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Old April 20th, 2011, 08:33 PM   #101
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Stained glass window restoration complete
at St George’s Church, Jesmond

by David Whetstone, The Journal, April 19th 2011



ONE of the region’s finest stained glass windows can finally be seen in all its glory in time for Easter – but it nearly didn’t make it.

The £50,000 restoration of the west window at St George’s Church in Jesmond, Newcastle, revealed an “appalling” botch job made more than a century ago which suggests its survival has been close to a miracle.

The scaffolding came down yesterday in front of the window at St George’s, one of only three Victorian or Edwardian Grade I-listed churches in the region.

The vicar, the Rev Dr Nick Chamberlain, said: “The money for the restoration was raised by the congregation, from donations large and small, for which we’re very grateful.

“Also by the Friends of St George’s, an organisation for people who are interested in supporting the artistic heritage of the church.

“The stonework around the window was also cleaned by a team of volunteers using toothbrushes who put in a huge amount of time, for which we are also very grateful.”

Dr Chamberlain said a memory box containing volunteers’ names and toothbrushes had been hidden high up in the elaborate stonework.

“It hasn’t been cleaned for 100 years so hopefully it won’t be found and opened for another 100 years,” he said.



Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1K5M4cMal
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Old April 26th, 2011, 12:03 PM   #102
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Lets see if this catches anyone out

1. Where is this stained glass window?
2. What does it represent?

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Old April 26th, 2011, 09:05 PM   #103
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WilfBurnsFan View Post
Or the Company of Smiths:

http://www.freemenofnewcastle.org/
Yes unless you are a member of the SMITHS GUILD or have been into Blackfriar's during a Heritage Open Days Weekend you won't have seen this stained glass window, so apologies but it appears that the coat of arms has been sufficient for identification.

1. Where is this stained glass window - Answer : In the Smiths Hall at Blackfriars Dominican Monastery.
2. What does it represent - Answer : The Company of Smiths

The Smiths Guild still use Smiths Hall amongst other active Guilds - geographically Smiths Hall is on the right hand corner of the front of Blackfriars (South side).

This is the crest above the entrance door to Smiths Hall:



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Old April 30th, 2011, 10:00 PM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alf stone View Post
s. Recently I have been looking at the history of the Jewish settlement in Gateshead
Mr 'x' times great grandfather was Trytle Joel who founded the first synagogue in Newcastle [Thornton Street]. My reading is that in part the community in Gateshead flourished because the Newcastle community wasn't sufficiently 'orthodox'. I suspect you may have more on this than I do.
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Old April 30th, 2011, 10:25 PM   #105
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Yes, Newcastlepubs, the official version of the Gateshead settlement goes something like this:

the Gateshead settlement had been founded in 1881 by shopkeeper Zechariah Bernstone who ‘walked across the Redheugh bridge from Newcastle to Gateshead’ looking for a remote site to found a new orthodox Jewish community, due to his disappointment with what he considered to be the unacceptably low standards of Judaism he found in the bigger city.

But there are records of Jews settling individually in Gateshead at least 10 years before this including my Mr. Wilkes. It is still a thriving community and they have just done a land swap with Gateshead Council which will allow an extension to the synagogue for the first time since it was built.
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Old April 30th, 2011, 10:45 PM   #106
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alf stone View Post
Yes, Newcastlepubs, the official version of the Gateshead settlement goes something like this:

the Gateshead settlement had been founded in 1881 by shopkeeper Zechariah Bernstone who ‘walked across the Redheugh bridge from Newcastle to Gateshead’ looking for a remote site to found a new orthodox Jewish community, due to his disappointment with what he considered to be the unacceptably low standards of Judaism he found in the bigger city.

But there are records of Jews settling individually in Gateshead at least 10 years before this including my Mr. Wilkes. It is still a thriving community and they have just done a land swap with Gateshead Council which will allow an extension to the synagogue for the first time since it was built.
I ve a a pic of the Thornton Str synagogue [albeit after it was a synagogue]
image hosted on flickr


but I ve been trying to get hold of a pic of the inscribed stone [you can see it just at the top of the building] which I ve been told was shipped to Hazelrigg Cemetery after it was demolished. Don't suppose you have seen one ?
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Old May 4th, 2011, 12:15 AM   #107
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Here's a riddle for you all . . .
What part of Newcastle do we think is being discussed here:-

"No description can convey an idea of it; and accordingly, Ben Jonson amused himself by describing it as an enigma."

