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Old April 29th, 2015, 07:33 PM   #61
Ken O'Heed
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All Saints Church, Newcastle - some pictures 29/04/15

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Originally Posted by No Opinion View Post
Is all saints still used?
Not only is All Saints a gem of a church it has perhaps the most ingenious method of dda compliant level access ever seen!

The way I see it the interior of all Saints is completely redundant for any kind of use other than worship, a function dramatically dwindling in our secular society.

Are the stalls inside original? I hope they aren't, because if the round space could be cleared it would be a fantastic something. Sadly, I'm not sure what. But it could be amazing
Following on from the answer given by Steve in post #60 on 20/04/15

Some pictures taken by myself Wednesday 29/04/15 approx 1200 showing the exterior of building and surrounding area

Sign - still noting services held at 1030 on Sundays





Gate on south elevation now with securuity fence around it





Security fence on north west elevation



However access to the churchyard is still available via the north side of the building - access from Silver St either from quayside area or from Tyne Bridge area via paths to south side of All Saints Office Complex









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Old May 21st, 2015, 09:09 PM   #62
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Morpeth park's historic at-risk buildings saved by cash boost

Courtesy of the Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/north-ea...ldings-9297538
Morpeth park's historic at-risk buildings saved by cash boost
11:30, 21 May 2015 By Barbara Hodgson



An endangered 19th Century greenhouse in Northumberland has been saved thanks to funding boost.

The rare lean-to hothouse in Felton Park is one of just two surviving examples of its type in the North East and, together with its adjoining potting shed, has been on Historic England’s heritage-at-risk register for years. But now both are to be restored to their former glory and open for members of the public to enjoy.

Built around 1830, the 90ft curved metal and glass structure is one of earliest and most complete such designs developed by famous Scottish-born garden designer John Claudius Loudon. At the time the use of wrought iron and fish-scale glass was an innovative technique. There are just 19 others like it in England and Mr Maxwell wants to preserve it for future generations.

Historic England, the Heritage Lottery Fund, Country Houses Foundation and Northumberland County Council stepped in to support a revamp of the grade II-listed buildings which are an eye-catching feature next to the park’s 18th Century garden wall which has a well-documented horticultural history.

Tim Maxwell, who’s owned the historic Felton Park for the past five years, said the injection of funds from heritage bodies is “a mark of how important this building is”. Mr Maxell did not want to disclose the total amount of the award but said: “I’ve also provided money myself and I am delighted to have received such strong support from Britain’s leading heritage organisations. The restoration will not only allow greater access but enable the greenhouse to take its proper place in the gardening history of Northumberland.”

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/north-ea...ldings-9297538
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Old May 28th, 2015, 12:50 PM   #63
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Corbridge (Walkers) Pottery Kilns

Want on a circular walk from Corbridge, Deadridge Lane past Aydon Castle and return via Leazes Lane.
Came across two Pottery Kilns which I hadn't heard of before. They were opened in 1840 and made tiles, sanitary ware etc. There are also some 'Newcastle Kilns' which are horizontal rather than conical in shape. I hadn't heard of a Newcastle Kiln?
The entrance to the kilns are maintained but there is a private house as part of the site so I was unable to get access to the whole
area. Well worth a look!
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Old May 28th, 2015, 05:29 PM   #64
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Walkers Pottery

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Originally Posted by Adrian_Swall View Post
Want on a circular walk from Corbridge, Deadridge Lane past Aydon Castle and return via Leazes Lane.
Came across two Pottery Kilns which I hadn't heard of before. They were opened in 1840 and made tiles, sanitary ware etc. There are also some 'Newcastle Kilns' which are horizontal rather than conical in shape. I hadn't heard of a Newcastle Kiln?
The entrance to the kilns are maintained but there is a private house as part of the site so I was unable to get access to the whole
area. Well worth a look!
I see the former Walkers Pottery is on the At Risk Register Adrian - check out http://risk.historicengland.org.uk/r...type=all&crit=


Walkers Pottery, west bottle kilns, Milkwell Lane, Milkwell Lane, Corbridge, Northumberland (UA)

© English Heritage

Early C19 bottle kiln used to produce pipes, tiles and low-grade pottery for agricultural purposes. One of the few remaining examples of a Tyne Valley rural pottery. In poor condition, although deterioration is slow and controlled. Discussions are underway to try and secure a programme of recording and repairs.

