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Old August 5th, 2012, 05:37 PM   #41
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Just drove down from the borders, we can either go A68/A696 route over the top or A697 round the side, glad we chose the latter, apparently the river has flooded at Jedburgh.

It was pretty bad in places, water shooting up from the drains in Blackadder but not as bad as the Newcastle storm of a few weeks ago.
This from yesterday:

Flash floods in Haltwhistle hit motorists on A69

Aug 5 2012 by Sophie Doughty, Sunday Sun


DRIVERS battled their way down water-logged roads as flash floods hit the North yesterday.

Just over a month after the region was battered with one of the worst downpours of rain in living memory yet another deluge caused traffic chaos

As most of the North was basked in sunshine, the heaven’s opened above west Northumberland, yesterday afternoon.

And the sudden heavy rain caused stretches of the A69, near Haltwhistle, to become impassable, leaving many motorists stranded.

Northumbria Police began to receive reports of the flooding at around 2.40pm.

The A69 was quickly flooded and large amounts of mud on the road, near Melkridge caused a further hazard for drivers.

More at http://www.sundaysun.co.uk/news/nort...9310-31553238/
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Old August 5th, 2012, 07:21 PM   #42
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It has to be worth noting that, as with the storm of Thursday 28th June, today's brief but torrential downpour happened while the tide was out.
The lower Ouseburn reached 1.5mtrs above mean (the level normally associated with 75% of a typical tide). The impact on low lying properties would have been quite different if the tide had been in.

Within 30 minutes of the start of the storm, water was gushing upwards through some drains in Heaton which are 35mtrs above sea level.
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Old January 25th, 2013, 11:12 PM   #43
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How is the weather in the North East. In Cumbria we've had a blizzard for the last six hours which has made a 20 minute commute into an hour and a half journey and the roads are almost impassible. I'm locked in for the night, though the television has gone off, and planning for an early night. Luckily- and this also applies to the North East- a massive thaw will start at midnight, which will see temperatures rise to 6 degrees by lunchtime.
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Old January 26th, 2013, 01:56 AM   #44
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How is the weather in the North East. In Cumbria we've had a blizzard for the last six hours which has made a 20 minute commute into an hour and a half journey and the roads are almost impassible. I'm locked in for the night, though the television has gone off, and planning for an early night. Luckily- and this also applies to the North East- a massive thaw will start at midnight, which will see temperatures rise to 6 degrees by lunchtime.
Seems okay so far in the Team Valley. Wind picking up a little but no snow yet!
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Old January 26th, 2013, 05:12 PM   #45
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Seems okay so far in the Team Valley. Wind picking up a little but no snow yet!
Lucky, in Whitehaven, the snow is thawing fast, but because it drifted in strong winds there's still quite a lot of wet and dangerous slush around. Hopefully it will be gone by tonight when I go for my Saturday night intake of real ale.
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 12:59 AM   #46
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It is 50 years ago this year, since the everlasting . . .
WINTER OF 1963.



I remember the winter of 1963 very well. It actually started at the back end of 1962 to be precise, on my birthday in fact (Christmas Eve) just as I was walking past St Georges Church at the top of Osborne Road. I was with my parents, and everyone commented on how "nice" it looked as it started to snow for the first time that year. How nice for Christmas, as the large snowflakes started coming down . . .

What none of us knew then, was that we would not see ANY green grass again until Easter!!!

The winter of 1963 - AMAZING!

My father kept a copy of the below Evening Chronicle Supplement about it all, which I now have . . .


Evening Chronicle February 16th 1963 - the 1963 'Frozen North' Evening Chronicle Supplement.















A bit of a "contrast" with the snow - SOUTH PACIFIC, after its long run of 'separate performances' at The Queens Cinema, was finally released to normal cinemas, such as the Newcastle Odeon . .





If anyone wants to see an enlarged copy of any specific area of the narrative in the above (to read it more clearly) happy to oblige, just ask!

