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Old November 5th, 2009, 12:58 PM   #1
Newcastle Historian
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AT RISK REGISTER - English Heritage At Risk Register in Newcastle and the North East

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This thread is solely for discussions about the ENGLISH HERITAGE AT RISK REGISTER, in relation to buildings in Newcastle and the North East.

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Old November 19th, 2009, 12:47 PM   #2
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English Heritage’s 2009 at risk register revealed 82 Grade I and II* buildings at risk of decay or neglect in the North East.



Quote:
Cuts may put iconic Armstrong building in danger
CUTS to university funding could leave one of Newcastle’s most iconic building under threat.

Government ministers have ordered big cuts in the higher education budget which will see up to £180m taken out of a national £8bn university cash pot.

As a result Newcastle University has been told it is likely to lose the £1.3m normally handed over each year to be spent on preserving the famous Armstrong building.

It follows a cash raid last year which saw some £800,000 diverted away from the university. Changes forced onto the Higher Education Funding Council by the Government will also see around £240,000 taken from Newcastle University’s post-graduate pot.

Last night there were claims further funding cuts could still be made to the region’s leading university.

Professor Tony Stevenson, Pro-Vice-Chancellor, said the money for historic building maintenance would be taken from the 2010 to 2011 budget.

He said: “The money we have will have to be spread much further. In a sense the victims will be those universities lucky enough to have these old buildings. We’re about ninth in the list, so we’re far from the worst-hit university under these changes.

“But there is still the possibility of further cuts to come as well.”

The Grade II-listed building formed the original Armstrong College, founded in 1871, then part of Durham University. It eventually became eventually became Newcastle University in 1963.

While it is well maintained and in daily use at the university, the region has dozens of other listed buildings which have been less lucky.

English Heritage’s 2009 at risk register revealed 82 Grade I and II* buildings at risk of decay or neglect in the North East.

Across the region heritage funding was down by 35% for the financial year 2008-09 as cash was diverted to pay for the Olympics and changes were made to the way lottery cash is handed out. Philip Walker, head of corporate communications at the Higher Education Funding Council said the changes were part of ongoing efficiency savings.

He said the funding for old buildings was part of the teaching funding stream and would be harder to justify at a time when the organisation was looking to make savings elsewhere.

Maintaining the grant, the council said, would be unreasonable as it would have to come at the expense of other priorities.

Mr Walker added the council made “significant capital investments” to universities to help them maintain their estates.

A consultation on the changes ended in October and the council expects to be able to discuss the findings before the end of the month.
http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...1634-25202650/

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Old November 19th, 2009, 02:24 PM   #3
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The Armstrong Building is a key part of probably the most 'iconic' area within the entire Newcastle University Campus . . . The Quadrangle.



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Old November 19th, 2009, 06:50 PM   #4
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"Across the region heritage funding was down by 35% for the financial year 2008-09 as cash was diverted to pay for the Olympics"
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Old January 18th, 2010, 11:42 PM   #5
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Quote:
Tyneside Station gets £500K more cash for restoration
A Victorian station on North Tyneside has been given a further cash injection of £500,000.

The grant, from English Heritage, will go towards the restoration of the ornate canopy at Tynemouth Station.

It brings the amount awarded by English Heritage to £1m and comes on top of a recent £2m government Sea Change grant.

Grade II-listed Tynemouth Station opened in 1882 and was once described as one of the finest in the country, but is now on the "at risk" register.

Morris Muter, from the station owner's Station Developments Ltd, said: "This latest grant offer from English Heritage is most welcome and will be instrumental in filling a funding gap.

"I look forward to working with them and the other members of the project team in order to ensure delivery of the restoration and conservation scheme."

Carol Pyrah, from English Heritage, said: "Tynemouth Station is one of the highest priority buildings at risk in the region.

"The large grant we have offered is testament to the significance of the building and the urgency of repairs needed to the extensive iron canopies."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/tyne/8466365.stm
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Old June 9th, 2010, 11:44 AM   #6
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Link showing Bolam Coyne on the 'At Risk Register' on English Heritage website. Sad to see that the Keelman Hospital and 4 Eldon Square (both local authority) are also on the list...
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Old July 8th, 2010, 10:28 AM   #7
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Grant means Tyne Theatre can look to the future
July 8th 2010, by Tony Henderson, The Journal


The Victorian Journal Tyne Theatre is now off the at-risk register in what is a milestone step towards securing the future of the building.

Three years ago the Tyne Theatre and Opera House Preservation Trust took over the building in Westgate Road, which is leased to operators SMG Europe. With the help of a grant of £105,000 from English Heritage and backing from the city council, the trust has carried out repair work on the roof and drainage system.