Heritage Category: Scheduled Monument and Listed Buildings

Name: Walkers Pottery, west bottle kilns, Milkwell Lane
Street: Milkwell Lane
Parish: Corbridge
Unitary Authority: Northumberland (UA)
Parliamentary Constituency: Hexham
Region: North East
Designation: Scheduled Monument and Listed Buildings - 2 grade II*
List Entry Number: 1006441 and 1370576; 1155212
Condition: Poor
Occupancy/Use: Not applicable
Priority Category: C - Slow decay; no solution agreed
Previous Priority Category: C - Slow decay; no solution agreed
New Entry: No
Owner Type: Charity (heritage)
Contact: Sara Rushton 0191 269 1222

This is the Protection Text courtesy of the British Listed Buildings web site @ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co...d#.VWb61UbIbW8

CORBRIDGE MILKWELL LANE
NY 96 NE
5/183 Walker's Pottery:
Downdraught kiln
15.4.69 with adjacent chimney
(previously listed as
Old Pottery, Milkwell
Lane)

GV II

Downdraught kiln and chimney, later C19. Kiln brick, chimney engineering brick.
Lower part of circular kiln with cavities in wall opening to outer face by small round arches, internal walls of cavities much vitrified. Tall tapering stack to north-west, with cornice below top. Derelict at time of survey.

Listing NGR: NY9924165236

Some information from the SINE web site @ http://sine.ncl.ac.uk/view_structure...p?struct_id=73

Corbridge Pottery, also known as Corbridge Fire Brick and Sanitary Tube Works, operated from 1840 to around 1910. Sanitary ware, bricks, tiles and chimney pots were manufactured here. The products would be made from clay and water and bricks would be moulded by hand, using wooden shapes. The kiln was used to bake the bricks so they became stronger and more durable. It could take weeks to bake a full kiln of bricks.

Image courtesy of the Heritage Explorer web site @ http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/w...5&crit=pottery



Also an excellent set of photographs @ https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnsu...7625904122289/
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Old September 4th, 2015, 01:33 PM   #65
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‘At-risk’ lime kilns heritage site to get £450,000 restoration

From today's Shields Gazette @ http://www.shieldsgazette.com/news/l...tion-1-7443961
‘At-risk’ lime kilns heritage site to get £450,000 restoration
04 September 2015


Marsden lime kilns

An at-risk industrial landmark is to enjoy a near half of a million pound renaissance, it has emerged.

The Marsden Lime Kilns site is a ‘scheduled monument of national importance’ – one of only three in the borough of South Tyneside, alongside Arbeia Roman Fort in South Shields and St Paul’s Monastery in Jarrow. But it also features on English Heritage’s ‘Buildings At Risk’ list due to its poor condition.

The massive structures, essentially large ovens, dating from the 1870s, were an offshoot industry of the former Whitburn Colliery. The square kilns, built in the 1870s, produced quicklime which was used in agriculture to neutralise soil.

Now it has emerged that Historic England and the owners of the kilns site, Owen Pugh, are to jointly fund a restoration programme, expected to begin next spring. The aim is to restore the kilns and attract more visitors to the site. The project costs are in the region of £450,000, to be shared equally between Historic England and Owen Pugh.

John Dickson, chairman of the Owen Pugh Group which owns Marsden Quarry where the lime kilns are located, said: “Marsden Lime Kilns have been a significant feature in South Tyneside’s landscape since the 1870s and a visible reminder of our industrial past. We are delighted to provide funding, alongside grant aid from Historic England, to ensure the long-term preservation of this important local landmark.”