And this is part of that enigma, in rhyme:
My altitude high, my body four square,
My foot in the grave, my head in the air,
My eyes in my sides, five tongues in my womb,
Thirteen heads upon my body, four images alone


It would be nice to think that some on here might attempt to deduce this without 'Googling' for references! Clues available tomorrow if necc.
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Old May 4th, 2011, 03:51 PM   #108
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Here's that rhyme in full:
' My altitude high, my body four square,
' My foot in the grave, my head in the air,
' My eyes in my sides, five tongues in my womb,
' Thirteen heads upon my body, four images alone ;
' I can direct you where the wind doth stay,
' And I tune God's precepts twice a day.
' I am seen where I am not, I am heard where I is not,
' Tell me now what I am, and see that you miss not."
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Old May 4th, 2011, 06:18 PM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DXNewcastle View Post
Here's that rhyme in full:
' My altitude high, my body four square,
' My foot in the grave, my head in the air,
' My eyes in my sides, five tongues in my womb,
' Thirteen heads upon my body, four images alone ;
' I can direct you where the wind doth stay,
' And I tune God's precepts twice a day.
' I am seen where I am not, I am heard where I is not,
' Tell me now what I am, and see that you miss not."
Guess. St Nicholas Cathedral?
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Old May 4th, 2011, 07:13 PM   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham56 View Post
Guess. St Nicholas Cathedral?
Yes! Well done!
Here is the context of that rhyme, from Sykes' "Local Records or Historical Register of Remarkable Events" for the year 1359
Quote:
St Nicholas' church, in Newcastle, appears to have been rebuilt. It is 240 feet in length and 75 in breadth. The beautiful steeple of this church, which Mr. Pennant allows to be very justly the boast of the inhabitants, is in height about 194 feet, and, for its
peculiar excellency of design and delicacy of execution, is justly esteemed one of the finest specimens of architectural beauty in the world. It consists of a square tower, 40 feet in width, having great and small turrets, with pinnacles at the angles, and centre of each front of the tower. From the four turrets of the angles, spring two arches, which meet in an intersecting direction, and bear on their centre a perforated lantern, (illuminated anciently for the conduct of travellers), surmounted by a tall and beautiful spire ; the angles of the lantern have pinnacles similar to those on the turrets, and the whole of the pinnacles, being twelve in number, and the spire are ornamented with crockets and vanes. The following is an extract of a letter from that celebrated orientalist, the late Rev. J. D. Carlyle, vicar of Newcastle, to the churchwardens of St. Newcastle:-

" The steeple of St. Nicholas, is a fabric, in my opinion, the
most beautiful that exists in the world, which surpasses the
cathedral of St. Sophia, at Constantinople, the Mosque of Sultan
Saladin, at Jerusalem, the church of St. Peter, at Rome, and
even the Temple of Minerva, at Athens." I shall close the
account of this very elegant erection with an extract from a "Tour
in England and Scotland by a Foreigner, 1825." "Among all the
religious monuments of Newcastle, the belfry of St. Nicholas'
church is one of the most singular creations of Gothic architec-
ture. No description can convey an idea of it ; and accordingly
Ben Jonson amused himself by describing it as an enigma. It is
surmounted by a kind of tiara, formed by the intersection at right
angles of four arcs of a circle, supporting a turret, which is trans-
pierced by sculpture, and which is crowned by a pinnacle of a
perfectly original character."
You wouldn't expect to read a description of St.Nicholas' in language like that nowadays!
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Old May 4th, 2011, 09:12 PM   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DXNewcastle View Post
Yes! Well done!
Here is the context of that rhyme, from Sykes' "Local Records or Historical Register of Remarkable Events" for the year 1359You wouldn't expect to read a description of St.Nicholas' in language like that nowadays!
Any chance of someone explaining what the 'rhyme' is meant to represent - a step by step guide for an old man would be helpfull
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Old May 4th, 2011, 10:22 PM   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Any chance of someone explaining what the 'rhyme' is meant to represent - a step by step guide for an old man would be helpfull
You ask for too much!

