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Old December 21st, 2013, 08:59 PM   #81
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It's not been very cold but certainly windy in the NE. There was a vicious hailstorm earlier this morning. Hopefully the weather will improve over Christmas and I can manage a few good walks in the Lake District.
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Old December 21st, 2013, 09:40 PM   #82
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It's not been very cold but certainly windy in the NE. There was a vicious hailstorm earlier this morning. Hopefully the weather will improve over Christmas and I can manage a few good walks in the Lake District.
I've seen two thunderstorms in one day, torrential rain today and yesterday, hail, gale force winds last night and more to come on Monday and part of Tuesday. Only thing is when it will be dry, it will still be very blustery and almost no chance of snow except on very high ground.
Rather like two years ago, I think we are going to have a mild and very unsettled winter.
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Old January 15th, 2014, 03:25 PM   #83
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On This Day In History - 15th January 1814

Quite mild outside today but they same couldn't be said about the weather 200 years ago.

This report from John Sykes in his Local Records for 15th January 1814.

The frost was so intense that the river Tyne, at Newcastle, was completely frozen over.

The temptation to indulge in skating was not to be resisted; and on the above day (Saturday) a Dutch seaman put the strength of the ice to the test, by passing over it with beef bones tied to the soles of his shoes, and a long pole of wood in his hand, that in case the ice had broken under him, he might have supported himself with the pole until assistance had been afforded him.

Numbers soon afterwards ventured upon it, and the next day, notwithstanding it snowed very hard almost the whole time, the skaters were numerous, and continued their diversion till the evening.

On the Monday and Tuesday, the ice having been swept by the keelmen, who, by this means, endeavoured to raise a little money to maintain themselves whilst laid off work by the frost, the number of people who ventured upon the ice was very great, and even ladies graced the scene with their presence. The skaters were very numerous, and amongst those who delighted the spectators by their grace and expertness in this most elegant exercise, were particularly noticed.

The ice, after these two days, was covered with such a quantity of snow as to render skating impracticable. The snow being reduced by a quantity of rain which fell, became afterwards so frozen as to present once more an uncommonly thick surface of ice. Of this opportunity numbers availed themselves; the river, for several days, continued to be covered with crowds of people, amusing themselves in different ways upon its surface. Several booths were erected upon the ice for the bale of spirituous liquors, and some fires kindled. The immense thickness of the ice removing all fear of danger, numerous parties, of all ages, ranks, and sexes, were to be seen in every direction, perambulating over its glassy surface, and enjoying the novelty of the scene. Several races took place, both with and without skates, for prizes consisting principally of different pieces of wearing apparel, as hats, stockings, &c. but in one instance, of the substantial comfort of a leg of mutton. These afforded great amusement. On other parts of the ice, parties might be seen playing at foot-ball, quoits, &c., and in other directions, fruit and cake sellers, fiddlers, pipers, razor-grinders, recruiting parties, &c., were to be met with. In short, the whole scene more resembled a country wake or fair, or a race-ground, than anything else to which it could be compared. From the brilliancy of the moon, which was then full, the sports were continued each night to a late hour.

Another partial thaw took place, but a very sharp frost succeeding, the same scenes and amusements were renewed. On one day, a horse and a sledge were upon the ice, and on another, a horse and a gig. Both getting on and off the ice was attended with some difficulty, the edges being so broken by the rising and falling of the tide. Gangways were laid down at different places to remedy this inconvenience, and a toll being exacted from every person who passed over, became a source of revenue for those persons who were laid off employment by the frost. Each gangway was attended by four men, who were changed every day.

The average thickness of the ice was stated at about ten inches; in some places there was a double ice. The sheet which admitted of skating extended from Redheugh to the Glass-house bridge.

The navigation of the river was completely closed, as far down as St. Peter's Quay.

The ice finally broke up on Sunday, the 6th of February.

This painting courtesy of the Newcastle City Libraries Archive Collection on Flickr showing an earlier occasion when the Tyne froze.

004092:Newcastle during a severe frost Unknown 1784
Type : Painting Description : A copy of a painting which shows a view of Newcastle from Gateshead during a severe frost in March 1784. The Tyne has frozen over and people are walking or skating across it.

image hosted on flickr
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Old June 2nd, 2014, 10:25 AM   #84
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Weather experts from Newcastle University warn more monsoons could be on the way

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...y-warn-7199371

Weather experts from Newcastle University warn more monsoons could be on the way
Jun 02, 2014 06:30 By Tony Henderson



More “Toon monsoons” could be on the way, warn experts.

