because three children somewhere down south were injured in a cemetery, the council have had to go round knocking the stones over.
At least Orwells wife's stone is still there in tact, it even had some fresh flowers on it.
Have they done this in other cemetaries in the city? I've not noticed anything as drastic as I saw today.
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Old March 31st, 2011, 12:23 AM   #88
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I visited the nearby 'All Saints Cemetery', a few weeks ago, and there were quite a few of the older/taller headstones knocked flat.

It didn't look very good.

I haven't been into any others lately, but I would expect that it must be happening in all of them.
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Old March 31st, 2011, 02:33 AM   #89
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I was in a cemetry today which has an 'Environmental Policy' which encourages the natural growth of plant life, which in turn is expected to provide good habitat for birds and animals - it has uncontrolled brambles, nettles, ivy and grasses mixed in with the headstones.
No children or youths would get anywhere near the graves with that lot surrounding them! The only displaced headstones I was aware of were due to soil erosion.
New Southgate Cemetry in north London.
And, in my opinion, nature's wild untended growth is quite appropriate for the place where loved ones lie.
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Old March 31st, 2011, 11:53 AM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SayNoToVorderman View Post
I've tried the index search and failed to find anything on St Andrews Cemetery in Jesmond.
I happened to walk through the cemetery today and was shocked to find hundreds of the stones have been laid flat for Health and Safety reasons :-(
Apparently, because three children somewhere down south were injured in a cemetery, the council have had to go round knocking the stones over.
At least Orwells wife's stone is still there in tact, it even had some fresh flowers on it.
Have they done this in other cemetaries in the city? I've not noticed anything as drastic as I saw today.
Well the Council's have a legal responsibility to ensure the safety of visitors and their own employees for cemeteries which they own and this is why they were required to carry out 'weight testing' of headstones. The Councils have a responsibility under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

The problem with head stones is that after erection they are not maintained and whilst they may look stable in reality they are not.

The weight test involves a hand test first, i.e. does it move under finger tip/palm pressure. If it does move then it is tested with a device to see if it can resist a weight of 35kg. That weight represents a person leaning against the headstone or using it to pull then selves up from a kneeling position.

My understanding is that a notice is placed on the headstone prior to it being laid down and attempts made to contact relatives to make them aware and put in potential remedial actions. However if the headstone is in a dangerous condition it will be immediately laid down. There is no legal requirement for a Council to try and trace relatives.

Newcastle City Council say this on their web site @ http://www.newcastle.gov.uk/core.nsf...s?opendocument

Quote:
Press Release

Newcastle City Council has begun a programme of inspection of all memorials within the cities cemeteries.
Why?

Since 1995 there have been three children killed in accidents involving memorials in cemeteries. There have also been several other non-fatal incidents involving injury from falling memorials in cemeteries.

The safety of memorials in cemeteries is a nation wide problem involving Local Authorities, churchyards and private companies that manage burial grounds. Indeed this is not only a problem in the U.K. but also in Europe.

Until now we have been concentrating on making the larger memorials safe, we now have to start inspecting the smaller memorials.

An area of Byker and Heaton Cemetery has been selected as a pilot area to help assess the amount of work needed. Letters will be sent to those families with graves in the affected area asking them to arrange for a monumental mason to inspect their memorial. Where possible they will be sent to the last recorded owner of the exclusive rights to the grave. Where grave owners have not advised the Bereavement Services Office of a change of address, however, they will obviously not reach the right person.

The maintenance of the memorials is not the responsibility of the authority, but lies with the grave owner.

If memorials are found to be unstable or dangerous the grave owner should arrange to have the memorial made safe by a registered monumental mason.

Under the Local Authorities’ Cemeteries order 1977 the council does have the power to take immediate action to make dangerous memorials safe.

This may be done by laying the memorial flat, or cordoning off the grave area.

If therefore, you own or tend a memorial and you are concerned about its condition or wish to notify us of an up to date contact address please contact the

Bereavement Services Office
Room 40
Civic Centre
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 8PB

Phone 0191 2116941 or 0191 2116942
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Old March 31st, 2011, 12:16 PM   #91
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Thanks Steve..the lady at the Bereavement Services gave me a shortened version of that when I phoned them yesterday.

I still think it's wrong though..children shouldn't be playing in Cemeteries in the first place imho..and if they do play in dangerous areas then it's their fault and their parents' fault for allowing them. I feel the policy is an over-reaction. We shouldn't be making our rules and regulations to just cater for the really really stupid of society They should just put up bigger signs warning of the dangers
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Old March 31st, 2011, 12:35 PM   #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SayNoToVorderman View Post
Thanks Steve..the lady at the Bereavement Services gave me a shortened version of that when I phoned them yesterday.

I still think it's wrong though..children shouldn't be playing in Cemeteries in the first place imho..and if they do play in dangerous areas then it's their fault and their parents' fault for allowing them. I feel the policy is an over-reaction. We shouldn't be making our rules and regulations to just cater for the really really stupid of society They should just put up bigger signs warning of the dangers
Well to be honest I was probably of the same opinion as you when I first came across this situation, however when you focus on the facts it is something that Councils needed to do. Forget about the fact that this all started due to the unfortunate death of a child, that simply highlighted a problem that existed and was being conveniently ignored.