.
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Old April 1st, 2013, 01:18 PM   #47
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After enduring the coldest March on record, it appears from the forecast that it will be getting colder again towards the end of the week! I'm normally the first to applaud cold weather but this is just getting ridiculous. I definitely think I'll be going back to a modern apartment after being froze to the bone in old buildings this winter.
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Old June 8th, 2013, 03:38 PM   #48
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Weather still excellent, 19 degrees and sunny in Whitehaven and this weather is due to last until Tuesday. Rest of the month is a bit more unsettled with heavy rain at times, but when it's dry it will be reasonably warm and sunny. Looks like we'll avoid the total disaster that last June was and I think on balance we'll have a summer like two years ago, warm at times but with rain in between.
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Old July 25th, 2013, 04:11 PM   #49
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Thunder Thursday - the impact on Newcastle

Some interesting statistics from the Newcastle City Council web site @ http://www.newcastle.gov.uk/news-sto...pact-newcastle

Thunder Thursday - the impact on Newcastle

Published date: Thu, 25/07/2013 - 10:15

One in five homes in Newcastle damaged by floods last summer was not insured.

That’s one of the findings of a new report by Newcastle City Council into the devastating impact of Thunder Thursday (June 28) and further downpours on August 5 and 6.

The report, described as giving the most complete picture of flooding in the city, was compiled from a survey of almost 3,000 residents and 72 non-residential properties such as schools.

Among other things, the survey showed:

500 homes suffered internal flooding
In the vast majority of cases flooding took place within one hour
Two thirds of residents were flooded for the first time
One in five residents had to move out of their homes for flood repairs
54 non-residential properties were flooded forcing 40 per cent to close temporarily

The purpose of the survey, carried out from last July to August, was to gauge the geographical spread of flooding across the city and its impact.

On Thunder Thursday, 50mm of rain fell in around two hours - the equivalent for Newcastle of the whole month of June. Pictures of streets under water, homes, schools and shops flooded were seen all over the world.

A Scrutiny Review of flooding across the city and how the council and its partners responded is currently underway and due to report to the Cabinet in October. A separate review is looking into the collapse of a culvert at Newburn.

The findings of the most recent report will be taken into account as part of both reviews.

Deputy Cabinet Member for Neighbourhoods, Cllr Nigel Todd, said: “Flooding is a natural occurrence. We cannot prevent it entirely, but a lot can be done to minimise the risk of flooding and reduce its devastating impact.

“More than 500 homes were flooded, many within an hour, and the vast majority for the first time. Public buildings like schools were flooded and had to close while repairs were carried out. This all demonstrates just how exceptional the weather in June was.

“I think the council and the emergency services did a good job in very difficult circumstances - but there is always room for improvement which is what our Scrutiny Review is looking into. The council can’t do everything so it’s very important that people realise they must take responsibility for protecting their homes.

“They should seek advice and take action so they are prepared the next time this kind of extreme weather event happens. There is advice and links on the council’s website to help them.”

The floods caused massive damage to roads and footpaths across the city worth up to £8 million.

Works to make the city more resilient to flooding are currently underway. Three million pound is being spent to reduce the risk of flooding in the city and the council is applying to the Environment Agency for funds which would enable further improvements.

To access the full report and receive advice on how to protect your property from flooding and what to do during flooding go to: http://www.newcastle.gov.uk/environm...ecent-flooding


The National Flood Forum advises and supports communities who have been affected by flooding, or are at risk of flooding, and can be contacted on 01299 403 055.

The city council works very closely with Northumbrian Water and the Environment Agency on managing flood risk in the city.

It’s findings will be used to inform the Scrutiny Review that is currently taking place in the council into how it, and its partners, responded, and what lessons can be learned so the response next time is better.

The report lists a number of recommendations including:

Raising awareness about what to do before, during and after a flood, and where to find information and support
Investigate piloting a point of contact where residents can ring for advice following a flood
Carry out a review of the gully cleansing regime
Investigate piloting a volunteer flood warden system

Non-residential properties include schools, shops, and leisure facilities

The Flood and Water Management Act requires the city council to produce a Local Flood Risk Management Strategy to help address the risk of flooding across the city. A draft will go out to consultation later this year.

In total 12,000 questionnaires were issued to residents and 350 to non-residential properties.
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Old July 29th, 2013, 03:27 PM   #50
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It's been very thundery and wet in Cumbria through the night with the A595, which is used to access Sellafield, flooded? Has it been the same in the North East?
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Old July 29th, 2013, 03:49 PM   #51
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It's been very thundery and wet in Cumbria through the night with the A595, which is used to access Sellafield, flooded? Has it been the same in the North East?
Showers and sunny outbreaks, grey skies at the moment and thunder sounding as I type, still, good for the gardens
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Old July 29th, 2013, 09:34 PM   #52
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Showers and sunny outbreaks, grey skies at the moment and thunder sounding as I type, still, good for the gardens
Saw Look North,Whitley Bay has had some very heavy downpours today and the speedway at Newcastle was rained off over the weekend. Carlisle had 76 mm of rain over the weekend, Whitehaven( where I live) had a torrential downpour last night and on Saturday, got caught up in it. However, the hot weather is returning on Thursday.
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Old November 17th, 2013, 05:58 PM   #53
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Great Flood of 1771

