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Old January 14th, 2013, 07:30 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newcastlepubs View Post
Surprised re Sallyport Tower, that s quite close to me and have also had cause to meet with the occupants inside a few times.

It's not original but it seems to be in pretty good nick [save for the concrete floor and school type bogs at the western edge]. Can't comment from a conservation perspective but seems 'cared for'.
This is the entry:

[IMG]http://i48.************/11b6gdh.png[/IMG]
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Old April 9th, 2013, 10:53 AM   #22
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Double funding boost to preserve Dunston Staithes
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, April 9th 2013



THE drive to secure the future of one of the North East’s greatest industrial monuments slipped into gear yesterday with a double funding boost. Dunston Staithes, in Gateshead, opened in 1893 and closed almost a century later, is listed and a scheduled monument. The 520m (1,709ft)-long staithes, believed to be the largest wooden structure in Northern Europe, played a crucial role in the transport from the Tyne of millions of tons of North East coal, but it has been steadily deteriorating after suffering two major fires and is on English Heritage’s At Risk register.

Now the target of bringing the monument back into public use is nearer following crucial support from English Heritage and the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF). English Heritage has offered Tyne and Wear Building Preservation Trust, which owns Dunston Staithes, a grant of £176,819 to carry out investigative works and repairs to the first six bays of the structure. This would test out techniques that can be used in the rest of the monument. Work is likely to start early next year.

The trust has also been awarded initial support from the HLF of a development grant of £48,200. this will allow the trust to develop project plans which aim to bring the first 38 bays into public use and link them to the Keelmans Way cycle route and also one of the few remaining areas of saltmarsh in the Tyne area. Of significant conservation interest, the mudflats, which were naturally created when the staithes closed and dredging ceased, provide a roosting area for bird species, including grey heron, lapwing and redshank.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz2PxEPEDUL
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Old June 2nd, 2013, 03:57 PM   #23
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All Saints Church

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Originally Posted by Squipper View Post
All Saints appears to have been removed from the 'At Risk' register.
Not the view of English Heritage Steve - check out http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...type=all&crit=

"Church of All Saints, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear

Built between 1786-96 by David Stephenson to replace a medieval church on the same site. Classical style, with baroque tower. All Saints was closed by the Church of England in 1961 and the building was subsequently used as an urban studies centre and concert hall; however, it has been reused for worship in recent years by the Church of St Wilibrord. Staining to stonework around rainwater goods indicates leaks and there is evidence of spalling of high level stonework. The building has been a victim of heritage crime.

[Church of All Saints, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear]

Asset Type: Place of Worship at Risk

Name: Church of All Saints
Street: Pilgrim Street
District/London Borough: Newcastle upon Tyne
County: Tyne and Wear
Parliamentary Constituency: Newcastle upon Tyne East
Region: North East
Postcode: NE1 3HA
Designation: Grade I listed building
Conservation Area: CA
List Entry Number: 1106329
Condition: Poor
Priority Category: C
Previous Priority Category: C
New Entry: No
Owner Type: Religious organisation
Contact: Principal Heritage at Risk Adviser 0191 269 1200"
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Old August 12th, 2013, 12:00 PM   #24
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Tynemouth Station saviour's surprise celebration

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...ration-5698498

Tynemouth Station saviour's surprise celebration

By Tony Henderson - 12th August 2013


Ylana First, organiser of the Book Fair at Tynemouth Metro train station

Booksellers yesterday celebrated a happy ending to a story which began more than 30 years ago.

It was then that Ylana First took up the fight to save the 1882 Tynemouth Station, which was facing the threat of being reduced to a Metro halt.

Ylana helped set up the Friends of Tynemouth Station and is still the organisation’s secretary. She was a driving force in the long battle to have the listed station and its expanse of ornate, glazed cast iron canopies restored.

She also organised book fairs at the station to highlight how it could be used for events and to raise funds for the Friends’ fight.

Yesterday was the 20th anniversary of the first book fair and around 50 booksellers sprang a surprise for Ylana.

To mark the anniversary, and Ylana’s recent 80th birthday, she was presented with an inscribed stone book sculpture, created by bookseller and stone mason Gert van Hoff. Cullercoats community choir Making Waves also sang Happy Birthday to Ylana, who lives in Tynemouth.