The first two lines are a strong hint that its a tall building (high altitude & four-square):
' My altitude high, my body four square,

and that it might be a church (grave-stones beneath and exceptionally tall)
' My foot in the grave, my head in the air,

The next line is lost on me, tho' its 'eyes' are likely just to be its windows :
' My eyes in my sides, five tongues in my womb,

The thirteen heads are the 13 pinacles (described in the quote from 'the Foreigner') and which have a symmetry, in which the spire is identical from 4 sides :
' Thirteen heads upon my body, four images alone ;

The weather vane is obvious (but only narrows it down when we know how old it is) :
' I can direct you where the wind doth stay,

Surely this refers to the Bell announcing matins & vespers (or similar twice-daily services) :
' And I tune God's precepts twice a day.

And we can guess that this refers to the cathedral spires being seen and its bell heard from far away :
' I am seen where I am not, I am heard where I is not,
' Tell me now what I am, and see that you miss not."

Here's the illustration from Sykes' 1833 book:-


and another from a later addenum to Sykes by Fordyce in 1867, where he notes that on 1st May 1834 "The church of St. Nicholas had a new north porch
and buttresses erected, to correspond with those on the south.
":-

Caption : 'From Groat Market, with foot of Middle-street, the site of the latter now occupied by the Town Hall Buildings.'

I'm afraid that that's about as much as I can work out!

Last edited by DXNewcastle; June 29th, 2013 at 05:26 PM. Reason: changed URL
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Old May 5th, 2011, 11:54 AM   #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DXNewcastle View Post
You ask for too much!


The next line is lost on me, tho' its 'eyes' are likely just to be its windows :
' My eyes in my sides, five tongues in my womb,

The thirteen heads are the 13 pinacles (described in the quote from 'the Foreigner') and which have a symmetry, in which the spire is identical from 4 sides :
' Thirteen heads upon my body, four images alone ;

I'm afraid that that's about as much as I can work out!
Thanks for that

Quote:
The next line is lost on me, tho' its 'eyes' are likely just to be its windows :
' My eyes in my sides, five tongues in my womb,
I wonder if this relates to the Belfry - it has two light windows on each side. Perhaps at the time the rhyme was written there were only 5 bells (compared the present 13) - being the tongues?

Quote:
four images alone
Must get the telephoto onto the Cathedral to see if I can spot the four images "one at each corner cut at length in stone"
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Old May 5th, 2011, 02:05 PM   #114
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St Nicholas's Cathedral

The recent discussion on Ben Jonson's rhythm had me reaching for a couple of book I have for The Cathedral Church of Saint Nicholas, so thought I would scan some pages:

The first one is a small pocket sized paperbacked publication, dating from 1932 and published by the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne. Running to 38 pages it is written by Mr Thomas Wake who was one of the Curators of the Antiquarians. The booklet covers the full history of the Church and Cathedral with some fine sketches of notable feautures.









The second book is one which is on sale within the Cathedral itself and is ideal to use in a tour of the building as it gives a lot of information on the notable features of the Cathedral. A paperback, slightly larger than A5 and running to 22 pages. Published by Jarrold Publishing, photographs by Neil Jinkerson and text by David Lovie.
Some great photographs in the booklet, well lit, which anyone who has been in the rather dark building will appreciate.







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Old May 5th, 2011, 03:33 PM   #115
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Excellent books on The Cathedral Church of St Nicholas, Steve.

My own personal favourite book about the Cathedral has always been the first one you reviewed, the 1932 book by the Society of Antiquaries.

So, in the interests of 'completeness', and so that all books about St Nicholas Cathedral (that we have) are catalogued on here together, I have two other books on the subject, that I will now show . .