Quite a momnetus day 242 years ago when huge flooding of the Tyne caused the Tyne Bridge to be swept away - this is how it was reported by John Sykes in his Local Records:

November 17th 1771

About two o'clock in the morning of this day (Sunday), the inhabitants of Newcastle were alarmed with the most dreadful inundation that ever befell that part of the country, the water in the Tyne rising six feet higher than the remarkable fresh, in December, 1763.

The first appearance of day discovered a scene of horror and devastation too dreadful for words to express, or humanity to behold, without shuddering. All the cellars, warehouses, shops, and lower apartments of the dwelling houses, from the west end of the Close to near Ouseburn, were totally under water. The flood was so rapid and sudden, that it was with the greatest difficulty the inhabitants, who slept in the lower parts of the houses, escaped with their lives.

The middle arch of Tyne Bridge, and two other arches near to Gateshead, were carried away, and seven houses with shops standing thereon, together with some of the inhabitants, overwhelmed in immediate destruction.

Mr. Fiddes, who lived on the north end of the bridge, with his wife and maid-servant, having made their escape to Gateshead, the girl, recollecting a bundle which she left behind, begged her master she might go back for it, and that he would be so kind as to accompany her; which request, after some reluctance, he complied with, and his wife stood watching their return; but in a moment after their separation, the arch under them gave way, when they vanished from her view, and she never saw them more. Mr. Fiddes and his maid, Ann Tinkler, Mr. Christopher Byerley and his son, together with an apprentice to Mr. James, were the persons who perished by the falling of these arches; and the houses and shops which fell into the river that morning were occupied by Mr. Patten, mercer; Mr. W. Hills, shoemaker; Mr. Byerley, hardwareman, Mrs. Haswell, milliner; Ann Tinkler, dealer in stuffs and checks; Mr. Edward Wilson and John Sharp, shoemakers; Mr. Walton, flax-merchant; and Mr. John James, cheesemonger. Four other houses, with shops likewise, fell from the bridge the next day into the river, two of which belonged to Mr. Akenhead, and the others to Mr. Fawcett; and, in a little time after, the whole range of buildings, from near the blue-stone on the bridge (the boundary between Newcastle and Durham), into Gateshead, met with the same fate. Mr. Patten's house was carried wholly as far as Jarrow Slake, about eight miles down the river, where it was stopped but upon examining the inside, nothing was left in it but a dog and a cat, both alive. The very remarkable preservation of Mr. Peter Weatherley, a shoemaker, with his family, who lived upon the bridge at the time the arches fell down, ought to be particularly noticed. Between three and four o'clock that morning, he was suddenly awakened by the prodigious noise of the flood, and on opening a window, observed Mr. and Mrs. Fiddes, two children, and their maid passing along the bridge; on shutting the window again, he was about repairing to rest, when, all on a sudden, the arch immediately adjoining his house on the north side rushed down. This instantly drew his attention to the family's safety, and, rousing them up, he opened the door, when he beheld the destructive torrent rolling almost immediately beneath him. He then, with difficulty, quitted the house, and, at the utmost hazard of his life (the pavement breaking and tumbling beneath his feet into the water), assisted his wife, two young children, and a servant girl to follow him. As all access to the north was cut off by the falling of the above arch, they immediately hastened to the south end, but had not gone far until they perceived themselves involved in still greater misery and danger, two other arches having likewise fallen at that part. In this distressful situation they remained from four till ten o'clock in the morning, perishing with cold, and affording a most melancholy spectacle to the inhabitants on each side of the water. Their station was upon a surface about six feet square, all other parts of the arch which supported them appeared terribly rent, and threatened each moment to bury them in the flood. None durst attempt to relieve them by boats, and no other human means seemed possible. However, a bricklayer in Gateshead, named George Woodward concerted a method for their deliverance, and boldly ventured alone to execute it. A range of shops then standing on the east side of the bridge, supported only by timber, laid from pier to pier, and extending from Gateshead to the place where the distressed people stood, afforded him the means of preserving their lives, he broke a large hole through the side of every shop all the way to the arch where they were, and through these openings brought the whole family safe into Gateshead. The children when rescued were nearly exhausted with cold.