Also thanked was Ylana’s “right hand man” Ken Rowley, from North Shields.

Ylana also began the art displays on the station’s bridge, and has organised 45 exhibitions so far.

The station’s restoration, completed last year, has won it a hatful of awards and it has now been taken off English Heritage’s At Risk register.

It now provides an impressive gateway to the North Tyneside coast and is the venue for weekend markets and many other events, while also fulfilling its transport role.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...ration-5698498
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Old October 10th, 2013, 02:26 PM   #25
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Work pays off as Clifford's Fort in North Shields taken off at-risk list

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...-north-6165619

Work pays off as Clifford's Fort in North Shields taken off at-risk list
By Sarah Scott - 10th October 2013


Grade II listed Ushaw Home Farm in County Durham has been added to the Heritage at Risk register

A North East 17th century gun battery has been removed from an ‘at-risk’ heritage list.

Clifford’s Fort in North Shields, North Tyneside, is no longer on the English Heritage at Risk Register.

The announcement comes as officials from English Heritage revealed the 299 historic buildings and places in the region on the Heritage at Risk register for 2013.

Also removed from the list is 4 Eldon Square in Newcastle, a four-storey town house built between 1825-31 by Thomas Oliver and John Dobson for Richard Grainger.

Other changes this year mean Ushaw Home Farm in County Durham has been added to the register. The Grade II* listed farm, disused since 2002, has been added to the register because of concerns for its future.

Kate Wilson, Heritage at Risk principal Aaviser for the North East, said: “With our new dedicated Heritage at Risk team we have been able to get a number of challenging projects underway this year, supported by local authorities and partners like Natural England and the Heritage Lottery Fund.

“Many of these projects would not be possible if it was not for the hard work of local community groups and volunteers who have highlighted problems in their areas and come forward to help at a time when resources are increasingly scarce to tackle issues such as neglect and vandalism.

“At the same time many long-standing Heritage at Risk assets are finally coming off the register and we can all celebrate the results of years of hard work to bring these projects to fruition.”
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Old December 22nd, 2013, 09:24 PM   #26
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Not sure of the best place for this but the 28days later team have been digging around Woolsington Hall.


Quote:
Woolsington Hall was the seat of the Bell family, landowners in Dinnington. In 1828 Matthew Bell, MP for Northumberland and Deputy Lieutenant of Northumberland was listed as living at the hall.[3] All four battalions of the 103rd (Tyneside Irish) Brigade camped briefly at Woolsington Hall in May 1915. Conditions were bad at Woolsington Hall that many soldiers who lived locally went home rather than stay there.[4] The brigade trained in trench fighting at nearby Ponteland, and paraded through Newcastle city centre before departing from Woolsington for Salisbury Plain.[5]
Woolsington Hall was bought by businessman Sir John Hall's Cameron Hall Developments for £1.32 million in 1994. Since 1994 Hall has proposed several developments of the Woolsington site including a football academy for Newcastle United, which was later built in Little Benton. A luxury hotel and golf course was later planned for the Woolsington Hall estate.[2] Hall was threatened with legal action by Newcastle City Council in 2005 unless he carried out repairs to Woolsington Hall.[2]
The hall was put up for sale for £2 million in October 2012, but withdrawn from sale in May 2013. Due to the dereliction of the hall, it has been described by the Daily Telegraph as a "distressed asset".[6] In 2013 the councillor for the Woolsington ward, George Pattison, said that “It is a complete waste for it to be standing empty. It is a beautiful building and has a lot of historical significance...If it could be restored to something of the calibre of the Mansion House in Jesmond then it would be a great asset to the ward.”[2] The house was made weather tight in 2008.[7]
Since 2002 the Woolington Hall estate has been on English Heritage's Heritage at Risk register.[2] The register said that the hall "...is vacant and showing signs of roof failure."[7] It is rated Category C by the register, defined as "Slow decay, no solution agreed".[7]
The Leaze Gates, a set of two tonne monumental gates from Newcastle United F.C.'s St. James Park stadium, were stored in the grounds of Woolsington Hall until their restoration in August 2013. It had been hoped that they would form the entrance to a new football training centre at the hall.[8]
http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/forums/...ec-2013-a.html

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Old January 23rd, 2014, 09:35 AM   #27
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Experts are to assess the at-risk Ravensworth Castle site in Gateshead which could deteriorate further