Its an unfortunate fact of life that the headstone and grave dressings are the responsibility of the family and not the Council and with that comes the need for the grave to be maintained. Of course many graves are forgotten and some have no existing relatives.

I would have liked a system put into play when any laid down headstones are photographed, the inscription recorded and that data to be available to the public. It would also be a better idea for the headstone to be laid with the inscription facing upwards but understand that this isn't always done as it is considered this could encourage weathering of the inscription.

St Andrews Cemetery is somewhere that I have yet to visit and it is the resting place of some 'famous' folk, such as:

Eileen Maud Blair - First Wife of George Orwell
Edward Brough - Grocery business
William Edward Curtis - One of Britain's first Nuclear Physicist
John Burghersh Forbes - took part in the Charge of the Light Brigade
Ralph Hedley - Artist and Wood Engraver
Zaza Ben-I Ford - An Algerian Dancer who dies in Newcastle when she was involved in performances at the 1929 North East Coast Exhibition
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Old March 31st, 2011, 06:53 PM   #93
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Mighty be a strange question but there is a reason - in modern times has anyone heard the bells of St Andrews Church (Newgate St) pealing?
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Old April 1st, 2011, 01:32 PM   #94
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I worked at Citygate (site of old Gallowgate bus station) until just over 3 years ago and often heard the bells tolling at funerals.
Never heard a proper peal though.

MAC
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Old April 1st, 2011, 04:53 PM   #95
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One for the gray matter

Historically which buildings stones have been recycled to replicate itself, then to go to a supporting role and a place of celebration?
Answer was the stones from New Gate as someone actually got.

The stones were re-used after the demolition (circa 1823) of New Gate in the building of the Newcastle Gaol (1823), when the Gaol was demolished (1925) its stones were used in the supporting wall to the Tyne Bridge on the Gateshead end and also in the building of St James and Basil's Church in Fenham.

New Gate was used as the Town's Gaol - here is a piece from the Newcastle Evening Chronicle giving its history:



Having visited St James and Basil's Church during a Heritage Open Days Weekend I wrote this little note to myself:

St James and Basil's Church on the corner of Fenham Hall Drive and Wingrove Road North. This was a Church that I had always believed to be constructed in stonework taken from the demolished Newcastle Gaol in Carliol Square. Having visited the Church I now know that to be a fact but that the facing stonework is not from the Gaol, instead it is from Kenton Quarries. So you live and learn but I see from Pevsners that he too thought the sandstone external walls had come from the Gaol so it may well be that the stones are actually on the internal structures of the Church.

The Church dates from 1927-1931 and was built by Sir James Knott in honour of his two son's, James and Basil, who had both been killed in World War One, Ypres and the Somme. Consecrated by the Bishop of Newcastle, 6th June 1931 the Church was designed by E E Lofting.

This is a photograph of the Church:



This is a shot of the retaining wall that contains stones from the Gaol:

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Old April 1st, 2011, 05:19 PM   #96
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St J&B church was where i was married and our village hall is the Knott Memorial Hall and Memorial Garden.

As an aside, gaol was the way we were taught at school to spell the now more common American jail.
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Old April 1st, 2011, 07:19 PM   #97
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.
Evening Chronicle, Wednesday 30th March 2011 . .



The recently refurbished and upgraded 'Old Eldon Square' . .
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Old April 2nd, 2011, 08:10 PM   #98
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I agree that a memorial shouldn't be defaced, vandalised or urinated on, but I think the people in this article should think before telling people how they can use public space. The statue in the middle is a memorial, but the rest of the square isn't. If people want to play football there, sit and eat, congregate etc, then they have every right.
Yes I thought it a bit rich to try and say that people shouldn't walk on the grass - I cannot think of a more pleasant sight of seeing Eldon Square used by Citizens having a pleasant lunch on the grass during the Summer. I'm not one of these people who think that grass should only be looked at

Just noticed the bit about the railing around the memorial being reinstated and hopefully stop skateboarders damaging the kerbs - why were they removed in the first place? - they were certainly there when I took these shots in circa 2000:





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Old April 7th, 2011, 07:34 PM   #99
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Cathedral Square

7th April 2011

All finished and open to Joe Public

















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Old April 9th, 2011, 01:36 PM   #100
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The St Mary's Story by Anthea Lang

The St Mary's Story by Anthea Lang - an A4 sized paper back publication by Gateshead Council in July 2009. ISNB 0 901273 48 1

Priced at the amazing price of £4.99 it can of course be purchased from St Mary's Church, it is well worth making the visit to the Church just to have a look around both the building and its Churchyard. Also some fine views of Newcastle from St Mary's.

The book itself charts the full history of the Church which may well have been the site of a Monastery in AD653. Well written and supported by many drawings, paintings, photographs. The only negative I would have is the absence of a plan of the Church not being included within the book.







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