Extreme summer rainfall may become more frequent in the UK due to climate change, according to new research led by the Met Office in collaboration with Newcastle University. The new study uses a climate model providing the first evidence that hourly summer rainfall rates could increase. While summers are expected to become drier overall by 2100, intense rainfall leading to serious flash flooding could become several times more frequent. The results from the study are the first step towards building a more complete picture of how UK rainfall may change as the climate warms.

Prof Hayley Fowler, from Newcastle University’s School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, said: “We need to understand about possible changes to summer and winter rainfall so we can make informed decisions about how to manage these very different flooding risks in the future. The changes we have found are consistent with increases we would expect in extreme rainfall with increasing temperatures and will mean more flash floods.The next steps are to see if these changes are consistent with observed trends in summer rainfall extremes and changes projected by climate models in other parts of the world. We will be looking at this over the next five years, jointly with the Met Office and other leading international scientists.”

Dr Lizzie Kendon, lead author of the research at the Met Office, said: “Until now, climate models haven’t been able to simulate how extreme hourly rainfall might change in future. The very high resolution model used in this study allows us to examine these changes for the first time. It shows heavier summer downpours in the future, with almost five times more events exceeding 28mm in one hour in the future than in the current climate – changes we might expect theoretically as the world warms. However, we need to be careful as the result is only based on one model - so we need to wait for other centres to run similarly detailed simulations to see whether their results support these findings.”

Read more and see image gallery @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...y-warn-7199371
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 05:25 PM   #85
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Interesting post from Sir Steve, I have noticed compared with the eighties when I was growing up, the rainfall seems to be far more severe than it was and a thunderstorm that lasted an hour can drag on for five hours. Last winter , which wasn't a winter in Whitehaven( one day of frost), was dominated by gale force winds and torrential rain. Three storms in a week was worrying.
The climate's undoubtedly changing. I'm not even that old and the weather is definitely getting milder and wetter compared to when I was younger.
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 06:22 PM   #86
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The climate's undoubtedly changing. I'm not even that old and the weather is definitely getting milder and wetter compared to when I was younger.
When I was a kid in the 70's on Low Fell the snow used to be down for so long you forgot what it looked like without it. Now the main difference between summer and winter is the temperature of the rain!
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 06:23 PM   #87
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The climate's undoubtedly changing. I'm not even that old and the weather is definitely getting milder and wetter compared to when I was younger.

As I was growing up, in various locations around Newcastle and Northumberland, we got snow EVERY winter.

In 1987 we moved house (so that is how I remember it) to North Newcastle, and I noticed that we never got snow for years and years.

In 1999 I was working in an office with a lot of youngish mothers, and there was a real snowfall that year. I remember all the mothers remarking that "their little Johnny" (or whoever) was loving the snow so much, as he had never really seen it before.

So, then the mild winters continued through the 2000s, with the 'odd' little snowfall, often melting away (if it 'lay' at all) by Mid-day.

Then we got a hard winter, it was the winter of 2009/2010 and we had quite a bit of snow, it was almost 'old-style' again. Then, in the following winter (2010/2011) there was a LOT of early snow, which disappeared just after Christmas, and did not come back, then the winter-before-last was also a cold (and a quite 'long') one.

What I'm saying is that the climate in the Newcastle Area has changed RADICALLY since the mid-1980s, when it first changed.

Basically we have had some snow in 1999 and three out of the last five winters have been . . er . . "wintry", but basically we have largely had mild winters since 1987, compared to the norm before that.