Quote:
Experts are to investigate an at risk castle site hidden between two of Tyneside’s busiest locations.
The privately-owned Ravensworth Castle is concealed by woodland from the A1 and the Team Valley trading estate.
It contains the remains of a 14th-century castle, including two towers and part of the curtain wall, which are listed Grade II-star, putting them in the top 5% of historic assets in the country. They are also a scheduled monument.
Other remains, also listed Grade II-star, include those of an elaborate castle-style mansion designed by the architect John Nash in 1808 and completed in 1846.
Also listed is a stable block and gatehouse from around 1840.
All are on English Heritage’s At Risk Register and are in the North East top 10 for priority action because of their “immediate risk of further rapid deterioration”.
Yesterday, Gateshead Council’s cabinet backed the appointment of a team of experts for a two-year exercise, with grant funding from English Heritage.
The team’s brief is to “provide a clear picture of the current repair needs, priorities and associated costs to develop and deliver a project to safeguard the future of the historic buildings at Ravensworth Castle.”
The site is described as containing nationally-significant historic assets.

Had to do a few amendments due to spelling and since when has the castle been between the TVTE and the A1?


http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...storic-6536374
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Old February 7th, 2014, 12:20 PM   #28
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Restoration saves rare Northumberland heather barn

From yesterday's Journal Live,. copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...letion-6673058

Restoration saves rare Northumberland heather barn
By Tony Henderson - 6th February 2014


Gareth Preece the owner of the newly thatched 18 century shed in Tow House, Northumberland

A celebratory bash in a barn yesterday marked the restoration of a unique historic survivor.

The grade II-star listed Black Barn at Tow House, near Bardon Mill in Northumberland, is the only structure in England to have retained original heather thatch - once common in the uplands of Northern England.

The survival of the thatch in the early 18th Century barn gave experts the chance to learn how farming communities centuries ago built such features.

The barn is also one of only a handful of timber-framed cruck buildings north of the Tees - a construction dating from early medieval times in which naturally curved, rough-hewn wood is at the heart of the building.

Yesterday the barn was the base for a celebration to mark the completion of its restoration, following a £145,000 grant from English Heritage and contributions from the building’s owners and Northumberland County Council.

It will now be removed from English Heritage’s At Risk register.

Robin Dower, from Cambo-based architects Spence & Dower, who co-ordinated the restoration, said: “Because the barn had surviving heather thatch we could examine how our ancestors did it in terms of putting it together and it has allowed us to understand about the North of England thatching tradition.

“They used what was available, and we can look how the heather was laid and fixed, and the use of other materials like clay and layers of turf.”

Long-stemmed heather was employed in the days before moors were managed for grouse shooting and sheep.

Supplies for the restoration came from forestry moorland north of Rothbury.

The use of heather was widespread until it was replaced by slate in the later 19th Century.

Kate Wilson, Heritage at Risk principal adviser for the North East at English Heritage said: “This is a really special building, and an astonishingly rare combination of timber-framed cruck construction and heather thatch still in place.

“It’s been a privilege to work with a team of specialists and the owners to bring this building back into use. It’s now ready to stand up to the worst the weather has to throw at it.

“This project has provided us with a lot of valuable information about traditional, regional construction techniques.”

Gareth Preece, co-owner of the Black Barn, said: “We are delighted that this amazing barn has been restored.”
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Old May 2nd, 2014, 10:41 AM   #29
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Plans unveiled to turn historic Woolsington Hall into Newcastle's first five-star hotel

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrian_Swall View Post
Woolsington Hall is up for sale on Rightmove for £2 million.
Sir John Hall selling up.
Who was the original owner?

Newcastle Council Rents up by an average of 5.1% for NCC and Byker Trust properties and 3.3% for Leazes Homes (new build).
From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...ington-7062365

Plans unveiled to turn historic Woolsington Hall into Newcastle's first five-star hotel
May 02, 2014 06:3 By Sarah Scott



Plans have been announced to transform a derelict country hall owned by businessman Sir John Hall into Newcastle’s first five-star hotel.

Bosses at Cameron Hall Developments hope to turn Woolsington Hall, on the outskirts of Newcastle, into a luxury hotel complete with golf course, restaurant, spa and cookery school. The impressive Grade II* listed hall has been left derelict for decades, falling onto the English Heritage “At Risk Register” in 2000. But it is hoped the latest proposals for the grounds would see the 17th Century hall, purchased by Cameron Hall Developments in 1994, brought back to life and finally taken off the register for good.