It has also restored the proscenium arch.

Brian Debnam of the Tyne Theatre and Opera House Preservation Trust, said: "The theatre is a unique and important building and we have managed to protect and weatherproof the fabric of the building which will prolong its continuing use as a vibrant centre for entertainment in the centre of Newcastle."

But he said that major investment would be needed in the next five to 10 years to maintain the building as a working theatre. This would include the complete refurbishment of the auditorium and the installation of lifts.

There are also long-term plans to open an exhibition centre on the history of the building and theatre architecture in Newcastle.


ARTICLE HERE - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...34-26808244/2/
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Old March 30th, 2011, 04:46 PM   #8
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English Heritage At Risk Register

English Heritage At Risk Register

English Heritage are currently updating their At Risk Register and will be producing the results in October 2011 - see http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/c...itage-at-risk/

I took the opportunity to look at their list for Newcastle City Centre buildings and was surprised to see the inclusion of:

West Front of Grainger Market - http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...crit=newcastle

Quote:
Shops and houses forming west front of covered market built in 1835 by John Dobson for Richard Grainger. Number 43 Clayton Street is on a corner site adjoining Number 1 Nun Street, and appears structurally sound but is in a poor state of repair, with evidence of stone damage and decay on the main facade. Ground floor in use but upper floors used for storage or vacant.
5-13 Grey Street - http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...crit=newcastle

Quote:
Four-storey shops and houses (now offices) built circa 1835, probably by John Wardle for Richard Grainger. The property is now largely vacant and starting to show signs of a lack of maintenance; including extensive water-staining below the top cornice of the front elevation
4 Eldon Square- http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...crit=newcastle

Quote:
Four-storey town house built 1825-31 by Thomas Oliver and John Dobson for Richard Grainger (one of his earliest enterprises and preludes his ambitious remodelling of Newcastle's town centre, which began in 1834). Last occupied as shops but now largely disused. The vacant nature of the building makes it highly vulnerable and there are signs of a lack of maintenance.
The Keelmen's Hospital - http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...crit=newcastle

Quote:
Almshouses constructed in 1701 for keelmen and keelmen's widows. The building was last used as student accommodation but is now vacant and disused. There are signs of water ingress and the building is a target for vandalism.
55 and 57 Westgate Road - http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...crit=newcastle

Quote:
House of circa 1750 which was an art shop before becoming vacant. The interior, which contains high-quality plasterwork, needed restoration and repair after some vandalism and neglect. English Heritage offered a grant towards a package of urgent repair works that commenced in 2008 and were completed in 2009. However, no end use has been identified for the building, which remains vacant.
Whilst all of the above give concern, I was quite shocked to read about the Keelman's Hospital, especially given the recent arson attack at the Barley Mow.

Worrying times.
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Old March 30th, 2011, 04:55 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
English Heritage At Risk Register

English Heritage are currently updating their At Risk Register and will be producing the results in October 2011
see http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/c...itage-at-risk/

I took the opportunity to look at their list for Newcastle City Centre buildings and was surprised to see the inclusion of:

5-13 Grey Street - http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...crit=newcastle

This one (above) is the specific site (5-13 Grey Street) of the proposed 'Grey Street Hotel', thread here . . .

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1345823

So (hopefully) that will take care of one of the 'at risk' buildings, in the forseeable future.
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Old March 30th, 2011, 09:17 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Whilst all of the above give concern, I was quite shocked to read about the Keelman's Hospital, especially given the recent arson attack at the Barley Mow.

Worrying times.
I lived in Keelmen's twenty-odd years ago with a lass who was a student at Newcastle Polytechnic. I may be wrong, but I believe the building was owned by the council and leased to the Poly as student accommodation.

It was a great place to live - the flats themselves were of a reasonable quality and all self-contained, dead handy for the Quayside and town, and were built around a large, grassed quadrangle that was perfect for chilling and socialising in the summer. But since the Poly moved out the the whole building has been allowed to disintegrate.

So I've always been baffled as to why they didn't continue to be used by the council as housing, or were developed by someone else. I think would be prohibitively expensive now, given the state the building has become.

Its future is very bleak.
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Old April 1st, 2011, 11:16 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
English Heritage At Risk Register

English Heritage are currently updating their At Risk Register and will be producing the results in October 2011.

See http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/c...itage-at-risk/

The Keelmen's Hospital - http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...crit=newcastle

I was quite shocked to read about the Keelman's Hospital, especially given the recent arson attack at the Barley Mow.

Worrying times.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Reetson View Post
I lived in Keelmen's twenty-odd years ago with a lass who was a student at Newcastle Polytechnic. I may be wrong, but I believe the building was owned by the council and leased to the Poly as student accommodation.