I have always had an interest in climatology, which is why I tend to remember these things!
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 07:04 PM   #88
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When I was a kid in the 70's on Low Fell the snow used to be down for so long you forgot what it looked like without it. Now the main difference between summer and winter is the temperature of the rain!
I do read up on weather nostalgia and actually for all there will have been the usual two weeks of snow and some bad frosts in the seventies, only 1969-70 and 1978-79( the winter of discontent) could be classed as severe. Indeed 1974-75 and 1975-76 were largely snowless and were followed by two fantastic summers.
The eighties were more of a mixed bag, now flitting between Cumbria and North Shields by then, I couldn't always vouch for what winters were like on Tyneside, but particularly harsh ones were 1981-82, 1984-85 and 1985-86 and the ones before, just after and in between had a mixture of mild periods and snow. The late eighties ones didn't really happen at all.
As for the summers, the seventies seemed to hit it lucky, especially if the winter was mild. 1972-77 seemed to produce some very good summers, 1970 was supposed to be very hot during the world cup, 1971 and 1978 were a let down, but 1979 came late and the August was fantastic. The eighties more mixed, 1980 and 1981 were wet and none too good, 1982-84 were hot with 1984 being hot all the way through, 1985 and 1988 were flops, 1986-87 so so and 1989 being hot in July and August.
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Old June 3rd, 2014, 11:09 PM   #89
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I do read up on weather nostalgia and actually for all there will have been the usual two weeks of snow and some bad frosts in the seventies, only 1969-70 and 1978-79( the winter of discontent) could be classed as severe. Indeed 1974-75 and 1975-76 were largely snowless and were followed by two fantastic summers.
The eighties were more of a mixed bag, now flitting between Cumbria and North Shields by then, I couldn't always vouch for what winters were like on Tyneside, but particularly harsh ones were 1981-82, 1984-85 and 1985-86 and the ones before, just after and in between had a mixture of mild periods and snow. The late eighties ones didn't really happen at all.
As for the summers, the seventies seemed to hit it lucky, especially if the winter was mild. 1972-77 seemed to produce some very good summers, 1970 was supposed to be very hot during the world cup, 1971 and 1978 were a let down, but 1979 came late and the August was fantastic. The eighties more mixed, 1980 and 1981 were wet and none too good, 1982-84 were hot with 1984 being hot all the way through, 1985 and 1988 were flops, 1986-87 so so and 1989 being hot in July and August.
I remember the winter of discontent very well, My Fathers union were on strike in sympathy with the coal miners but may have my dates mixed up. I recall going to school in a foot of snow in June 1981!
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Old July 3rd, 2014, 04:36 PM   #90
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The Boathouse, Water Row, Newburn

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Is it the Boathouse pub in Newburn, I seem to remember someone telling me about this who lived in the area
Indeed it is, stopped there back in May 2014 for a pint and a ham sandwich and sat outside in the sun enjoying it

The flood markings on the external wall show the levels at 1771, 1815, 1832 and 1850. Of course 1771 was the Great Flood that swept away all of the Tyne's bridges except for the one at Corbridge.

The Boathouse is Grade II Listed and this is the text from the British Listed Buildings web site @ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co...-public-house-

Description: The Boathouse Public House

Grade: II
Date Listed: 30 March 1987
English Heritage Building ID: 304367

OS Grid Reference: NZ1647265260
OS Grid Coordinates: 416472, 565260
Latitude/Longitude: 54.9817, -1.7441

Location: Water Row, Newburn, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE15 8NL

Locality: Newcastle upon Tyne
County: Newcastle upon Tyne
Country: England
Postcode: NE15 8NL

NZ 16 NE NEWBURN WATER ROW

7/47 The Boathouse Public House

G.V. II

Public house. Circa 1830.

Coursed squared sandstone with pecked ashlar dressings and quoins; Welsh slate roof with stone gable copings,and ashlar plinths to ashlar left and yellow brick right end chimneys. 2 storeys, 3 windows. Central joined boarded door: in stop-chamfered alternate-block surround; chamfered surrounds also to paired ground-floor sashes and to first-floor sash windows, the right boarded up, one with glazing bars. Ground floor string. Roof has triangular-section gable coping resting on moulded kneelers. Left chimney corniced.Right quoins incised with flood level marks 1856, 1830, 1815 and 1771.

Tyne and Wear County Council plaque at left commemorates association of George Stephenson with Water Row pit, where from 1798 to 1801 he was in charge of Robert Hawthorn's new pumping engine and his father, Robert, was fireman.

Historical note: The 1771 flood reached unprecedented heights and destroyed Newcastle bridge.

Listing NGR: NZ1647265260

These images taken 19th May 2014:




















Images hosted on http://ellwood.fototime.com/Newburn%...e%20Boathousei

Also copied into Newcastle Pubs.
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Old August 3rd, 2014, 03:59 PM   #91
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On This Day In History - 3rd August 1809

Bit of a storm passing over Newcastle as described by John Sykes for this day in history 3rd August 1809.