The plans for the 34-bedroom boutique hotel and leisure complex, which will be submitted to Newcastle City Council this summer, will be funded through the construction of 70 detached executive homes on land to the south of the historic parkland.

Cameron Hall Developments’ chief executive Paul Mackings said: “Newcastle is one of the few major cities in the UK which lacks a five-star hotel which this development will provide. The building’s historic assets will be sensitively refurbished to provide a superb backdrop for this 34-bedroom ‘boutique’ hotel, with each of the suites uniquely different. In addition, as part of the hotel, the development will include the construction of a restaurant within the former stables, a spa complex within the former farm buildings, a walled garden marquee for events, weddings and receptions and a cookery school within the walled garden cottage. The leisure complex will be completed by the construction of a sensitively detailed 18-hole golf course.”

Plans were unveiled to residents in the area yesterday at a consultation exhibition in Kingston Park.

Read more and see image gallery @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...ington-7062365
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Old August 4th, 2014, 04:47 PM   #30
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Keelmen's Hospital

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On a recent walk, someone referred to the 'row raging over the Keelmans' Hospital'. Is there a row? where is it raging? I guess this is about the proliferation of new Student accommodation, and the fact that the Keelmans was once student accommodation but is now unused and declining.
Probably rows raging in the minds of those who cherish the heritage of Newcastle - it does in my mind from time to time when I see it standing unused and forlorn.

The Keelmen's Hospital remains on the English Heritage Buildings At Risk Register and there are real concerns as to what is going to happen with it. Has to be put to some use, but what, that is the question.

One fear is that it will end up like the Barley Mow:


Image hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.com/Sallyport%20Area
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Old September 17th, 2014, 07:43 PM   #31
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At Risk - Sallyport Tower - Wall Knoll Tower - Volume 1

Sallyport Tower is on the English Heritage Risk Register @ http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...type=all&crit=

Heritage Category: Scheduled Monument

Name: Sallyport Tower, Tower Street, Newcastle upon Tyne
Street: Tower Street
District/London Borough: Newcastle upon Tyne
Locality: Newcastle upon Tyne
County: Tyne and Wear
Parliamentary Constituency: Newcastle upon Tyne East
Region: North East
Designation: Scheduled Monument, 2 LBs, CA
List Entry Number: 1019810
Condition: Fair
Occupancy/Use: Vacant/not in use
Priority Category: E - Under repair or in fair to good repair, but no user identified; or under threat of vacancy with no obvious new user (applicable only to buildings capable of beneficial use)
New Entry: Yes
Owner Type: Local authority
Contact: Kate Wilson 0191 269 1221

First time I had been inside the Tower on 12th September 2014 - One of Newcastle's Grade 1 Listed Buildings, this is the protection text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co...l-knoll-tower-

Description: Sallyport or Wall Knoll Tower

Grade: I
Date Listed: 17 December 1971
English Heritage Building ID: 304897

OS Grid Reference: NZ2547464148
OS Grid Coordinates: 425474, 564148
Latitude/Longitude: 54.9713, -1.6036

Locality: Newcastle upon Tyne
County: Newcastle upon Tyne
Country: England
Postcode: NE1 2AY

NZ 2564 SW NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE TOWER STREET (east side)
21/549 Sallyport or Wall knoll
17.12.71 Tower
GV I

Lesser gateway in Town Wall; Company of Ship's Carpenter's meeting hall above.

C14 Town wall; 1716 meeting hall.

Coursed squared sandstone wall; sandstone ashlar hall with pantiled roof. 2 storeys, 2 bays. Wall has central round stone arch containing studded double doors with large hinges. Room above has 2 round-headed sashes with glazing bars in panels with voussoirs and keys continuous with channelled rustication. Top cornice breaks forward over end and central pilasters. Root has 4 square corner turrets with pyramidal stone roofs and ball finials. Left return has steps up to door and fanlight with glazing bars; low-relief ship's hull in panel above.