It was a great place to live - the flats themselves were of a reasonable quality and all self-contained, dead handy for the Quayside and town, and were built around a large, grassed quadrangle that was perfect for chilling and socialising in the summer. But since the Poly moved out the the whole building has been allowed to disintegrate.

So I've always been baffled as to why they didn't continue to be used by the council as housing, or were developed by someone else. I think would be prohibitively expensive now, given the state the building has become.

Its future is very bleak.

The Keelmen's Hospital - a great building, well worth saving . . .


Circa 1800 . .




Circa 1880 . .




1961 . .




1970 . .




1980 . .





All PHOTOS courtesy of "Newcastle City Council / City Libraries PHOTOSTREAM" - http://www.flickr.com/search/[email protected]&q=Keelmans

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Old April 1st, 2011, 11:47 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
The Keelmen's Hospital - a great building, well worth saving . . .
Surely we are better educated these days and know why we need to safeguard our heritage - I just cannot imagine that the Keelman's would be allowed to decay and be demolished
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Old October 19th, 2011, 10:11 AM   #13
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Historic North East industrial sites
are at risk say English Heritage

by Tony Henderson, The Journal, October 19th 2011


MORE than 30 historic sites which helped make the North East an industrial powerhouse are now at risk, it is revealed today. English Heritage released the findings of the largest research project into the condition of England’s industrial heritage together with its annual Heritage at risk register. It reveals 12.2% of the North East’s heritage at risk is industrial – proportionately the highest in the country.

The regional findings were launched at one of the at risk sites – the Bowes Railway at Springwell. The world’s only working and best preserved rope-hauled railway, Bowes was built by George Stephenson in 1826 and transported coal from the Durham coalfields to the Tyne.

Carol Pyrah, North East planning director at English Heritage, said: “Britain led the way in global industrialisation and as a result we are custodians of the world’s most important industrial heritage. It is, however, one of the elements of our heritage most at risk.

“In particular, working sites such as Bowes are facing real challenges up and down the country.

Industrial sites which have come off the at risk list in the last year include Shildon Engine House near Blanchland in Northumberland, one of the earliest steam engine houses in the North East and which was repaired last year with English Heritage grant aid.

Also off the register is Low Slit lead mine near Westgate in Weardale a scheduled ancient monument, which was active in medieval times and was last in operation in the 19th Century.

Many people aren’t aware we have this internationally important industrial heritage


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1bDGygEJE
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Old March 2nd, 2012, 10:06 AM   #14
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Spectacular future planned for Dunston Staithes
by Tony Henderson, The Journal March 2nd 2012


A MONUMENT to North East industry could find a new life as a spectacular feature of a popular riverside cycle and walkway. Consultants have completed three days of inspection – partly by boat – of the 1,709ft long Dunston Staithes on the Tyne at Gateshead, which are believed to be the largest wooden structure in Northern Europe.

The staithes, which opened in 1893 and closed almost a century later, is a listed structure and also a scheduled monument, but after more than 30 years of lying idle and having suffered two fires, it is now on English Heritage’s At-Risk register. The organisation is working with owners Tyne & Wear Building Preservation Trust and Gateshead Council on how the staithes can be preserved.

Martin Hulse, trust secretary, said it was hoped that public access could be created to the staithes, which offers sweeping views along the river. The aim is to make the structure a major asset to the growing community of Taylor Wimpey’s Staiths South Bank housing development and users of the riverside Keelman’ s Way cycle route. This runs from Gateshead’s borders with South Tyneside at Bill Quay through Swalwell and Ryton to Wylam in Northumberland.

The idea is for the staithes to be an exciting detour from the cycleway. “Hundreds of people enjoy cycling and walking this route and the views from the top of the staithes are beautiful. To open the staithes again is my dream,” Martin added.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1nwrtziSz
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Old July 3rd, 2012, 10:09 AM   #15
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Princess Anne re-opens Tynemouth Station
by Sonia Sharma, The Journal, July 3rd 2012


A HISTORIC railway station has been given the royal seal of approval after a £3.6m facelift. Princess Anne, the Princess Royal, unveiled a plaque at Tynemouth Station yesterday to celebrate the completion of a major restoration project at the Grade II* listed structure. The station, opened by the North Eastern Railway in 1882 and now part of the Tyne and Wear Metro, was on the English Heritage buildings at risk register for years but has undergone extensive work which has seen its distinctive glazed canopies restored.

Princess Anne toured the new-look station and spoke to groups involved in the project, congratulating the teams for their efforts before meeting schoolchildren and market traders. Krystyna Dodds and Ian Jones, who run the Curiously Wicked handmade chocolate business in Morpeth and also trade from Tynemouth Market once a month, gave the Princess a chocolate shoe.