Read more @ http://www.shieldsgazette.com/news/l...tion-1-7443961
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Old September 4th, 2015, 01:45 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
From today's Shields Gazette @ http://www.shieldsgazette.com/news/l...tion-1-7443961
‘At-risk’ lime kilns heritage site to get £450,000 restoration
04 September 2015


Marsden lime kilns

An at-risk industrial landmark is to enjoy a near half of a million pound renaissance, it has emerged.

The Marsden Lime Kilns site is a ‘scheduled monument of national importance’ – one of only three in the borough of South Tyneside, alongside Arbeia Roman Fort in South Shields and St Paul’s Monastery in Jarrow. But it also features on English Heritage’s ‘Buildings At Risk’ list due to its poor condition.

The massive structures, essentially large ovens, dating from the 1870s, were an offshoot industry of the former Whitburn Colliery. The square kilns, built in the 1870s, produced quicklime which was used in agriculture to neutralise soil.

Now it has emerged that Historic England and the owners of the kilns site, Owen Pugh, are to jointly fund a restoration programme, expected to begin next spring. The aim is to restore the kilns and attract more visitors to the site. The project costs are in the region of £450,000, to be shared equally between Historic England and Owen Pugh.

John Dickson, chairman of the Owen Pugh Group which owns Marsden Quarry where the lime kilns are located, said: “Marsden Lime Kilns have been a significant feature in South Tyneside’s landscape since the 1870s and a visible reminder of our industrial past. We are delighted to provide funding, alongside grant aid from Historic England, to ensure the long-term preservation of this important local landmark.”

Read more @ http://www.shieldsgazette.com/news/l...tion-1-7443961
Not sure about this.

Don't get me wrong, I am all for preservation and restoration. But what are these 'large 1870s ovens' actually going to do? Monuments to themselves? Will they have any educational value or facilities?

I think it is wasteful. There are so many more heritage assets in the region falling apart (Keelman's Hospital springs to mind) that wont get half a million funding, and would provide some form of function, unlike the lime kilns.
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Old September 4th, 2015, 02:40 PM   #67
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I think it's because Owen Pugh are putting in half so £225,000; which is great as they don't have to really. Also, it would probably cost a lot more to demolish, remediate and landscape the area.
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Old September 4th, 2015, 03:02 PM   #68
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I think it's because Owen Pugh are putting in half so £225,000; which is great as they don't have to really. Also, it would probably cost a lot more to demolish, remediate and landscape the area.
Half a million is a hell of a lot for something that isn't a building
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Old September 4th, 2015, 03:41 PM   #69
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‘At-risk’ lime kilns heritage site to get £450,000 restoration

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Originally Posted by No Opinion View Post
Not sure about this.

Don't get me wrong, I am all for preservation and restoration. But what are these 'large 1870s ovens' actually going to do? Monuments to themselves? Will they have any educational value or facilities?

I think it is wasteful. There are so many more heritage assets in the region falling apart (Keelman's Hospital springs to mind) that wont get half a million funding, and would provide some form of function, unlike the lime kilns.
I suppose its one of those 'damned if you and damned if your don't' things, Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM) and its falling down.

For it to a viable visitor attraction it will need some sort of interaction, perhaps they are going to fire up one of the kilns again?

As to the Keelman's, at least there is some good news bubbling under with the interest of the 'ethical hotel' proposal.
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Old September 4th, 2015, 04:03 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
I suppose its one of those 'damned if you and damned if your don't' things, Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM) and its falling down.

For it to a viable visitor attraction it will need some sort of interaction, perhaps they are going to fire up one of the kilns again?

As to the Keelman's, at least there is some good news bubbling under with the interest of the 'ethical hotel' proposal.
Maybe the half a million would be better spent on restoring some of the kilns, with the rest providing the interaction you state, with the rest part of a programme towards full restoration.