The water was supposed to be at its height about seven o'clock in the morning, and to have risen upwards of twelve feet above high water-mark in spring tides.

The Sandhill was a capacious flood; and boats plied thereon some hours. In some parts it was six feet deep. All the timber, merchants' goods, &c., lying upon the Quay, and on the several shores in the neighbourhood, were entirely swept away with the current, as were most of the ships lying at the Quay, and a number of keels, boats, and other small craft, both above and below bridge, carried down the rapid current, and scattered and stranded on each side of the river to Shields, or otherwise borne onwards to the sea, and there sunk or wrecked along the coast. Three sloops and a brig were driven upon the Quay, and left there when the flood abated; they furrowed up the pavement, and broke down a great part of the Quay.

But Newcastle did not alone suffer by the terrible violence of this flood; scarcely a village or cottage house, from Tynehead, in Alston-moor, to Shields, escaped its destructive fury. The bridges at Alston, Ridley-hall, Haydon, Chollerford, and Hexham, were all carried away by the torrent; many people were drowned; a prodigious quantity of horses, black cattle, sheep, and other animals perished.

The wooden bridge at Allendale was swept away entire, and was discovered the next day lying across a lane near Newbrough, as exactly as if fixed there by human means.

At Haydon Bridge it overflowed the whole town, which obliged the men, with women and children on their backs, to wade almost up to their necks to the church, where they found sanctuary; when their necessities were kindly attended to by the Rev. Mr. Harrison.

Several houses and estates suffered considerably in the neighbourhood of Hexham, though happily no lives were lost there. A man at the West Boat saved himself and family by breaking through the thatch of his house, on the top of which they were obliged to continue many hours in a half naked condition.

The estates of Mr. Dunn, with his corn stacks, suffered greatly; and in a part of the Spital, belonging to Mr. Westall, a large square stone was discovered, seemingly the base of a pedestal or cross.

The farms of Mr. Robert Bell and Mr. Harbottle, with their cattle, were much destroyed, as were some other grounds belonging to Sir Walter Blackett. The water-course to the mills was entirely diverted.

The beautiful bridge at Hexham, consisting of seven arches, and which had only been finished the year before, with great rejoicing; was totally demolished during the night.

An inscription on a stone, near Warden, informs the passenger that the water rose 13 feet above its level at that place.

The only bridge upon the river Tyne which was left standing was that at Corbridge, which was built in 1674, on the old Roman foundation. he water at this place was so tremendous, that some persons, late in the night, stood upon the bridge and washed their hands in the rolling river. The preservation of this bridge was attributed to its Roman foundation, and a vast quantity of water having passed it at its south end, which is low ground.

The inhabitants of Bywell were amongst the most unhappy sufferers in this melancholy catastrophe. The whole village was under water; and in the dining room, and other rooms on the first floor of Mr. Fenwick's house, it was eight feet deep. The farmers there lost all their corn and haystacks, cows, &c. All the garden walls belonging to Mr. Fenwick were broken down, and the gardens entirely destroyed. A delay of five minutes would have effected destruction to his whole stud, together with four servants. Most of the valuable stud of horses were got into the inside of the Black Church, and saved themselves by holding by the tops of the pews, which were allowed to continue in their gnawed state for several years after the flood. A mare belonging to Mr. Elliott, father-in-law to Mr. Thomas Bewick, who was on a visit to Bywell at the time, was saved in the same church by getting upon the altar table. About ten houses were swept away, and six persons perished. Several lives were saved miraculously by twigs, ropes, trees, &c., and many people were taken out of their houses through the roofs. The shrieks of women and of children, frantic with all the agonies of despair, will better be conceived than described. The White Church-yard wall was entirely destroyed, and a great part of the church-yard washed away. The Black Church walls were likewise very much ruined, and the parish accounts destroyed. Dead bodies and coffins were torn out of the church-yard; and the living and the dead promiscuously clashed in the torrent.