The 130-year-old station was revamped thanks to funding from North Tyneside Council, Station Developments Ltd, English Heritage and Nexus. Around £1.9m also came from the Government’s Sea Change programme. More than 4,600 glass panes were installed in the canopies and around 2,400 litres of paint were used during the refurbishment. As well as being a working Metro station and home to the weekend Tynemouth Market, the site aims to provide an all-year venue for exhibitions, heritage events, fairs and festivals.

The work has been supported by groups including The Friends of Tynemouth Station and Tynemouth Village Association.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1zXpmDQyt

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Old December 17th, 2012, 10:15 PM   #16
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Church of All Saints has been placed on the at risk register:

Quote:
Built between 1786-96 by David Stephenson to replace a medieval church on the same site. Classical style, with baroque tower. All Saints was closed by the Church of England in 1961 and the building was subsequently used as an urban studies centre and concert hall; however, it has been reused for worship in recent years by the Church of St Wilibrord. Staining to stonework around rainwater goods indicates leaks and there is evidence of spalling of high level stonework. The building has been a victim of heritage crime.
http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...type=all&crit=

Numerous other religious buildings but this one being the most high profile.
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Old January 13th, 2013, 07:50 PM   #17
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English Heritage North East at Risk Register

Quote:
Originally Posted by Squipper View Post
Current 'At Risk' list:

Newcastle:

All Saints Church
Church of St Michael with St Lawrence in Byker
Church of St James, Benwell
Life Transformation Church (formerly St Paul's) High Elswick
5-13 Grey Street
4 Eldon Square
Keelmans Hospital
Woolsington Hall
Clifford's Fort North Shields
Dewly Hill Round Barrow (SAM)
Sallyport Tower and associated city walls (SAM)
St. Peter's conservation area, Wallsend.


Gateshead:

Bowes Incline
Dunston Staithes
Washingwells Roman Fort, Whickham (SAM)
Dunston Hill mining remains and cuttings (SAM)
Ravensworth coalmill remains (SAM)
Ravensworth castle
Ravensworth Nash House
Gibside Hall
Whinfield coking ovens, Whickham
Battlefield, Newburn Ford at Ryton
Cleadon chimney, Boldon.
Christchurch, Jarrow
Marsden lime kilns, South Shields

Steve


Take a look at the English Heritage North East at Risk Register and its bound to make you weep - http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/p...ister-2012.pdf
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Old January 13th, 2013, 08:27 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Take a loo at the English Heritage North East at Risk Register and its bound to make you weep - http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/p...ister-2012.pdf
my house backs on to st michaels church in byker, the yard has had a lot of work done and has probably one of the best views of newcastle and gateshead, but the building itself is in an awful state, its often broken into and vandalised so really it needs something done asap i just cant see what it could be used for other than a church in its location especially when the community centre is just around the corner
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Old January 13th, 2013, 09:52 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squipper View Post
Current 'At Risk' list:

Newcastle:

All Saints Church
Church of St Michael with St Lawrence in Byker
Church of St James, Benwell
Life Transformation Church (formerly St Paul's) High Elswick
5-13 Grey Street
4 Eldon Square
Keelmans Hospital
Woolsington Hall
Clifford's Fort North Shields
Dewly Hill Round Barrow (SAM)
Sallyport Tower and associated city walls (SAM)
St. Peter's conservation area, Wallsend.


Gateshead:

Bowes Incline
Dunston Staithes
Washingwells Roman Fort, Whickham (SAM)
Dunston Hill mining remains and cuttings (SAM)
Ravensworth coalmill remains (SAM)
Ravensworth castle
Ravensworth Nash House
Gibside Hall
Whinfield coking ovens, Whickham
Battlefield, Newburn Ford at Ryton
Cleadon chimney, Boldon.
Christchurch, Jarrow
Marsden lime kilns, South Shields

Steve

Surprised re Sallyport Tower, that s quite close to me and have also had cause to meet with the occupants inside a few times.

It's not original but it seems to be in pretty good nick [save for the concrete floor and school type bogs at the western edge]. Can't comment from a conservation perspective but seems 'cared for'.
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Old January 14th, 2013, 10:30 AM   #20
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Surprised re Sallyport Tower, that s quite close to me and have also had cause to meet with the occupants inside a few times.

It's not original but it seems to be in pretty good nick [save for the concrete floor and school type bogs at the western edge]. Can't comment from a conservation perspective but seems 'cared for'.
I was around there in the summer and was surprised at the large mass of weeds that had been allowed to grow in the grounds of the Tower. Structurally, to a lay person it looked ok.

More worrying is the Keelmans Hospital
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