Listing NGR: NZ2547464148

This is an extract from Newcastle Town by R.J. Charlton:

The Carpenter's Tower, or Sallyport, was in good preservation, with its fine old arched gateway and the figure of a ship (the emblem of the Shiprights' Company) cut in stone above the entrance to the upper storey, reached by a flight of stairs. Bourne tells us that in 1716 the Company of Carpenters or Shipwrights built upon "the under part of it a very grand and stately square tower, adorned at the top corners with four fair turrets in the form of a lanthorne;" which tower, with its" four fair turrets," is what we see now.
Inside the gateway was a carter's yard, with sheds, and stables, and dung-hills, covering the site of the graveyard where lay the mortal remains of the Trinitarian brethren.

Pesvner has this to say:

WALLKNOLL or SALLYPORT TOWER, which became the meeting hall of the Ships' Carpenters' Company in 1716. They then built their superb, bold hall above the minor gateway, in such confident style that comparisons have been drawn with the work of Vanbrugh. No architect for it has yet been identified. It is ashlar, with pilasters and big eaves cornice; two windows in each long side in rusticated keyed round-headed surrounds, another in the short side to the w. On the E, steps lead to the hall door, which is set under a round overlight in a rusticated corniced panel; above the cornice is a carved relief of a ship's hull- proclaiming the trade of the company. But the most striking feature is the assemblage of turrets on the corners, cubes with small round-headed openings (blocked) and with ball finials on stone pyramid copings.

SiteLines make these observations:

In 1716 the Shipwrights' Company enlarged the tower, giving it a long E-W axis, and built a hall on the first floor with access by stairs at the E end. The Company retained it until the mid19th century after which it had a number of uses and was rescued from dereliction and possibly demolition in the 1960s. McCombie - bold ashlar C18 meeting hall on top of medieval gate. Architect unknown, but comparisons have been drawn with Vanbrugh's work. Pilasters and big eaves cornice; two windows in each long side in rusticated keyed round-headed surrounds; another window in a bow on the short side to the west. On the east, steps lead to the hall door: round overlight in a rusticated corniced panel; above, a relief of a ship's hull. Square corner turrets with small round-headed blind openings; pyramid tops and ball finials. From 1716 until 1759 Presbyterians met in the Carpenters' Hall, the remodelling of the upper part of the medieval tower.

The Shipwrights Company make these comments of the Newcastle Freemen's web site @ http://www.freemenofnewcastle.com/shipwrights

In 1716 when the Company was at its most prosperous and influential an upper storey was built upon their meeting place at the Sallyport gateway in the Town Walls. Much of the Company's revenues came from fines on members for absence from quarterly meetings, working on church holidays and poor workmanship. However others were for misconduct in the meeting house and in 1696 it was decreed that no brother may take on an apprentice who was a Scotchman born.

The Sallyport Tower, a listed building, had by this time become rather dilapidated and in 1955 because of the liability to maintain the structure the City Council purchased the property and spent about £10,000 on renovation. Over the years the Company had held its meetings in the Guildhall due to the state of the Sallyport through lack of maintenance but in 1970 the meetings were held in the refurbished Tower and continued there until 1979, from which time the Guildhall has again been used for Head Meetings on the first Monday in June each year.

External shots:






Old sign in entranceway


Gate at rear - south side


Rear platform









Images hosted on http://www.fototime.com/58A0DA921068...lyport%20Tower
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Old September 17th, 2014, 07:44 PM   #32
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At Risk - Sallyport Tower - Wall Knoll Tower - Volume 2

Vaulted room - ground floor level




















Images hosted on http://www.fototime.com/58A0DA921068...lyport%20Tower
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Old September 17th, 2014, 07:45 PM   #33
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At Risk - Sallyport Tower - Wall Knoll Tower - Volume 3

Vaulted room - ground floor level




Upstairs room








Ship Panel


Spare land at south east end

Images hosted on http://www.fototime.com/58A0DA921068...lyport%20Tower
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Old October 8th, 2014, 10:04 AM   #34
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Grand old Victorian church in Newcastle given £150,000 worth of spit and polish

Courtesy of the Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...castle-7896211
Grand old Victorian church in Newcastle given £150,000 worth of spit and polish
Oct 07, 2014 19:00 By Will Metcalfe


St. Lukes Church, Newcastle which is being restored

A red brick Victorian church is enjoying a Renaissance after a six-figure fundraising campaign.