An awful storm of thunder, lightning, and hail passed over Newcastle.

The lightning entered the house of Mr. David Sutton, in Prince's Street, and did very great damage. It first struck the chimney, which it threw down, partly into the street, and partly into the house. It then followed the direction of the chimney into the sitting parlour, in which eight persons were at tea, bringing down a quantity of bricks and soot along with it, dashed over the urn and broke the cups, but fortunately injured no persons; it shivered the bookcase, seized the bell-wires, which it melted all over the house, following them from room to room in an upward direction; it tore the stair-case up in its passage, broke the glass of the clock, and stopped it, and split three bed poles to pieces, fusing some of the iron work, and finally passed out at the roof. In the different rooms, twenty-eight squares of glass were broken and forced outwards, and in one of the rooms, Mr. Sutton had a most providential escape, being there with the intention of shutting a window at the time it was struck. The lightning appeared in the parlour like a globe of fire; which afterwards divided into small globules that burst like a rocket. The oxidation of the bell-wires produced an effect beautiful beyond description. The door jamb of an adjoining house was torn off.

The lightning also struck down a chimney and entered the roof of Mr. Edward Humble's (bookseller) dwelling-house, near the Forth, and at the same instant shattered one of the pillars of the front door, communicating with and destroying all the wires of the bells in the first and second stories, shattered the stock of a gun in the kitchen, also the window shutters of three rooms, singeing the paper, and tossing about the lime from the tops of the windows where the bell-wires communicated; then burst out of the back stair-case window until a dreadful explosion, similar to the discharge of a cannon, and filling the rooms with a black sulphurous smoke. None of the family were materially hurt; but Mrs Humble was deprived for a few minutes of her hearing, and experienced a numbness in one arm: one of the maidservants was slightly scorched in one.

The lightning set a bark mill near St. Andrew's church on fire, but fortunately it was extinguished without much damage, except to the wands and one beam.

Mrs. Hawks' house, near Jesmond, was struck, and the works of a gold watch, which was hanging up in one of the rooms, were melted, and considerable damage was done to the walls, pictures, etc.

The lightning struck the house of Mr. P. Dale, of Walker, near Newcastle, threw down the chimney and a great number of tiles, broke seventeen pains of glass, tore off the window shutters, and dashed them against the garden pales, scattered the plaster about the house, and filled the rooms with a sulphurous smoke, but did not injure any of the family.

A horse was killed by it at Coxlodge.

The hailstones, or rather pieces of ice, were very large, and fell in great abundance.
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Old December 28th, 2014, 05:59 PM   #92
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On This Day In History - 28th December 1739

A little frosty out there this morning but nothing comapred to 275 years ago, as reported by John Sykes in his Local Records for this day in history, 28th December 1739.

A violent storm began at Newcastle and the neighbourhood, which continued several weeks with uncommon severity.

A great quantity of keels lying near Sandgate broke loose by the united efforts of the wind, tide, and masses of ice, and drove directly upon the ships and boats lying at the Quay; twelve wherries were sunk, part of them staved to pieces, and most of the ships were driven from their moorings, and received great injury by running foul of each other.

Immense masses of ice were heaped up in the river, which had a melancholy winter prospect, the Tyne being completely frozen up and the entire navigation stopped, so that tents were set up and various diversions exhibited upon the glassy surface. A great many people came daily from distant parts of the country to view this uncommon scene, the Tyne looking more like a fair than a navigable river.

This is a painting of a later freezing up of the Tyne (1784) courtesy of the Newcastle City Libraries Archive Collection on Flickr.

Newcastle Libraries
004092:Newcastle during a severe frost Unknown 1784

Type : Painting Description : A copy of a painting which shows a view of Newcastle from Gateshead during a severe frost in March 1784. The Tyne has frozen over and people are walking or skating across it.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/newcas...78021/sizes/o/
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Old January 7th, 2015, 04:05 PM   #93
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On This Day On History - 7th January 1839

Storms forecast for the area overnight but perhaps nothing on the scale of what happened 176 years ago - from Thomas Fordyce's Local Records, this day on history, 7th January 1839

The North of England was visited by a tempest, which, as regarded resistless fury and appalling magnitude, had not been equalled in this part of the country, and which bore a closer resemblance to a West Indian tornado than the storms which, however fierce, visit the temperate regions of our globe.