1 - The Cathedral Church of St Nicholas, Newcastle upon Tyne.
J W Stafford
Jarrold Colour Publications
1986.

This first one is effectively an 'earlier version' published by Jarrold Colour Publications, of the second book shown by Steve Ellwood in the previous post, as it is the 1986 version of the visitors guide that was on sale in the Cathedral itself . . .




The Interior of the Cathedral, looking East . .



The High Altar . .







The second book is classed as a 'short guide' to the Cathedral, but is actually quite a detailed guide, with a good narrative and excellent photos, and runs to some 32 'roughly A5' size pages . .

2 - A Short Guide to the Cathedral Church of St Nicholas.
Hugh Robert Clelland (Senior Warden)
J & P Bealls Ltd
1972.












.
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Old May 5th, 2011, 04:39 PM   #116
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Perhaps I can add to the St.Nicholas' story by quoting some extracts from John Sykes' "Historical Register of Remarkable Events" which relate to the Church? Published by T.Fordyce 1866, this book is now long out of Copyright. These are in the form of a chronology.

1091. St. Nicholas' church, in Newcastle, appears to have been founded this year by Osmond, bishop of Salisbury.

1216 This year, St. Nicholas' church, in Newcastle, appears to have suffered by fire.

1280. The justices itinerant held their courts in the churches of St. Nicholas and St. Andrew, in Newcastle.

1359. St Nicholas' church, in Newcastle, appears to have been rebuilt. It is 240 feet in length and 75 in breadth. The beautiful steeple of this church, which Mr. Pennant allows to be very justly the boast of the inhabitants, is in height about 194 feet, and, for its peculiar excellency of design and delicacy of execution, is justly esteemed one of the finest specimens of architectural beauty in the world.

1474. Robert Rodes presented a cross of gold to the shrine of St. Cuthbert, at Durham. He was steward to the prior and convent of Durham, and enjoyed the fraternity of that church. It is generally thought that the upper part of St. Nicholas' steeple is a superstructure, and that it was raised upon the original tower, by Robert Rodes. On the arch of the belfry of this steeple, there are four shields, with the arms of Rodes, and an inscription as follows :
Grate pro Anima Roberti Rodes
The font of this church seems to have been made or repaired at the expense of Robert Rodes, as his coat of arms and another (probably his wife's) are sculptured on it. The canopy of this font is of most elegant workmanship. There are also five shields on the roof of this church, with the arras of Rodes.

1608. This year, about ten feet of the centre or highest spire of St. Nicholas' church, in Newcastle, was taken down and rebuilt. The corporation have been charged with the reparation of this steeple from time immemorial.

1676. About this time the corporation of Newcastle contributed £300 towards the erection of the present organ in St. Nicholas' church, in that town. They added a trumpet stop in 1699, and in 1710, paid £200 for finishing the back front, and cleaning and repairing the whole instrument. The swell was ordered by the common-council in 1749, and which it is supposed was added by Sneizler, the celebrated organ builder.

1754 (Feb. 1). Was rung, at St. Nicholas' church, in Newcastle, by the young society of ringers, 2520 changes of bob triples, in one hour and thirty-six minutes, being half the complete peal, which had never been performed there before, it being thought impossible for any society of ringers to complete the whole peal on these bells, by reason of the bad hanging.

April 10. A complete peal of bob triples, consisting of 5,040 changes, was rung in three hours, thirteen minutes, and a quarter, on the bells of St. Nicholas, in Newcastle. The above number of changes had not been rung there before, on account of the bad hanging of the bells. The magistrates, finding the deficiency, sent for Mr. Lawrence, a noted bell hanger of London, who hung them so effectually, that the peal was rung through with the greatest ease, considering the weight of the tenor bell, which had recently been recast.

1761 (October). A new clock, with chimes, was made by Mr. Walker, in the Close, Newcastle, which was put up in St. Nicholas' Church, and greatly admired, and by good judges was esteemed an excellent piece of workmanship.

1769 June 9. St. Nicholas' church, in Newcastle, was undergoing very extensive repairs. It was opened again for divine service on Sunday, September 24th, the same year.