The tragic fate of the persons in the boat-house, at Ovingham, was truly heart-rending. When the water entered the house, there were ten people in it, John Johnson, the boat-man, his wife, and two children, his mother and his brother, his man and maid-servants, with a young man from Prudhoe, and a labouring man named George Simpson. On their perceiving the danger they were in, they all went up stairs, and,. as the water advanced, they ascended nearer the roof of the house, till at last they were obliged to break through the wall into the stable that was built at the end of the dwelling-house, thinking it a place of greater safety, both by its strength and situation, and made themselves a temporary place to sit on, by putting a deal and a ladder betwixt the binding bails, and there remained till one o'clock in the morning, at which time, perceiving the dwelling-house gone, and the stable beginning to give way, they got upon the top of the stable, when three of them climbed up to the chimney top, George Simpson, the young man from Prudhoe, and the boatman's brother, and the boatman, his wife, mother, and two children, and the man and maid-servants remained as before, when, in an instant, the building fell, and they were all swept away by the torment, and carried down with the thatch, &c., for near 300 yards into the wood, where the boatman, his brother, and maid-servant got upon trees, and continued in that situation ten hours before they could be relieved, and the maid died soon after she got to land. The unhappy husband, when he seized the tree with one hand, caught his wife with the other, and, after holding her a few minutes, she was wrested from him in fifteen feet depth of water, and in the midst of a rapid current. The wretched husband and his brother were the only survivors left out of the ten persons to relate the sad catastrophe.

The whole workings of Wylam colliery, containing 300 acres. were completely inundated. There were l,728,000 hogsheads of water in the several seams of coal.

At Team, near Swallwell, people were taken out of the tops of their houses; a boat was driven against a house almost under water, of which the people immediately laid hold, and thereby saved the whole family, and some others who would have certainly perished; and in another, an old man and his wife were found hanging by the spars of the roof, the water being so high.

By the violence of the flood, several ships were driven from their moorings at Shields upon the Herd Sand, some of which were lost. A boy belonging to one of these ships continued alone upon the main-top mast-head from Sunday morning to Monday morning, none daring to venture sooner to his assistance, when he was taken off alive. A woman with a child in her arms was found drowned on Jarrow Slake; and a vessel took up at Sea, near Shields, a wooden cradle with a child in it, which was alive and well.

The flood in the river Wear was nearly as violent as that in the river Tyne; Frosterley, Wolsingham, and Witton Bridges being all destroyed. The water at Durham was eight feet ten inches higher than ever known before. Two houses at the end of Framwellgate bridge, with all the furniture, were entirely swept away, One of the abbey mills, and the bridge belonging to the dean and chapter were carried away, as were four arches of Elvet bridge, and all the lower buildings of the city, garden walls, &c, either destroyed or left in a ruinous condition. Mrs. Morgan's house, and Mr. Wilkinson's coach-house, both in Elvet, were driven down by the water, but the houses behind prevented them being carried off. Many other houses were greatly damaged. Several horses, cows, &c., were drowned in the stables, byers, &c. happily, no lives were lost there, though a young woman fell into the water by the bank giving way, and was carried 700 yards down the river, yet was saved by the assistance of her fellow-servant. Two of Mr. Carr's servants, of Cocken, perished in crossing the river at Cockenford.

The water at Chester-he-Street extended near 200 yards from north to south in the street, and did considerable damage to the dwelling-houses and shops there. The mill, with most of the mill houses and furniture, belonging to Johe Etherington, near Cocken, were carried away, as were also all the corn stacks belonging to Mr. Mowbray, at Newbrough, the fishing-lodge, and most of the furniture at Lumley boat-house. The collieries at North Biddick, Chaters'-haugh, and Low Lambton, on the Wear, were all filled with water, and upwards of thirty horses in the several workings drowned. Several waggons, with houses, and a great quantity of coals were swept off, and the fire engines belonging to the two former collieries entirely destroyed. All the low grounds from Chester to Cocken were covered with the dead carcases of horses, cows, oxen, and sheep, and also with corn and haystacks, household furniture, and wood of all kinds.

At Sunderland there was a great destruction among-the ships and keels. The cries of the poor boys (few of the men being on board), with the cracking of the ships, was indeed terrible. All the assistance possible was sent by the inhabitants; but the darkness and wetness of the night prevented many from receiving proper help. A great number of keels were driven away, and many men and boys were lost. A part of the pier gave way to the force of the water, and another part was damaged by the ships that drove against it. Eight or nine dead bodies were cast ashore on the Sunday morning in the harbour. Haystacks and great quantities of household furniture, with a staith, were driven down the Wear into the sea. Thirty-four ships were wrecked at the mouth of the Wear.