Soon after midnight, the wind shifted from S. to W.S.W., and gradually increased in fury until about six o'clock in the morning, when its violence was perfectly frightful. It is impossible to describe the sensation felt during this period. Impenetrable darkness veiled the face of nature, and when a sudden crash awoke the inmates of a dwelling, they knew not where to look for shelter amidst the ruin which surrounded them.

At length morning dawned on a scene of devastation such as few have witnessed. Bricks, slates, and tiles, in broken fragments, lay scattered over the streets in every direction, as if the town had stood a siege. No one ventured abroad that could possibly avoid it, and every thoroughfare was literally deserted.

The injury done to public buildings in Newcastle was very great. The Infirmary had three stacks of chimneys blown down. The roof of the west wing was almost stripped, and twelve large trees in the garden were uprooted.

At the Museum a sheet of lead, weighing nearly two tons, was torn from the roof and carried for upwards of 100 yards.

St. Thomas' Church had four pinnacles destroyed.

Much apprehension was at one time entertained for the safety of the beautiful steeple of St. Nicholas, but it withstood the tempest admirably.

The balustrades of the Royal Arcade were completely destroyed, and the glass domes on the roof were more or less broken.

The Grey Monument was observed to rock to and fro when the storm was at its height, but it suffered no injury.

A chimney, attached to the brew-house of Mr. Strachan, Barras Bridge, between fifty and sixty feet in height, fell with a fearful crash upon the workshops of Messrs. Burnup and Co., much to the consternation of the men, who, however, escaped.

A tall chimney at Elswick Lead Works, another at Mr. Burt's Steam Mill, in Thornton Street, and a third at Mr. Davidson's Tobacco Manufactory, in the Side, were blown down.

The bark mill of Mr. Beaumont, in Darn Crook, also received much injury, the wands of the mill being torn off with great violence, and, after hovering a little time in the air, fell into St. Andrew's church-yard with a tremendous crash.

A shed, upwards of three stories high, belonging to Mr. Arundel, skinner, Gallowgate, was completely demolished.

A ponderous sheet of lead, weighing 18 cwt. 2 qrs. 14 lb., was torn from the top of Mr. Baird's house, in Northumberland Street, passed a few inches above the head of a person near the spot, and was driven with such violence against the house of Mrs. Coward, on the opposite aide of the street, that the glass, frames, and shutters of two windows were shivered to fragments. The inmates, who were in the parlour, perceiving the lead coming, rushed out and escaped unhurt.

At Byker, owing to the high position of the village, the damage to property was very great, and a little girl was killed by the overturning of a waggon.

The river presented an extraordinary spectacle; and it may be noticed as one of the most striking evidences of the violence of the wind, that at the proper time of high water, the tide had not risen more than six inches above low water mark. The Fox steamboat was blown from its moorings, driven against the bridge, and sunk.

It is truly wonderful that in such a scene of devastation as the town presented, so few injuries should have been sustained by individuals. A female, however, of the name of Hodgson, had her arm broken in consequence of being driven by the wind against a wall, and a man named Hugh Hutchinson was thrown down and rolled over and over like a ball for some distance. There were several other persons thrown down during the day in various parts of the town.

In Gateshead the storm raged with even more serious effects than in Newcastle. Nearly every house upon the Fell was unroofed or otherwise
injured.

The beautiful chimney of the Brandling Junction Railway Company, 115 feet in height, was blown down, and a man named Henry Hawks had one of his legs broken.

A chimney, at Messrs. Abbot and Co.'s, 75 feet high, fell with a tremendous crash, and a man named John Errick was killed, while another person narrowly escaped.

Scotswood bridge was impassable throughout the day, and a man who attempted to traverse it on his hands and knees, was blown against the chains and had his arms broken.

The destruction of trees in the country was prodigious. At Chopwell upwards f 20,000 trees were uprooted.

Capheaton, Blagdon, Woolsington, Fenham, and many other seats were xtensively injured.

The most distressing accident occurred at the house of Mr. Orange, stationer, Bedford Street, North Shields. Mrs. Orange and the servant were in the kitchen, and what is remarkable, almost an instant before the catastrophe, she enquired whether the servant remembered the wind that occasioned the fail of Mr. Spence's chimney three years ago, and before an answer could be given, a stack of chimneys fell upon the roof, carrying down the upper story, and burying Mrs. Orange in the ruins. She was quite dead when got out; the servant escaped.