1771 July 21. Notice was given that there would be no service in St. Nicholas' church, Newcastle, on this day (Sunday), as a part of the west end had been taken down, and it was rebuilding.

1783 This year, a subscription was commenced, which, in a short time,
amounted to a large sum, for the purpose of converting St. Nicholas' Church, in Newcastle, into a sort of cathedral, but the curious will ever regret the change, as by it nearly all the fine old funeral monuments, &c., were destroyed.

1785 June 12. The church of St. Nicholas, Newcastle, after undergoing great alterations, was opened for divine service.

1788 August 28. Thomas Morton, one of the guards of the Royal Mail-coach, undertook, for a considerable wager, to throw a stone over the highest vane of the steeple of St. Nicholas' church, in Newcastle, which he acccomplished with ease at the fourth throw, the stone being seen several feet above the highest pinnacle of the steeple, which is 194 feet high.

(Some of these dates and reports may subsequently have been 'improved' upon by others)
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Old May 10th, 2011, 12:00 PM   #117
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.
This Project has been fully covered on THIS thread, mainly by 'Stamford', with some great photos throughout the carrying out of the works.

Below is an article about it from 'The Journal' of 10th May 2011. It (at the time I uploaded it) did not include a photo within its on-line version, so I have inserted one of Stamfords . . .


New attraction at Newcastle's St Nicholas Cathedral
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, May 10th 2011



A VENTURE which brings star quality to a key city centre site will be dedicated this week.

A £215,000 pocket park and new public square has been created in front of the north door of St Nicholas Cathedral in Newcastle.

The centrepiece of the project is a star burst picked out in granite against the Caithness stone of the square.

Tom Robinson, of Robinson Landscape Design, based at Cathedral Buildings in Dean Street in Newcastle, came up with the star idea.

He based the concept on the fact that St Nicholas is the patron saint of mariners and that the cathedral’s lantern tower echoes this.

“On high days and holidays they would have lit a lantern in the form of a brazier in the tower,” said Mr Robinson.

“The star burst of light is like a lighthouse or beacon.”

The square replaces a raised plinth which formed a barrier between Mosley Street and the cathedral.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1LvyMaH9q
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Old May 10th, 2011, 12:39 PM   #118
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Jewish Newcastle

Although not Jewish myself. I recently discovered that the house I grew up in was built on the site of a former synagogue in Gloucester Street, Elswick. Does anyone have any information or photographs of this perhaps.

Also St John's Cemetery in Elswick has a huge Jewish section, this would seem to indicate there was once a large Jewish population in that area. Again any information would be welcome.

Ta very much.
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Old May 10th, 2011, 01:10 PM   #119
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The first synagogue in Newcastle was on Thornton street [founded by my X tim es great grandfather]. He is buried in the Jewish section of Elswick cemetery. There was certainly a Jewish community in Newcastle before that; Silver Street on Quayside was one specific area [known as Jew Street]. The community was expelled in the mid 13th century. The modern community dates to the late 18th century.

My reading is that in the early to mid 19th century was that there were not particularly concentrated communities [save for families being close together]. I ve certainly not come across Elswick as being a particularly 'jewish' area. I suspect that the burials are simply as a result of there being a jewish section as there are with other cemeteries in the area.

I can't find anything on a synagogue on Gloucester Street:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JCR-UK/england_geographic.htm

This lists pretty much everything in the area.
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Old May 10th, 2011, 01:13 PM   #120
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There are a few photos of (old) Gloucester Street here . . .

http://www.flickr.com/search/?ss=2&w...+street&m=text

The photos there appear to include . . .

1 - A Christian Mission Hall
2 - A Catholic Apostolic Church
and
3 - A Baptist Church

. . . but nothing that says it is a former synagogue.

We may have discussed this previously on this forum, and the best place to start (if you have not already) is via the posts linked from (and those other posts 'around' where those links take you) the JEWISH RELIGIOUS PLACES IN NEWCASTLE section, on the 'Index Thread'.

You could also try under Gloucester Road, for mentions of 'Gloucester Street'.
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