St Luke’s Church, in Spital Tongues, Newcastle has been given a face lift to help remove 128 years of ingrained dirt. The church closed in 2006 then was reopened a year later by Reverend Dr Robert Ward, as a ‘Fresh Expressions’ Evangelical Christian community venture. Six years later the congregation is thriving, having grown from a tiny handful of parishioners to a regular attendance of more than 100 people - who refer to themselves at the ‘New Wine on Tyne’.

The Rev Ward said: “The building has been completely cleaned - taking off almost 130 years of grime, smoke and filth. There are several thousand bricks that have been removed because they were crumbling and they have been replaced with replica Victorian bricks, made in Barrow-in-Furness. It looks brilliant.”

When he began the project St Luke’s was on English Heritage’s buildings at risk register. But following the first stage of the restoration project, it looks set to be removed. The clean up work has been financed by a grants from the National Churches Trust and the Northumbria Historic Churches Trust totalling £41,000 and tithes received from parishioners.

Pringle Building Services carried out the work which has helped revitalise the Victorian church but The Rev Ward said more was to come.

Read more and see image gallery @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...castle-7896211
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Old October 23rd, 2014, 10:00 AM   #35
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20 North East buildings join English Heritage risk list

From the Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/20-...s-join-7980992
20 North East buildings join English Heritage risk list
Oct 23, 2014 06:30 By Tony Henderson


The Fulwell windmill in Sunderland, which is the only working survivor of over 180 windmills

A landmark windmill, medieval churches and an 18th Century country house are among North East historic gems which have been added this year to an at-risk list.

Twenty sites and conservation areas in the region have joined English Heritage’s at-risk register, which is published today. The register covers Grade I and Grade II-star listed sites – the top 5% gradings of listed buildings and structures. The North East has a total of 287 sites on the register – a 6.8% rate compared to 4% nationally. But this is seven sites less than last year, as 27 have come off the list with their future secured.

Over the year more than £768,000 has been offered in grants to help some of the North East’s most important historic sites.

Tyne & Wear - Also joining the at risk list are:
Church of the Holy Trinity, Sunderland, built 1718-19; Italianate chimney at Cleadon Pumping station, built 1860-62; Church of St Patrick, High Street, Felling, Gateshead, 1893-95; Church of St Aloysius, Hebburn, 1888; Church of St Luke, Claremont Road, Newcastle, 1890; the 14th Century Sallyport Tower, part of Newcastle’s medieval defences, which lies empty and has been the target for vandalism.
Coming off the list in Tyne and Wear is the Church of St James in Benwell in Newcastle.

Northumberland - Also joining the at risk list are:
Church of St Michael, Alnham dating from the 12th Century; Church of Our Lady, Seaton Delaval. 12th Century; Holy Cross Church, Chatton 1763-70; Church of St Aidan, Tarset, 1818,
Taken off the register are a heather thatched barn at Tow House, Bardon Mill; limekiln at Little Mill, Longhoughton; Christ Church, Hepple; Cartington castle, near Rothbury, monastic cell and medieval tower, Coquet Island; bastles at Tarset.

In County Durham, the gothic country house Hamsterley Hall has been declared to be at the highest level of risk.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/20-...s-join-7980992

Link to the English Heritage Risk Register for Tyne & Wear - http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...type=all&crit=

Link to English Heritage Risk Register for the North East - http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...type=all&crit=

Link to English Heritage Risk Register for Northumberland - http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...type=all&crit=
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Last edited by Steve Ellwood; October 23rd, 2014 at 12:40 PM. Reason: Added English Heritage link
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Old October 24th, 2014, 10:29 AM   #36
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This from the Sunderland Echo,--

Sunderland landmarks put on English Heritage’s at-risk register




TWO of Sunderland’s historic landmarks have been added to a list of buildings with an uncertain future ahead of them.


Both Fulwell Windmill and The Church of Holy Trinity have been added to English Heritage’s at-risk register, which is published annually.

The register covers Grade I and Grade II-star listed sites, which make up the top five per cent of listed buildings and structures.

Fulwell Windmill, built in 1821, is the last of many which could be seen up and down the coast at its time. It had been a popular visitor attraction but forced to close to the public in 2011 after it was damaged in a storm.

Sunderland City Council has allocated funds to undertake repairs that will make the structure watertight, with the first phase of the work due to start in the summer.