In Sunderland the large chimney attached to Mr. Richardson's steam mill was blown down, and two men, named Robson and Moore (brothers in-law), were killed on the spot, and a third had his leg broken.

At Morpeth the hurricane did considerable damage, unroofing many houses, blowing down chimneys, &c. The Royal Victoria Pavilion, belonging to "Billy Purvis," standing in Oldgate Street, was shivered to pieces, the scenery, dresses, &c., blowing about the streets in all directions.

Upwards of 250 trees were uprooted in the park and grounds about Alnwick Castle.

It is impossible to enumerate the whole of the disasters which occurred during this fearful hurricane, the foregoing being but a few of the more striking casualties.

The storm had scarcely ceased to vent its fury on the town of Newcastle, when a fire broke out in the shop of Mr. Cowper, grocer, Grainger Street, which completely destroyed the stock and fixtures, but the property was saved by the exertions of the firemen.
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Old December 1st, 2015, 01:21 PM   #94
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On This Day In History - 1st December 1763

John Sykes gives this report on the weather 252 years ago for this day in history, 1st December 1763, from his Local Records:

Early in the morning it began to rain at Newcastle, with the wind at S E., which continued that day with the wind very high and veering between E. and N.E.

At night it blew in a tempestuous manner, when great damage was done to several houses by the fall of chimnies, &c.; and by the prodigious swell of the river, which was at least three feet higher than ever known, the shops, cellars, and warehouses in the Close, Sandhill, Quayside, and Gateshead, were many of them filled with water. The damage was computed at upwards of £4,000.

The water about two o'clock on the following morning was full three feet deep between the Town Wall and the houses on the Quayside. A quantity of timber floated half way up the Broad Chare; and the sloop Billy, belonging to Newcastle, lying opposite to the old Customhouse, was driven upon the Quay, where she was left by the fall of the tide, but in the afternoon was safely launched, as were several keels and boats.

Several houses above bridge, contiguous to the river, were laid under water. Some poor people lost part of their furniture; an old woman was swept away from her house, near the Team; and an ox, which had broke loose from a slaughter house at the Westgate, ran into the river and was drowned.

At Shields, his majesty's ship Solebay, and about 20 light and laden colliers broke from their moorings and drove towards the bar: but the weather soon after becoming temperate, and the wind changing to the southward, the Solebay and most of the others were brought to and got safe into harbour.

There was a very high tide in the river Wear.
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Old April 14th, 2016, 07:58 AM   #95
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Newcastle Racecourse aiming for top tier of racing with £15m all-weather track

On Chronicle Live website on 13/04/16 this from GRAEME WHITFIELD

EXTRACT

Course has installed 44 floodlights and will hold twilight meetings to increase number of race days at Newcastle


Clerk of the Course James Armstrong with the new all weather track at Newcastle Racecourse

A £12m redevelopment of Newcastle racecourse has the potential to put the venue into the top rank of British racing, its owners say.

The racecourse has spent the last six months building an all-weather track and installing a system of flood lights which will allow it to greatly increase the number of meetings it holds each year and to bid for some of the world’s most lucrative races.

The course replaces Newcastle’s turf flat racing track, and will be used for the historic Northumberland Plate meeting later this year.

The racecourse has also spent money upgrading facilities for trainers and horses, and is about to embark on a £2.5m programme to refurbish its spectator areas in a bid to make the venue one of the top courses in the North.


AND

The new facility is the only all-weather track in the North, with the nearest currently at Southwell, in Nottinghamshire.

Though all-weather tracks are not favoured by some racing purists, the change will allow Newcastle to race on 49 days a year instead of its current 30, as well as avoiding the cancellations that can come in bad weather.


Full article including 1 minute 6 second video (after 40 second advert) on http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/busin...-tier-11182307

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Old April 26th, 2016, 01:37 PM   #96
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Newcastle City Council reveal plans to privatise winter gritting fleet

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...plans-11242269
Newcastle City Council reveal plans to privatise winter gritting fleet
26 Apr 2016 By Dan O'Donoghue


Newcastle City Council prepare the winter grit stores for winter at the Rothbury Terrace Depot in Newcastle

A move to privatise Newcastle’s gritting fleet has been condemned.