These images courtesy of the Newcastle City Libraries Archive Collection on Flickr:

008881:Tyne Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne ?G. Hastings Auty Fine Art Photographers around 1904
Type : Photograph Medium : Print-black-and-white Description : This black-and-white photographic print was created in or before 1904. It shows a 1604 engraving of the River Tyne the old Tyne Bridge and Newcastle upon Tyne. The view is looking from Gateshead side of the Tyne towards Newcastle. The Tyne Bridge is in the centre on the left-hand side of the picture and is seen with houses shops and towers built upon it.The first medieval Bridge was possibly built in the late 12th century. It was rebuilt after the fire of 1248 and remained in use until 1771 when it was destroyed by a great flood. This photographic print shows a detail of the same engraving that was reproduced for an Auty Series postcard (see Accession No. 068212) published in or before 1904.

image hosted on flickr


066525:Tyne Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown 1771
Type : Print Medium : Engraving-handcoloured Description : A copy of an etching of the Tyne Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne in 1771. The etching shows the Tyne Bridge after the floods of 1771. The fifth seventh eighth and ninth arches have collapsed taking shops and houses with them.

image hosted on flickr
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Old November 17th, 2013, 06:18 PM   #54
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Temperatures set to plummet as Arctic blasts bring snowfalls to the North East

Winter Draws on - this from today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...blasts-6312118

Temperatures set to plummet as Arctic blasts bring snowfalls to the North East

By Lisa Hutchinson - 17th November 2013



Artic blasts will bring snow to the North this week as temperatures plummet to below freezing.

Forecasters have warned that the coldest weather of the year so far is set to hit parts of the country as Arctic winds bring flurries of snow and widespread frost.

By Tuesday, large parts of the UK could see wintry showers with the chance of some significant snowfall on higher ground.

But snow is more likely along coastal regions and the northern parts of England and Scotland, the Met Office said. Forecaster Dan Williams said: “On Tuesday morning some people could wake up to see snow falling – but it won’t last for long.

“There could be some slushy snow in places – possibly where showers get organised.

“There will be more persistent snow showers along coastal areas. There could be accumulations of snow on higher ground and in some coastal areas it could settle.”

There will be a significant drop in temperatures overnight tomorrow as the mercury falls as low as -4C (25F) in our region and -3C (27F) in some parts of southern England. Those in Scotland should be braced for temperatures as low as -5C (23F). The average temperature for Britain in November is 9C but daytime temperatures will be dropping to as low as 5C in some parts of the country next week.

Forecasters are warning people to be prepared for a cold snap.

A forecaster at Meteogroup said much of the UK could be covered in a “nice and pretty” light dusting of snow as it gets “noticeably colder”.

Experts do not expect the snow to cause any disruption and believe temperatures will climb again by next weekend.

Sainsburys expect a 200% increase in sales of snow shovels in the coming week.
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Old November 18th, 2013, 12:53 AM   #55
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Colder in the coming week but not right now 22:47 where the temperature is 10 degrees C which is way ABOVE average for this time of year and surprise surprise, a gritter has just gritted part of heaton, only for the rain to wash it away.

Now you know where your tax goes ........ into their pockets. Nice little earner.
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Old November 18th, 2013, 09:52 PM   #56
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Colder in the coming week but not right now 22:47 where the temperature is 10 degrees C which is way ABOVE average for this time of year and surprise surprise, a gritter has just gritted part of heaton, only for the rain to wash it away.

Now you know where your tax goes ........ into their pockets. Nice little earner.
I ve sat supping a pint and watched the car park next to the Sage being gritted to death on a warm winter's evening more than once....
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Old November 18th, 2013, 10:38 PM   #57
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I ve sat supping a pint and watched the car park next to the Sage being gritted to death on a warm winter's evening more than once....
Gritting is important and needs to be a priority. Gritting on a mild evening when it's raining and followed by a mild day is pouring our money down the drain.

They started 24 hours early, but i'm sure they won't complain about the overtime before Christmas.

Me cynical ....... never!
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Old November 19th, 2013, 07:41 PM   #58
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It snowed today. The kids I teach went mental.

Yey...
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Old November 19th, 2013, 10:15 PM   #59
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My kids love it too, no snow in heaton, guess i'll have to take them up to consett, they usually get it first.
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Old November 20th, 2013, 07:38 PM   #60
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Bloody awful weather this evening! Started with heavy rain then developed into hail/sleet/snow and thunder and lightening, all accompanied by a strong wind
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