Read more http://www.sunderlandecho.com/news/l...ster-1-6913725
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Old October 24th, 2014, 10:38 AM   #37
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This is a real shame. I visited the mill a few years ago with my son and we were shown around and up to the top to look out over Fullwell and Seaburn, It was fantastic. The place looked well kept then with a little shop next to it. We then walk along to the lime kilns and then round to the sound mirror behind the Mill garage. I know it's not much but we should care for and promote what we have in Sunderland.
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Old October 24th, 2014, 12:21 PM   #38
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Mitford Castle - At Risk Volume 1

From the English Heritage At Risk Register - http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...type=all&crit=

Mitford Castle, Mitford - Northumberland (UA)

Late C11 motte and bailey castle converted to shell keep in C12. Five-sided keep of C13 includes C12 curtain wall, curtain wall structures and mid C12 chapel. It is now a roofless ruin but capable of consolidation. Grant offered for photographic recording (now complete). English Heritage offered grants towards three phases of the repair programme, the first two of which are now complete.

Heritage Category: Scheduled Monument and Listed Buildings

Name: Mitford Castle
Parish: Mitford
Unitary Authority: Northumberland (UA)
Parliamentary Constituency: Wansbeck
Region: North East
Designation: Scheduled Monument and Listed Buildings - 5 grade I
List Entry Number: 1017318 and 1370755; 1042645; 1370756; 1042647; 1042646
Condition: Poor
Occupancy/Use: Not applicable
Priority Category: D - Slow decay; solution agreed but not yet implemented
Previous Priority Category: D - Slow decay; solution agreed but not yet implemented
New Entry: No
Owner Type: Commercial company
Contact: Kate Wilson 0191 269 1221

These images were taken 3rd January 2001:




















Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.com/Mitford
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Old October 24th, 2014, 12:21 PM   #39
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Mitford Castle - At Risk Volume 2

From the English Heritage At Risk Register - http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...type=all&crit=

Mitford Castle, Mitford - Northumberland (UA)

Late C11 motte and bailey castle converted to shell keep in C12. Five-sided keep of C13 includes C12 curtain wall, curtain wall structures and mid C12 chapel. It is now a roofless ruin but capable of consolidation. Grant offered for photographic recording (now complete). English Heritage offered grants towards three phases of the repair programme, the first two of which are now complete.

Heritage Category: Scheduled Monument and Listed Buildings

Name: Mitford Castle
Parish: Mitford
Unitary Authority: Northumberland (UA)
Parliamentary Constituency: Wansbeck
Region: North East
Designation: Scheduled Monument and Listed Buildings - 5 grade I
List Entry Number: 1017318 and 1370755; 1042645; 1370756; 1042647; 1042646
Condition: Poor
Occupancy/Use: Not applicable
Priority Category: D - Slow decay; solution agreed but not yet implemented
Previous Priority Category: D - Slow decay; solution agreed but not yet implemented
New Entry: No
Owner Type: Commercial company
Contact: Kate Wilson 0191 269 1221

These images were taken 3rd January 2001:




















Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.com/Mitford
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Old October 25th, 2014, 12:46 PM   #40
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Historic landmarks in Cleadon and Hebburn put on risk list

Courtesy of the Shields Gazette @ http://www.shieldsgazette.com/news/l...list-1-6914015
Historic landmarks in Cleadon and Hebburn put on risk list
23rd October 2014


St Aloysius RC Church, Hebburn

TWO of South Tyneside’s historic landmarks have been added to a list of buildings with an uncertain future ahead of them.

Cleadon Pumping Station and the Church of St Aloysius in Hebburn, have been added to English Heritage’s at-risk register, which is published annually.

The register covers Grade I and Grade II-star listed sites – which make up the top five per cent of listed buildings and structures. The North East has a total of 287 sites on the register – a 6.8 per cent rate compared to four per cent nationally. However, 27 have come off the list after having their future secured, with more than £768,000 given out in grants over the last year.

Towering above the Cleadon Hills, the 100ft chimey of the pumping station, built in 1860-62, provided water to the South Shields area. Once a chimney for the steam-powered pumps, it is typical of the grand Victorian waterworks of the day.

Joining it for the dubious honour of being on the list is Hebburn’s St Aloysius Church, in Prince Consort Road, Hebburn, which was built in 1888.

Read more @ http://www.shieldsgazette.com/news/l...list-1-6914015
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