The Keelman's hospital sprang to mind. Sadly as you know we have too many SAM's in need of attention in our region.
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Old September 4th, 2015, 04:51 PM   #71
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I do agree with you that we have too many and it would be great if they could all be 'stabilised'. Only because I've been interested since I was young is Ravensworth Castle. Part listed, part scheduled monument; was on BBC's Restoration a few years ago. Would love to see it restored, or even just be turned into homes (you can't get up to it atm anyways).
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Old September 4th, 2015, 05:01 PM   #72
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English Heritage often seems belligerent to development of heritage assets.

I for one would rather see somewhere like Ravensworth Castle developed into something useable, with a physical contribution of this era to increase its feasibility, rather than mindless restoration of exactly something as it was. So long as the new elements were tasteful and sympathetic of course!!
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Old September 4th, 2015, 05:38 PM   #73
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Totally, I don't understand the reasoning of conserving buildings in aspic and some would disagree, but hate when people want something left as a ruin (apart from places like Tynemouth Priory etc.) if it could have a use such as Ravensworth Castle. As long as the restoration uses the correct materials, replicates or faithfully reproduces lost elements and also doesn't ruin for generations to come; then I personally see no issue.
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Old September 4th, 2015, 05:49 PM   #74
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http://www.archdaily.com/72192/kolum...peter-zumthor/

Even ruins can be creatively and positively re-used. I'm not saying Tynemouth Priory should. But if any proposal came in that had such quality it enhanced the ruins and its environs, we should take it seriously.

EH have their nimbyesque criteria, and automatically throw something out if it doesn't synch.
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Old September 4th, 2015, 06:11 PM   #75
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Yeah, I've seen a few good developments of ruins where they've added usually a pure glass element and usually as a learning space etc.

My ideal is similar to the approach of Hellifield Peel Castle (featured on Grand Designs), which was basically a shell and turned back into a functioning, better maintained than a ruin 'building', although wasn't too keen on some of the interiors.
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Old September 4th, 2015, 06:23 PM   #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elliott View Post
Yeah, I've seen a few good developments of ruins where they've added usually a pure glass element and usually as a learning space etc.

My ideal is similar to the approach of Hellifield Peel Castle (featured on Grand Designs), which was basically a shell and turned back into a functioning, better maintained than a ruin 'building', although wasn't too keen on some of the interiors.
There's two schools of thought on this.

One is the 'light touch' approach, more general and insisted upon by EH. It pertains that any development should affect the historic element lightly and be completely removeable.

The other, more radical thought is a heavy approach. Often these historic buildings have become a plethora of styles and eras, why not directly contribute to assert its use for the modern day? Why not be bold?

What I think is important is that there is a clear articulation between old and new. Something the pastiche brigade do not understand. Take the Newcastle Keep. Originally it was square and monolithic. Then the Victorians came along and disneyfied it with the extra crenellations and towers atop. The discernment between old and new is unidentifiable.
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Old September 4th, 2015, 06:41 PM   #77
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Yeah, I'd go along with that. New should appear 'new', I also think this applies for most things though in development e.g. an extension on a standard 30's semi should IMO be stepped back and subservient to the existing building.

With regards to the Disney-fying Victorians, I remember years ago telling my girlfriend at the time (boring her tbh) about the modifications that the Victorians made to the Keep and most old gothic Churches in Britain and she was surprised as she thought they were the 'genuine' article.
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Old October 20th, 2015, 11:44 AM   #78
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Two Newcastle cemeteries go on Historic England at risk register

Courtesy of today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...toric-10291293
Two Newcastle cemeteries go on Historic England at risk register
20 Oct 2015 By Tony Henderson


The entrance gateway and lodge at St John's Cemetery in Newcastle

A lighthouse and two 19th century listed cemeteries are among historic locations at risk in the region, according to a report out on Tuesday. Included on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register are the Old Pier lighthouse in Sunderland, as well as Westgate Hill and St John’s cemeteries in Newcastle.