Newcastle City Council has revealed plans to tender a £5.9million contract to run the city’s gritters over the next 10 years. Cash strapped leaders have explained the move is a bid to sustain vital services while managing the impact of central Government cutbacks.

However opposition councillors have slammed the idea stating that the council could be “held to ransom” by a private company in times of bad weather.

Independent councillor Marc Donnelly said: “The city council has mentioned on numerous occasions the benefit of keeping things in house. But here we have a plan to privatise an essential service, these contracts might appear attractive to begin with but what happens if you’re not happy a few years down the line. Statistically we have mild winters but what happens when we have a really bad one, the council could be held to ransom by a private company.” Coun Donnelly pointed to the Metro as an example of why council services should not be out sourced. In March the decision was taken to bring the running of the Metro back in house after numerous complaints about the performance of German firm DB Regio. Coun Donnelly added: “You only have to look at the Metro and the disaster with DB Regio to realise how it can go wrong. Running services in house gives us more flexibility.”

Liberal Democrat Greg Stone added: “We are not opposed to the decision if it leads to a better service but we have questions about whether the forecast cost will exceed the budget if we have a severe winter. We also want further information about the suggestion that Rothbury Terrace depot may be sold or rented to a private operator - we gather that the council has budgeted for income from this but their expectations may not be met as a result of unforeseen costs of maintaining the premises.”

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...plans-11242269
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Old April 26th, 2016, 02:04 PM   #97
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My stepdad works for North Tyneside council in the section that grits the roads. Throughout the year North Tyneside buy grit as it's cheaper then and supply is plentiful, throughout the winter they don't buy any unless they really need it. Other councils in the area buy grit as and when they need it which makes the price of it more expensive. You could say that Newcastle could do what North Tyneside council do, but then Newcastle council may not have enough room to store mass amounts of grit throughout the year.
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Old April 26th, 2016, 10:46 PM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigchrisfgb View Post
My stepdad works for North Tyneside council in the section that grits the roads. Throughout the year North Tyneside buy grit as it's cheaper then and supply is plentiful, throughout the winter they don't buy any unless they really need it. Other councils in the area buy grit as and when they need it which makes the price of it more expensive. You could say that Newcastle could do what North Tyneside council do, but then Newcastle council may not have enough room to store mass amounts of grit throughout the year.
They have a large grit store on their Rothbury Terrace depot. Its the huge white tent thingy that was recently extended.
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Old May 17th, 2016, 09:58 AM   #99
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Newcastle Racecourse starts a new era as its all-weather track stages its opening meeting

From today's Chronicle Live, cop[yright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...w-era-11342029
Newcastle Racecourse starts a new era as its all-weather track stages its opening meeting
17 May 2016 By Sophie Barley


Clerk of the Course James Armstrong with the new all weather track at Newcastle Racecourse

A new era will begin at Gosforth Park today when Newcastle Racecourse stages its first inaugural all-weather meeting on the Tapeta surface.

Trainers from across the UK and Ireland are supporting the fixture that has attracted 105 runners for eight races. And there has been great demand for the first meeting - to the extent that one race has been divided, with prize-money of £65,000 on offer.

The £12m redevelopment of the racecourse has been completed over the last six months and includes the all-weather track and installation of a system of flood lights. The course replaces Newcastle’s turf flat racing track, and will be used for the historic Northumberland Plate meeting later this year.

“We’re looking forward to it. Everything’s up and running and ready to rock and roll for the first day,” said clerk of the course James Armstrong. We’re very pleased with the entries. We’re only seven short of our capacity for the whole card. Four of our races have reached maximum field sizes and one to the extent that we had to divide, so that’s great. The weather forecast looks favourable and hopefully we’ll get plenty of interested parties coming to have a look and see what it’s all about.”

Gates open for today’s meeting at 12 noon with the first race at 2pm.

Read more and see video @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...w-era-11342029
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Old June 21st, 2016, 06:28 PM   #100
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On This Day In History - 21st June 1772

John Sykes makes these observations concerning this day in history, 21st June 1772 within his Local records.

At noon there was a most terrible shower of rain and hail, accompanied with thunder and lightning, in Newcastle and its neighbourhood.

Chimney Mill, on the south edge of the Town-moor, was struck by the lightning, and one of its wands shattered to pieces.

A house near the head of south Tyne was set on fire by the lightning.

A fine young quey was struck dead in a field near Morpeth.
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