Westgate Hill General Cemetery was opened in 1829 because Newcastle’s churchyards were running out of space. The Westgate Hill General Cemetery Company was set up and acquired the site which was one of the earliest private cemeteries in England. The site included high walls and iron railings, a house for the sexton, chapel and register office, landscaping and paths – although these were later removed to accommodate more burials. The last burials took place around 1960.

Historic England says: “Although having lost its chapel, and the original layout being obscured by vegetation, you can still get a sense of the scale and character of the site. The remaining monuments are of a style particular to early cemeteries, although many have been damaged through weathering, vandalism and ivy growth. Sadly the site is suffering from invasive weeds and scrub growth along with vandalism and anti-social behaviour which are putting the site at risk.”

St John’s Cemetery in Elswick was opened in 1857, with a Gothic gateway and lodge and two chapels. It covered 28 acres and was extended early last century, with nearly 1,050 buried there. "The listed entrance lodge buildings and the mortuary chapels are derelict and vacant,” says Historic England. The twinned northern entrance lodges and ornate entrance arch are vulnerable from neglect and vandalism and many of the monuments are in a poor condition. Although the burial ground is maintained, the vacant buildings are a magnet for vandals. We are working with Newcastle City Council to realise the potential of this important cemetery.”

There are a total of 67 grade I and grade II-star buildings and structures in the North East on the At Risk register – one more than last year.

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...toric-10291293
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Old October 20th, 2015, 12:01 PM   #79
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Sallyport Tower - At Risk Register

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Sallyport Tower is on the English Heritage Risk Register @ http://risk.english-heritage.org.uk/...type=all&crit=

Heritage Category: Scheduled Monument

Name: Sallyport Tower, Tower Street, Newcastle upon Tyne
Street: Tower Street
District/London Borough: Newcastle upon Tyne
Locality: Newcastle upon Tyne
County: Tyne and Wear
Parliamentary Constituency: Newcastle upon Tyne East
Region: North East
Designation: Scheduled Monument, 2 LBs, CA
List Entry Number: 1019810
Condition: Fair
Occupancy/Use: Vacant/not in use
Priority Category: E - Under repair or in fair to good repair, but no user identified; or under threat of vacancy with no obvious new user (applicable only to buildings capable of beneficial use)
New Entry: Yes
Owner Type: Local authority
Contact: Kate Wilson 0191 269 1221
Good to read in Tony Henderson's article in today's Chronicle Live that the Sallyport Tower is no longer on the At Risk Register.

http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...toric-10291293

Taken off the register this year is Sallyport Tower in Newcastle, a grade I-listed 18th century building which incorporates medieval remains.

It forms part of the eastern side of Newcastle’s town defences which date from the mid-13th century to the middle or late 14th century.


Image hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.c...lyport%20Tower
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Old October 20th, 2015, 08:25 PM   #80
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Quote:
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Courtesy of today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd
Two Newcastle cemeteries go on Historic England at risk register

New member, recently found the forum. Remember your name Steve from uk.l.g many moons ago.

Spent the last few days reading many of the threads here and am thrilled to have found the site.

On the above, grew up in the west end - in sight of St Johns. It's an amazing place visually and more importantly to connect us with the stories of the people who lived in the area. Have spent many an afternoon reading the gravestones and memorials. Such a shame its falling into disrepair. The Chapel is in an awful state and really should be rescued, as should the main gate off Grainger Park road.

Remember there was once a house on the west side of the cemetery which was demolished in the late 80's/early 90s. Anyone got any pics?

There is also the burial ground for the pit disaster at Montagu(?) and some incredibly ornate plots.

As for the one off the west road, it is a disgrace that it has been allowed to fall into such a state. I guess most people buried there are long since forgotten but action should be taken to maintain it at a reasonable and respectable standard.
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